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126 Results for search "Occupational Health".

Health News Results - 126

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Americans mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and man's first steps on the surface of the moon, a new study offers a solution for a vexing problem that many astronauts experience on their return to Earth.

All the time that astronauts spend floating weightless can trigger fainting and dizziness when they once again feel Earth'...

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new U.S. government rule on asbestos is at best a toothless measure against the cancer-causing material, critics charge.

The rule, laid out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), went into effect in June. The agency says it was designed to strengthen decades-old public health protections.

But two former government off...

MONDAY, July 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, a new study finds.

Work disruptions range from mild, such as adjusting work hours, to severe. Severe disruptions include moving from full- to part-time jobs, taking a leave of absence or even early retirement.

The ...

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle to eat a healthy lunch during your workday, a new survey suggests you're far from alone.

"The good news is most people said they are interested in doing better" when it comes to healthy eating, said Dr. Anne Thorndike, vice chair of the nutrition committee at the American Heart Association (AHA).

The survey included...

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A possible link between World Trade Center dust and prostate cancer in first responders has been found by researchers.

Exposure to dust at the New York City site after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks triggered chronic inflammation in the responders' prostates, which may have contributed to their cancer, according to the Mount Sinai Healt...

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of American firefighters have some form of physical and emotional burnout, with sleep problems and mental health disorders as major factors, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed more than 6,300 firefighters from 66 fire departments nationwide and found that 49% had high levels of physical and emotional burnout in at least on...

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being first at the office and the last to leave may help get you that promotion, but new research warns that working long hours may not be so good for your heart.

And the longer you do it, the higher your risk for a stroke, French researchers said.

The findings come from a review of self-reported work habits and heart health among roug...

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care workers are still on the job even if they have symptoms of a cold, flu or other respiratory infection, putting patients and coworkers at risk, a new study finds.

It included more than 2,700 health care workers at nine Canadian hospitals who completed online diaries whenever they had symptoms of a respiratory infection.

...

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 70,000 adults in the United Kingdom, found that when unemployed people found a job, their mental health typically improved. But, on average, it only took eight hours of work per week -- w...

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being yelled at or insulted is never easy. But it's a situation faced by about one-quarter of U.S. home health care workers, a new study finds.

Certain environments, such as caring for someone with dementia or working in a very cramped space, were linked to a higher risk of verbal abuse from patients or their kin.

"Our study found...

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research shatters the image of U.S. soldiers as the epitome of fitness and primed for battle: Instead, they are less likely to have ideal blood pressure than their civilian counterparts.

In fact, less than one-third of active Army personnel have ideal blood pressure (120/80 mm Hg), compared with over half of the general population, the ...

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exhausted, stressed-out doctors are responsible for poorer care, patient dissatisfaction and malpractice lawsuits that carry a huge cost for U.S. health care, researchers report.

In fact, it's calculated that physician burnout adds nearly $5 billion a year to health care spending in the United States.

"Physician burnout is known to b...

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds.

It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping and lack of understanding about mental health issues.

That's the consensus of resea...

MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your back aches while on the job, you have plenty of company: New research shows that nearly 40 million American workers suffer from chronic lower back pain.

In all, that's more than a quarter of the workforce reporting lower back pain severe enough to affect their ability to work. As striking as these findings are, the researchers believe t...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Job stress, high blood pressure and poor sleep may be a recipe for an early death, German researchers report.

In a study of nearly 2,000 workers with high blood pressure who were followed for almost 18 years, those who reported having both a stressful job and poor sleep were three times more likely to die from heart disease than those who sl...

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being bullied as a youngster may lead to lifelong struggles in adulthood.

New research warns that victims of teenage bullying face a 40% greater risk for mental health problems by the time they hit their mid-20s.

Young adults with a history of adolescent bullying may also see their odds for unemployment spike by 35%, invest...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. workplaces now offer wellness programs, a new study finds.

"Most American adults work, and many spend half or more of their waking hours at work," said study author Laura Linnan. She's a professor in the department of health behavior at the University of North Carolina's School of Global Public Health.

"Wher...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

<...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many American women feel less welcome at work once they become pregnant, a new study finds.

On the other hand, expectant and new fathers often get a career boost.

"We found that pregnant women experienced decreased career encouragement in the workplace only after they disclosed they were pregnant," said study author Samantha Pausti...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your job keeps you chained to a desk all day, you might be able to erase the ill effects with regular exercise, a large new study suggests.

Research has shown that people who spend a lot of time sitting may pay for it with a higher heart disease risk and a shorter lifespan. But the new study, of nearly 150,000 adults, indicates you can avo...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even if you love your job, your workspace might not love you back. Because people may spend 40 or more hours on the job, often at a desk, all that exposure to less-than-inspiring surroundings can negatively influence health.

While some people suffer emotional and physical problems from a stressful job, for others, it's the physical environme...

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Popular workplace "wellness" programs may not offer a big payoff for workers' health or bosses' bottom lines -- at least in the short term, new research suggests.

In a study of one large U.S. company, researchers found that a wellness program led some workers to change their habits: Participants were more likely to say they were exercising a...

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid abuse-related job losses have cost U.S. federal and state governments tens of billions of dollars in lost tax revenue, a new study claims.

Penn State researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health along with estimates of declines in the U.S. labor force due to the opioid epidemic.

Between 2000...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Learning more about firefighters' increased risk for certain cancers is the aim of a voluntary registry being created by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

It's seeking more than 1.1 million firefighters to participate in the National Firefighter Registry.

"Firefighters put their lives on the line...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans work in shifts, and new research suggests it's doing no favors for their cardiovascular health.

The Chinese study of more than 320,000 people found that shift workers are at heightened risk for heart disease, and the more years they work shifts, the greater their risk.

Shift work "can earn more profit, but it c...

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who work at least two night shifts in a week may increase their risk of miscarriage in the next seven days, a new European study finds.

Danish researchers led by Dr. Luise Moelenberg Begtrup, from the Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Kobenhavn, analyzed data on n...

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screens: They're at work, at home and even in the palm of your hand. But stare too long at them and your eyes -- and mind -- could pay a price, experts warn.

For example, too much screen time can lead to problems such as eye strain, dry eye, headaches and insomnia, the American Academy of Ophthalmology warns.

"Eyestrain can be fr...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite years of worry over young doctors' grueling work hours, a new study finds that longer shifts do not jeopardize patients' safety.

The trial is one of two recent efforts to test an assumption about doctors' work hours -- that shorter hospital shifts should mean better-rested physicians and fewer medical errors.

In 2011, new ...

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- More than 40 leading CEOs from around the country have issued a step-by-step plan to improve mental health in the workplace.

The executives released a report Tuesday called "Mental Health: A Workforce Crisis" as part of a leadership collaborative called the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable that includes executives f...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Feeling trapped behind a desk, a counter or on the factory floor does no favors for the mind.

Now, research helps confirm that women with jobs that demand long hours may be more prone to depression.

Researchers found that compared with women who worked a standard 40-hour week, those who were on the clock 55 hours or more typically r...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Deceased people who are cremated after having been treated with radioactive medications might be a health hazard to crematory operators, a new case study shows.

An Arizona crematorium became contaminated with radiation following the cremation of a man who received "radiopharmaceutical" treatment two days before he died, according to a resear...

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For decades, U.S. doctors have battled the long hours and demanding schedules that often lead to "burnout." But a new study brings welcome news, showing a slight decline in the numbers of physicians dealing with the issue.

In the third of a series of studies, researchers surveyed more than 5,400 doctors nationwide and found that 44 percent rep...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Candy dishes, cupcakes and cookies abound in the typical office, so if you're striving to eat healthy, the workplace can be a culinary minefield.

Researchers surveyed more than 5,000 people and found that about one in four working adults said they got food or beverages from work at least once a week. Many of those foods were high in calorie...

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As increasing numbers of Americans use marijuana, there is a rising risk of job loss among those who use the drug, a new study suggests.

"Job loss may be an overlooked social cost of marijuana use," said study author Cassandra Okechukwu, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and colleagues.

For the study, researchers a...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Every day they help feed, bathe and care for the frailest Americans. But female health care workers in the United States often get shortchanged on wages and health insurance, a new study finds.

In fact, about one-third of female health care workers made less than $15 an hour, and that number rose to half when these workers were black or His...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a novel idea, but joining a choir at work might lower your stress levels while on the job, a new British study suggests.

It included 58 people who were part of workplace choirs in different organizations. They completed questionnaires that assessed their work-related demands, control and support.

Being part of a workplace choi...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- We know that the amount of sitting Americans do is now considered a health threat. Researchers estimate that the average adult spends more than 8 hours a day being sedentary, and it's not just all that time spent in front of the TV.

If you have a desk job and get home too exhausted to do more than plop on the sofa, that number can double.

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Losing a job or taking a big pay cut is hard on more than just your checkbook -- it might drastically increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death.

A new study finds that people who endure large swings in income over the years are much more likely to develop heart disease or suffer a premature death.

"We found t...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After having a stroke, heart attack or cardiac arrest, people are less likely to be employed than their healthy peers, new research shows.

Even if they are working, they may earn significantly less than people who haven't had a stroke or heart event, the investigators found.

Although the majority of people who have one of these seriou...

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some career advice for the new year.

Experts often suggest that people follow their passion when looking for work that they'll feel enriched by. But sometimes you don't have a choice and have to take a job that you're not quite wild about, to put it mildly.

But rather than feel resentful and unhappy every day, over time you ca...

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women juggling a medical career and motherhood often face significant workplace discrimination, a new study finds.

Researchers conducted an online survey of U.S. doctors who were mothers. The age range was 24 to 62, and most worked more than 40 hours a week.

Common complaints included less chance of career development; financial pe...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to metals and pesticides at work could increase risk of heart disease, researchers say.

Hispanic workers in the United States may be especially vulnerable because of language barriers and lower levels of education, the study authors noted.

"Exposure to metals and pesticides is common worldwide, and this study highlights t...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a good economy, the care at U.S. nursing homes falls because it's harder to attract and keep staff, a new study contends.

"During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren't many options," said principal investigator Sean Shenghsiu Huang.

"But when ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's no surprise that many Americans are working overtime. Conservative estimates say that 19 percent of adults put in 48 hours or more a week and 7 percent log in 60 or more.

But what you might not realize is that, after a certain point, extra hours could be hurting both your health and your productivity.

In addition to a variety ...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Rotating night-shift work together with an unhealthy lifestyle significantly increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers say.

"Most cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by adherence to a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits could be larger in rotating night-shift workers," said study authors led by Zhilei Shan. He is a nutritio...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Couch Potato Nation: Nearly half of Americans sit for far too many hours a day and don't get any exercise at all, a new study finds.

A survey of some 5,900 adults found that nearly 26 percent sit for more than eight hours a day, 45 percent don't get any moderate or vigorous exercise during the week, and about 11 percent sit more than eight h...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're bullied by a bad boss or co-worker, your heart may pay the price, new research shows.

Victims of on-the-job bullying or violence faced a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, the researchers found.

The new study of more than 79,000 European workers couldn't prove cause and effect. But if there is a causal link, ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of suicide among U.S. workers has jumped 34 percent since 2000, and certain occupations seem to be riskier than others, government health researchers report.

Those most at risk: men with construction and extraction jobs, and women in arts, design, entertainment, sports and media, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many injured workers turn to opioid painkillers for relief, and nearly 30 percent may still be taking them three months after their injury -- increasing the odds of addiction, a new study suggests.

"The increased likelihood of persistent opioid use among strain and sprain injuries is potentially concerning, particularly given the limited evide...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- "Sit-stand" desks can get office workers on their feet more often -- and improve their well-being along the way, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that when they swapped out traditional office desks for sit-stand versions, workers stayed on their feet for an extra 80 minutes on the average workday.

And over one year, that tra...