Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

22 Sep

Can the Flu Shot Give You the Flu?

A vaccine expert says 'no'

21 Sep

18 Sep

Losing A Beloved Pet Can Trigger Mental Health Issues In Some Children

The pain of pet loss is worse on boys than girls, researchers say.

Many Health Care Workers Who Have Coronavirus Don't Have Symptoms: Study

Many Health Care Workers Who Have Coronavirus Don't Have Symptoms: Study

Four in 10 health care workers who test positive for COVID-19 don't have symptoms, which means they could unknowingly spread the disease to co-workers and patients, researchers say.

For the new study, the research team reviewed 97 studies that included more than 230,000 health care workers in 24 countries. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
4 Out of 5 People With COVID-19 Will Develop Symptoms: Study

4 Out of 5 People With COVID-19 Will Develop Symptoms: Study

Folks shrugging off the risk of COVID-19 because they don't think the virus will do them much harm might want to think again.

As many as four out of five people infected with the new coronavirus likely will suffer some symptoms of COVID-19, a new analysis shows.

Only about 20% of infected people remain symptom-free while ...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Teens Aren't Turning to E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking

Teens Aren't Turning to E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking

Most teens who vape aren't looking to quit smoking, a new study of Twitter suggests.

This finding belies Juul's claim that its e-cigarette is improving smokers' lives, the researchers said.

For the study, researchers analyzed more than 4,000 tweets and found that only 1% of Twitter users mentioned Juul as a way to stop ...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Certain Cancer Treatments May Heighten Danger From COVID-19

Certain Cancer Treatments May Heighten Danger From COVID-19

People with cancer are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. Now, a preliminary study suggests that certain cancer therapies may heighten those odds even further.

Researchers found that of 3,600 U.S. cancer patients who contracted COVID-19, the highest risk of death was among those who'd received cancer treatment within the past three...

  • Amy Norton
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Sleep Builds the Brain in the Early Years, Then Maintains It

Sleep Builds the Brain in the Early Years, Then Maintains It

For the very young, sleep builds and strengthens the brain, but it quickly switches to maintenance and repair before a child turns 3, new research shows.

Before about the age of 2½, the brain grows rapidly. And during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep a baby's brain builds and strengthens synapses, which connect neurons to each other...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Baby's Heart Rate Reflects Mom's Mental Health

Baby's Heart Rate Reflects Mom's Mental Health

Babies of mothers with anxiety or depression can have significantly higher heart rates than normal, a new study finds.

And this might put them at risk for long-term problems, researchers say.

Mother-infant interaction plays a crucial role in children's healthy development, but moms with depression, anxiety or postnatal depres...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Minorities Hit Hardest When COVID Strikes Nursing Homes

Minorities Hit Hardest When COVID Strikes Nursing Homes

Minority residents of U.S. nursing homes and assisted living communities have been especially hard hit in the coronavirus pandemic, two University of Rochester studies show.

The first found that nursing homes with higher percentages of racial and ethnic minority residents reported two to four times more new COVID-19 cases and deaths co...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Avoid the 'Twindemic:' Get Your Flu Shot Now

Avoid the 'Twindemic:' Get Your Flu Shot Now

The best time to get your flu shot is now if you want to protect yourself against a potential "twindemic" infection of influenza and COVID-19, experts say.

"Early September, at the very least early October, is the best time to get your flu shot. That really allows your body to build up the appropriate immune response in time for the pe...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Search and Rescue Dogs Fared Well After Working at 9/11 Sites

Search and Rescue Dogs Fared Well After Working at 9/11 Sites

Search and rescue dogs used during the 9/11 attacks lived as long as dogs not at the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon, a new study finds.

"I was at Ground Zero and I would hear people make comments like, 'Did you hear that half of the dogs that responded to the bombing in Oklahoma City died of X, Y, or Z?' Or they'...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Once-a-Week Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise in Early Trial

Once-a-Week Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise in Early Trial

Type 2 diabetes can be tough to control without medication. But for some people, the thought of daily shots makes them delay or avoid starting insulin therapy.

Now, new research offers some hope for those insulin avoiders -- a once-a-week insulin injection may someday replace daily shots.

A phase 2 trial compared the new wee...

  • Serena Gordon
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
AHA News: Cluster of Risky Conditions That Can Lead To Heart Disease Is Rising in Hispanic Adults

AHA News: Cluster of Risky Conditions That Can Lead To Heart Disease Is Rising in Hispanic Adults

A cluster of conditions called metabolic syndrome that could lead to heart disease and stroke is becoming more common among Hispanic adults, and experts say there needs to be more research and more work in prevention.

Overall, metabolic syndrome affects about 1 in 3 adults in the United States and puts them at higher risk of heart diseas...

Having Flu <i>and</i> COVID Doubles Death Risk in Hospitalized Patients

Having Flu and COVID Doubles Death Risk in Hospitalized Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2020 (Healthday News) -- While health officials worry about a potential "twindemic" of COVID-19 and the flu this winter, a new study finds that hospital patients who were infected with both viruses were more than twice as likely to die as those infected only with the new coronavirus.

British government scientists con...

  • Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Homemade Masks Do a Great Job Blocking COVID-19

Homemade Masks Do a Great Job Blocking COVID-19

Don't fret about whether that fabric mask you made on your sewing machine protects against the spread of COVID-19 as well as the face masks sold in stores, new research reassures.

Taher Saif, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examined the effectiveness of common househo...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Is an Early Form of Breast Cancer More Dangerous Than Thought?

Is an Early Form of Breast Cancer More Dangerous Than Thought?

Women diagnosed with an early, highly treatable form of breast cancer still face a higher-than-normal risk of eventually dying from the disease, a large new study finds.

The study looked at women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), where cancer cells form in the lining of the milk ducts but have not yet invaded the breast tissue. Som...

  • Amy Norton
  • |
  • September 22, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Effects of Gun Laws Cross State Borders, New Study Suggests

Effects of Gun Laws Cross State Borders, New Study Suggests

Strong gun laws may be negated by more permissive laws in neighboring states, a new study reports.

It found that weaker gun laws appear to increase gun deaths in adjoining states. The finding could support policymakers looking to strengthen gun laws in their state, according to authors of the study published online Sept. 14 in the A...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Middle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than Seniors

Middle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than Seniors

Middle-aged Americans are living with more physical pain than older adults are -- and the problem is concentrated among the less-educated, a new study finds.

The pattern may seem counterintuitive, since older age generally means more chronic health conditions and wear-and-tear on the body. And the middle-age pain peak is not seen in ot...

  • Amy Norton
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Fall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early Stages

Fall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early Stages

In older people a fall can sometimes be a sign of oncoming Alzheimer's disease, even in the absence of mental issues, new research suggests.

Although falls are common among older people, in some cases they can be a sign of hidden mental problems that can lead to dementia, according to researchers at Washington University School of Med...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
1 Woman in 5 With Migraine Avoiding Pregnancy: Study

1 Woman in 5 With Migraine Avoiding Pregnancy: Study

Many women with severe migraines don't want to get pregnant because of concerns about their headaches, a new study finds.

Migraine, one of the world's leading causes of disability, particularly affects women of childbearing age.

Researchers surveyed 607 U.S. women afflicted with severe migraines. One in 5 said they're avoidin...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Too Much or Too Little Sleep Bad for Your Brain

Everyone needs sleep, but too little or too much of it might contribute to declines in thinking, a new study suggests.

Too little sleep was defined as four or fewer hours a night, while too much was deemed 10 or more hours a night. The ideal amount? Seven hours a night.

"Cognitive function should be monitored in individuals ...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
Immunotherapy Drug Boosts Survival With Bladder Cancer

Immunotherapy Drug Boosts Survival With Bladder Cancer

An immunotherapy drug significantly improved survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to a new study.

About 550,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year, making it the 10th most common type of cancer, the study authors noted.

Chemotherapy is the initial standard of c...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • September 21, 2020
  • |
  • Full Page
HealthDay
Health News is provided as a service to Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy site users by HealthDay. Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please seek medical advice directly from your pharmacist or physician.
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay All Rights Reserved.