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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Annual Mammograms Starting at 40 Saves The Most Lives

Annual Mammograms Starting at 40 Saves The Most Lives

Researchers hope a new study will end the debate over the best age to start breast cancer screening and how often to do it.

"The biggest takeaway point of our study is that annual screening beginning at 40 and continuing to at least age 79 gives … the most cancer deaths averted, and the most years of life gained," said lead researcher Dr...

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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EPA Will Spend $5.8 Billion to Help Clean Up U.S. Drinking Water

EPA Will Spend $5.8 Billion to Help Clean Up U.S. Drinking Water

Nearly $6 billion in funding will soon be spread through every U.S. state and territory as part of a massive, ongoing effort to clean up the nation's water supply, the Biden Administration announced Tuesday.

EPA Adminstrator Michael Regan and Vice President Kamala Harris will travel to Pittsburgh on Tuesday to announce the latest infusion ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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It's Tougher for Non-White Americans to Get Opioid Addiction Drug

It's Tougher for Non-White Americans to Get Opioid Addiction Drug

Americans addicted to opioids who need the anti-addiction med buprenorphine are far more likely to find it if they live in a predominantly white neighborhood, new research finds.

“Access is substantially better in areas that are very white," said study lead author Coleman Drake, an assistant professor of health policy and management at P...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Too Much Niacin May Be Bad for the Heart

Too Much Niacin May Be Bad for the Heart

Niacin is an essential B vitamin, but new research reveals that too much of it may harm your heart.

Found in many foods that millions of Americans eat, excessive amounts of niacin can trigger inflammation and damage blood vessels, scientists report in the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

"The average person sho...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Preventive Mastectomies May Save Lives of Women With Breast Cancer Genes

Preventive Mastectomies May Save Lives of Women With Breast Cancer Genes

Women who carry certain mutations in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes know they are at heightened odds for breast cancer.

Now, Canadian research suggests that for some patients a "risk-reducing" preventive mastectomy may cut the odds of dying from breast cancer later.

“The decision to have a risk-reducing mastectomy is often difficult fo...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Anger Won't Help You Get Ahead in the Workplace

Anger Won't Help You Get Ahead in the Workplace

Being an angry hard-charger won’t win you any points in the workplace, new research has found.

Prior evidence had suggested that workers who express anger are judged to be competent and hold a higher status, the researchers noted.

But the new studies refute those earlier findings, according to researchers from Hebrew University of ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Gene-Based Tests Could Predict Your Odds for Common Illnesses

Gene-Based Tests Could Predict Your Odds for Common Illnesses

Accurate genetic tests for 10 common diseases are nearly ready for everyday use in doctor’s offices, a new study says.

Gene scans for 10 common illnesses have been honed to the point that they now are being road-tested in clinical research, according to a team at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

The tests evaluate a person...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Can't Exercise Every Day? Weight Loss Is Still Possible

Can't Exercise Every Day? Weight Loss Is Still Possible

Folks can lose weight even if they pack all their weekly exercise into one or two days, a new study finds.

Guidelines recommend that people get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous exercise.

“Weekend warriors” who condense all that exercise into one or two days each week can l...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Patients With Depression Face Highest Risk for Suicide in Days After Hospital Discharge

Patients With Depression Face Highest Risk for Suicide in Days After Hospital Discharge

People treated at psychiatric hospitals are at highest risk of committing suicide immediately after their discharge if they suffer from depression, a new study reports.

Patients hospitalized for depression are hundreds of times more likely to commit suicide within the first three days of discharge, compared to the suicide rate of the gener...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Anorexia Can Hit Boys and Men, Too

Anorexia Can Hit Boys and Men, Too

Anorexia isn't solely a disease that strikes women and girls, Canadian experts say, so they want to raise awareness that the illness can also be serious for boys and men.

"Early identification and prompt treatment are essential," wrote a team led by Dr. Basil Kadoura. He's a specialist in adolescent health at British Columbia Children's H...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Political Changes Are Stressing Hispanic Americans: Study

Political Changes Are Stressing Hispanic Americans: Study

Immigration has become a contentious topic in America, but new research shows the heated debate on the issue may be stressing out Hispanics across the country, whether they are citizens or not.

After analyzing data from 2011-2018, the researchers discovered that, over time, there has an increase in psychological distress among all Hispanic...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 20, 2024
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Women Get More Health Gains From Exercise Compared to Men

Women Get More Health Gains From Exercise Compared to Men

There's good news for females who think that men shed pounds faster than women do: New research shows women get more health benefits from exercise than men, even if they put in less effort.

When exercising regularly, women’s risk of an early death or fatal heart event drops more than that of men who work out, researchers found.

Ove...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Raw Milk Cheese

E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Raw Milk Cheese

Raw milk cheese tainted with E. coli bacteria has sickened 10 people in four states, hospitalizing four, federal regulators warn.

The cases have been tied to Raw Farm brand raw cheddar cheese, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a food safety alert.

Six of the patients remembered which type of raw cheese they ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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FDA Approves New Treatment  for Advanced Melanoma

FDA Approves New Treatment for Advanced Melanoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a novel treatment for advanced melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer.

Amtagvi, made by Iovance Biotherapeutics Inc., becomes the first cellular therapy approved to treat this form of solid tumor cancer.

“Unresectable, or metastatic, melanoma is an aggressive form of cancer ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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What Helps the Homeless Who Have Pets? Study Has Answers

What Helps the Homeless Who Have Pets? Study Has Answers

One in 10 homeless people has a pet, and one-stop health clinics where both can get health care would benefit both, a new study suggests.

The study, published Feb. 19 in the journal Human-Animal Interactions, found that joint people-pet clinics, free veterinary clinics and pet-friendly lodging are common ways homeless people and ...

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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Seniors, FDA Has 5 Medication Tips to Keep You Safe

Seniors, FDA Has 5 Medication Tips to Keep You Safe

When settling into your senior years, you need to be especially careful when taking medicines, herbal remedies and supplements, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

That’s because older adults are likely to use more prescription and over-the-counter medications, which increases the risk of harmful side effects and drug interactio...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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Science Gets to the Bottom of Bad Breath

Science Gets to the Bottom of Bad Breath

Bad breath: No one wants it, but its origins have long remained unclear.

Now, Japanese researchers have gotten a bit closer to understanding how bad breath begins, and perhaps ways to treat it.

The roots of the malady involve chemicals, including one called methyl mercaptan, that are produced by bacteria in the mouth. These bacteri...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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Access to Opioids Could Be Boosting Suicide Rates

Access to Opioids Could Be Boosting Suicide Rates

Increased access to prescription opioids has driven up U.S. suicide rates by making it easier to women to end their lives, a new study claims.

The study also blames a shrinking federal safety net during tough economic times for rising suicide rates.

“We contend that the U.S. federal government’s weak regulatory oversight of the p...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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Black, Hispanic Middle Class Finding It Tougher to Afford Senior Housing, Health Care

Black, Hispanic Middle Class Finding It Tougher to Afford Senior Housing, Health Care

Millions of Black and Hispanic middle-class adults won’t be able to afford senior housing and health care expenses as they grow old, a new study warns.

The number of middle-income older adults of color is expected to double within the next decade, rising from 12% in 2020 to 25% in 2035.

But compared to the entire U.S. middle class,...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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Parenting Style Could Influence ADHD Severity in Kids

Parenting Style Could Influence ADHD Severity in Kids

A shift in parenting early in a child's development might help curb the symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests.

When a preschooler exhibits an "excitable or exuberant" temperament, dialing down a "controlling" style of parenting in favor of what's known as "directive" parenting could mean milder...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2024
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