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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

25 Feb

The Latest Trends In Marijuana Use

More baby boomers are smoking marijuana. Women, too.

24 Feb

These Foods May Significantly Lower Your Risk Of Stroke

Fiber, fruits and veggies could cut your odds of the most common type of stroke.

More Countries Report Coronavirus Cases, as Outbreak in U.S. Looks Certain

More Countries Report Coronavirus Cases, as Outbreak in U.S. Looks Certain

More cases of coronavirus cropped up in countries throughout the world on Wednesday, one day after top U.S. health officials warned that a coronavirus outbreak on American soil is now all but a certainty.

"As more and more countries experience community spread, successful containment at our borders becomes harder and harder. Ultimately...

  • E.J. Mundell and Robin Foster
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  • February 26, 2020
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Sugary Sodas Wreak Havoc With Cholesterol Levels, Harming the Heart

Sugary Sodas Wreak Havoc With Cholesterol Levels, Harming the Heart

Sugar-sweetened drinks can play havoc with your cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which increases your risk for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

Specifically, drinking more than 12 ounces (1 standard can) of sugary sodas or fruit drinks a day may not bode well for your cardiovascular health, researchers say.

...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 26, 2020
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Paddles Against Parkinson's: Ping Pong Might Ease Symptoms

Paddles Against Parkinson's: Ping Pong Might Ease Symptoms

A spirited game of ping pong may be more than just fun: New research suggests it could quell symptoms in Parkinson's patients.

The small study found that patients with the movement disorder had significant improvements in a wide range of symptoms after taking part in a six-month ping pong exercise program.

"Ping pong, which i...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 26, 2020
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Big Breakfast May Be the Most Slimming Meal of the Day

Big Breakfast May Be the Most Slimming Meal of the Day

Starting the day with a big breakfast and keeping dinner light may help you burn more calories and keep you trimmer, new research suggests.

Eating this way may also keep your blood sugar levels from going too high, the small study found.

"Extensive breakfasting should be preferred over large dinner meals," said study lead a...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • February 26, 2020
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Female Firefighters Face Higher Exposure to Carcinogens

Female Firefighters Face Higher Exposure to Carcinogens

Female firefighters are exposed to chemicals that may be linked with breast and other types of cancer, researchers say.

Compared to women working in offices, female firefighters in San Francisco are exposed to higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These chemicals are used in firefighting foam and uniforms, grease...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 26, 2020
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Is Your Smartphone or Tablet an Injury Risk?

Is Your Smartphone or Tablet an Injury Risk?

Here's a good reason to put your electronic devices down whenever you can: Experts say that using them incorrectly or too often can put you at risk for a range of injuries.

"When people position their hand, arm or neck in uncomfortable positions for a prolonged period of time, it can lead to strains and overuse injuries," said Dr. Mich...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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Heading to Work on a Bike? You Might Live Longer

Heading to Work on a Bike? You Might Live Longer

Do you ride your bike to work? If you don't, maybe you should.

Why? People who commute by bicycle are at lower risk of dying early, a new study from New Zealand finds.

Researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, the University of Melbourne and the University of Auckland found that those who cycled to work had a 13&...

  • Kayla McKiski
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  • February 25, 2020
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New Moms Need to Watch Out for High Blood Pressure

New Moms Need to Watch Out for High Blood Pressure

All new mothers should know the signs and symptoms of high blood pressure, even if they don't have a history of the condition, researchers say.

It's not uncommon for high blood pressure to occur after childbirth. If the high blood pressure isn't treated, women can be at risk for stroke and other serious problems. In some cases, it can ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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U.S. Veterans With Blocked Leg Arteries Seeing Better Results

U.S. Veterans With Blocked Leg Arteries Seeing Better Results

Fewer U.S. veterans are having leg amputations or dying due to serious blockages in leg arteries, a new study finds.

These blockages are called critical limb ischemia (CLI). They can cause severe leg pain, wounds that don't heal and poor quality of life, according to the study published recently in the journal Circulation: Cardiovas...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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What Works Best to Ease Flare-Ups of COPD?

What Works Best to Ease Flare-Ups of COPD?

The best available drugs to treat sudden COPD flare-ups are the medications already widely in use, antibiotics and corticosteroids, a new evidence review has concluded.

There's not enough evidence to recommend newer treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), said lead researcher Dr. Claudia Dobler, a visiting scholar ...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • February 25, 2020
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AHA News: Race, Income in Neighborhoods Tied to Cardiac Arrest Survival

AHA News: Race, Income in Neighborhoods Tied to Cardiac Arrest Survival

Socioeconomics might impact the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest, suggests a new study that found survival rates are lower in heavily black than in heavily white neighborhoods, and in low- and middle-income areas compared with wealthy ones.

More than 350,000 people each year in the U.S. have out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, when the ...

5 Tips for Fighting Addiction

5 Tips for Fighting Addiction

Overcoming addiction can be difficult, with powerful cravings often causing relapse. But a psychiatrist offers some tips for success.

Know your triggers, said Dr. Nahla Mahgoub, of Gracie Square Hospital in New York City.

People in recovery are vulnerable to various environmental and emotional triggers, said Mahgoub.

...

  • Kayla McKiski
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  • February 25, 2020
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How Coronavirus Raced Through Quarantined Cruise Ship

How Coronavirus Raced Through Quarantined Cruise Ship

The crisis aboard the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan shows how germs can spread rapidly through air conditioning systems that can't filter out particles as small as the new coronavirus, one air quality expert says.

The quarantine ended last Wednesday, but not before the number of coronavirus cases reached 690 and th...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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Could Heartburn Meds Spur Growth of Drug-Resistant Germs in Your Gut?

Could Heartburn Meds Spur Growth of Drug-Resistant Germs in Your Gut?

Common heartburn meds may foster the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the gut, a new research review suggests.

In an analysis of 12 past studies, researchers found that, overall, the evidence supports a link: People who use acid-suppressing medications -- particularly proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) -- are more likely than nonu...

Anti-Addiction Meds Key to Saving Lives of People Hooked on Opioids

Anti-Addiction Meds Key to Saving Lives of People Hooked on Opioids

People treated for an opioid addiction stand a much better chance of breaking their dependency if they take opioid-blocking medications, a new study finds.

In fact, addicts who took methadone or buprenorphine had an 80% lower risk of dying from an overdose than those in treatment who are not using these drugs. Yet, many treatment ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 25, 2020
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Bad Sleep, Bad Diet = Bad Heart?

Bad Sleep, Bad Diet = Bad Heart?

It's a dangerous equation: Poor sleep triggers a bad diet, and the two can equal a higher risk for obesity and heart disease in women, a new study contends.

"Women are particularly prone to sleep disturbances across the life span, because they often shoulder the responsibilities of caring for children and family and, later, because of ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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AHA News: Legacy of Discrimination Reflected in Health Inequality

AHA News: Legacy of Discrimination Reflected in Health Inequality

Risk factors that can lead to heart disease and stroke include obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure. For African Americans, another issue also threatens their cardiovascular health: discrimination.

"This is an uncomfortable subject for many people," said Dr. Keith Churchwell, executive vice president and chief operating officer at Y...

Coronavirus Outbreak in America Is Coming: CDC

Coronavirus Outbreak in America Is Coming: CDC

A coronavirus outbreak on American soil is now all but a certainty, U.S. health officials warned Tuesday.

"As more and more countries experience community spread, successful containment at our borders becomes harder and harder. Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in this country," Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the U....

  • E.J. Mundell and Robin Foster
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  • February 25, 2020
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  • Full Page
Too Many Antibiotics, Opioids Given to Dental Patients in the ER

Too Many Antibiotics, Opioids Given to Dental Patients in the ER

Too many patients who go to U.S. emergency rooms for dental problems are prescribed antibiotics and opioid painkillers, a new study claims.

The findings show the need for continued efforts to combat both opioid abuse and overuse of antibiotics, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers said.

For the stud...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 25, 2020
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Getting Quality Autism Therapy From Thousands of Miles Away

Getting Quality Autism Therapy From Thousands of Miles Away

By the time he was 7 months old, John Michael Crawford had been diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis, associated with a high risk of developmental delays, including autism.

Early intervention programs are believed to help reduce that risk, but these time- and labor-intensive thera...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • February 25, 2020
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