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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

22 Sep

Can the Flu Shot Give You the Flu?

A vaccine expert says 'no'

21 Sep

18 Sep

Losing A Beloved Pet Can Trigger Mental Health Issues In Some Children

The pain of pet loss is worse on boys than girls, researchers say.

Minorities Hit Hardest When COVID Strikes Nursing Homes

Minorities Hit Hardest When COVID Strikes Nursing Homes

Minority residents of U.S. nursing homes and assisted living communities have been especially hard hit in the coronavirus pandemic, two University of Rochester studies show.

The first found that nursing homes with higher percentages of racial and ethnic minority residents reported two to four times more new COVID-19 cases and deaths co...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 22, 2020
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Avoid the 'Twindemic:' Get Your Flu Shot Now

Avoid the 'Twindemic:' Get Your Flu Shot Now

The best time to get your flu shot is now if you want to protect yourself against a potential "twindemic" infection of influenza and COVID-19, experts say.

"Early September, at the very least early October, is the best time to get your flu shot. That really allows your body to build up the appropriate immune response in time for the pe...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 22, 2020
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Having Flu <i>and</i> COVID Doubles Death Risk in Hospitalized Patients

Having Flu and COVID Doubles Death Risk in Hospitalized Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2020 (Healthday News) -- While health officials worry about a potential "twindemic" of COVID-19 and the flu this winter, a new study finds that hospital patients who were infected with both viruses were more than twice as likely to die as those infected only with the new coronavirus.

British government scientists con...

  • Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
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  • September 22, 2020
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Homemade Masks Do a Great Job Blocking COVID-19

Homemade Masks Do a Great Job Blocking COVID-19

Don't fret about whether that fabric mask you made on your sewing machine protects against the spread of COVID-19 as well as the face masks sold in stores, new research reassures.

Taher Saif, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examined the effectiveness of common househo...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 22, 2020
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Is an Early Form of Breast Cancer More Dangerous Than Thought?

Is an Early Form of Breast Cancer More Dangerous Than Thought?

Women diagnosed with an early, highly treatable form of breast cancer still face a higher-than-normal risk of eventually dying from the disease, a large new study finds.

The study looked at women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), where cancer cells form in the lining of the milk ducts but have not yet invaded the breast tissue. Som...

  • Amy Norton
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  • September 22, 2020
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Effects of Gun Laws Cross State Borders, New Study Suggests

Effects of Gun Laws Cross State Borders, New Study Suggests

Strong gun laws may be negated by more permissive laws in neighboring states, a new study reports.

It found that weaker gun laws appear to increase gun deaths in adjoining states. The finding could support policymakers looking to strengthen gun laws in their state, according to authors of the study published online Sept. 14 in the A...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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Middle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than Seniors

Middle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than Seniors

Middle-aged Americans are living with more physical pain than older adults are -- and the problem is concentrated among the less-educated, a new study finds.

The pattern may seem counterintuitive, since older age generally means more chronic health conditions and wear-and-tear on the body. And the middle-age pain peak is not seen in ot...

  • Amy Norton
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  • September 21, 2020
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Fall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early Stages

Fall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early Stages

In older people a fall can sometimes be a sign of oncoming Alzheimer's disease, even in the absence of mental issues, new research suggests.

Although falls are common among older people, in some cases they can be a sign of hidden mental problems that can lead to dementia, according to researchers at Washington University School of Med...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 21, 2020
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1 Woman in 5 With Migraine Avoiding Pregnancy: Study

1 Woman in 5 With Migraine Avoiding Pregnancy: Study

Many women with severe migraines don't want to get pregnant because of concerns about their headaches, a new study finds.

Migraine, one of the world's leading causes of disability, particularly affects women of childbearing age.

Researchers surveyed 607 U.S. women afflicted with severe migraines. One in 5 said they're avoidin...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Everyone needs sleep, but too little or too much of it might contribute to declines in thinking, a new study suggests.

Too little sleep was defined as four or fewer hours a night, while too much was deemed 10 or more hours a night. The ideal amount? Seven hours a night.

"Cognitive function should be monitored in individuals ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 21, 2020
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Immunotherapy Drug Boosts Survival With Bladder Cancer

Immunotherapy Drug Boosts Survival With Bladder Cancer

An immunotherapy drug significantly improved survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to a new study.

About 550,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year, making it the 10th most common type of cancer, the study authors noted.

Chemotherapy is the initial standard of c...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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Guard Yourself Against the Health Dangers of Wildfire Smoke

Guard Yourself Against the Health Dangers of Wildfire Smoke

As the smoke left by wildfires in California and Oregon continues to linger, people exposed to it need to take steps to protect themselves, an expert says.

In healthy people, wildfire smoke can cause symptoms such as runny nose, burning and watery eyes, sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath, said Dr. Reza Ronaghi, a pulmonolo...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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AHA News: High Blood Pressure May Cause Poor Communication Between Brain Regions

AHA News: High Blood Pressure May Cause Poor Communication Between Brain Regions

A test that measures blood flow changes in the brain shows people with high blood pressure are more likely to experience poorer communication between brain regions than those with normal blood pressure, according to a small study.

The research, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, also found those with...

U.S. COVID Death Toll Nears 200,000, While Cases Start to Climb Again

U.S. COVID Death Toll Nears 200,000, While Cases Start to Climb Again

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2020 (Healthday News) -- As the U.S. coronavirus case count neared 200,000 on Monday, public health experts debated whether the spread of the virus will continue to slow or a new surge will come, as cold weather returns to much of the country.

"What will happen, nobody knows," Catherine Troisi, an infectious disease e...

  • Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
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  • September 21, 2020
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COVID Survivor Rita Wilson Wants You to Get Your Flu Shot

COVID Survivor Rita Wilson Wants You to Get Your Flu Shot

Aches and fatigue quickly progressed to fever with severe chills, but the terrible and unrelenting headache was the real signal that actress Rita Wilson was in for a rough ride following her infection with COVID-19.

"It was a massive headache that really lasted for about two weeks," Wilson recalls. "It was relentless. It wasn't like Ty...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 21, 2020
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Clear Danger: Glass-Topped Tables Injure Thousands Each Year

Clear Danger: Glass-Topped Tables Injure Thousands Each Year

At Rutgers New Jersey Medical School's trauma center, Dr. Stephanie Bonne and her team noticed a string of patient injuries caused by broken glass tables.

"They were quite serious, significant injuries that required pretty big operations and long hospital stays," said Bonne, who is an assistant professor of surgery and trauma medical d...

  • Cara Roberts Murez
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  • September 21, 2020
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Holidays Can Be a Fright for Kids With Food Allergies

Holidays Can Be a Fright for Kids With Food Allergies

Parents of kids with food allergies probably won't be surprised to hear that Halloween is an especially risky time for their youngsters.

A new study found that serious allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) triggered by peanuts jumped 85% when kids were trick or treating. Serious reactions triggered by an unknown tree nut or peanut expo...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • September 21, 2020
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Potential COVID-19 Drug Could Increase Heart Risk: Study

Potential COVID-19 Drug Could Increase Heart Risk: Study

The widely prescribed antibiotic azithromycin is being investigated as a COVID-19 treatment, but a new study warns it could increase the risk of heart problems.

Researchers analyzed data from millions of patients (average age: 36) in the United States and found that azithromycin by itself isn't associated with an increase in heart prob...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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Life Expectancy Could Decline Worldwide Due to COVID-19

Life Expectancy Could Decline Worldwide Due to COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic could cause short-term decreases in life expectancy in many parts of the world, according to a new study.

Using a computer model, the researchers concluded that infection rates of only 2% could cause a drop in life expectancy in countries where average life expectancy is high (about 80 years).

At ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 21, 2020
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A Guide to Acne Care for People of Color

A Guide to Acne Care for People of Color

Dealing with acne can be especially difficult for people of color, a skin expert says.

Acne affects up to 50 million people in the United States each year. For people of color, acne is often accompanied by dark spots or patches called hyperpigmentation.

"Acne is the most common skin condition in the U.S., and it can be partic...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 19, 2020
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