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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

06 Feb

Breast MRI Superior Method for Detecting Cancer in Women with Dense Breasts and Negative Mammogram, Study Finds

Researchers compare 4 common supplemental breast cancer tests and find breast MRI is the most effective at detecting cancer in women with dense breasts.

03 Feb

Antidepressants Are Often Prescribed for Chronic Pain, But Do They Work?

A new study finds while some antidepressants help certain pain conditions, others are either ineffective or the evidence is inconclusive.

02 Feb

Estrogen Exposure May Impact a Women’s Odds of Stroke

Women with long reproductive lifespans may have a lower risk of stroke, according to new research.

Targeted Drug Tagrisso Could Be Advance Against Lung Cancer

Targeted Drug Tagrisso Could Be Advance Against Lung Cancer

The best treatment for a genetically driven form of lung cancer continues to show lasting benefits, a new clinical trial update shows.

Tagrisso (osimertinib) nearly doubles disease-free survival in earlier-stage patients whose lung cancer is driven by a mutation in their EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) gene, researchers report.

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  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

That seemingly sudden heart attack? It may have been triggered by underlying coronary heart disease.

Heart attack is a big event, but for some it might be the first sign of a problem that has been building for quite some time.

Coronary heart disease -- also known as coronary artery disease -- is the most common type of heart disease...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Hundreds of U.S. Doctors Lost Their Lives During Pandemic

Hundreds of U.S. Doctors Lost Their Lives During Pandemic

Many of America's doctors who were heroes on the frontlines of the pandemic paid the ultimate price for their efforts, a new analysis shows.

An estimated 622 extra deaths occurred among U.S. doctors aged 45 and over from the pandemic's onset in March 2020 through December 2021, researchers say.

Older doctors who provided direct care...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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AHA News: Indigenous Populations May Have Higher Stroke Risk

AHA News: Indigenous Populations May Have Higher Stroke Risk

In highly developed countries, Indigenous populations may have a higher rate of stroke, according to new research that highlights a dire need for more data and well-designed studies.

Each year, nearly 12 million people worldwide have a stroke, which takes place when a vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a clot or the vessel ru...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • February 6, 2023
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His Debilitating Back Pain Lasted Decades, Until a New Implant Changed Everything

His Debilitating Back Pain Lasted Decades, Until a New Implant Changed Everything

After living with disabling low back pain for nearly 30 years, Dennis Bassett, 64, finally has a new lease on life.

The Hempstead, N.Y., native injured his back in the 1980s when helping a friend. He tried everything to relieve his back pain, from self-medication, acupuncture, and chiropractor work to steroid injections, physical therapy a...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Got Bunions? Key Factors to Whether Surgery Will Work for You

Got Bunions? Key Factors to Whether Surgery Will Work for You

When it comes to bunions, millions of Americans are painfully familiar with the signs: Swelling, redness, a telltale bulge on the side of the big toe. Corns and calluses where other toes rub together. And pain. Lots and lots of pain.

Fortunately, when surgery is needed, it's usually a success. But not always.

So researchers have ste...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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MRI Might Boost Cancer Detection for Women With Dense Breasts

MRI Might Boost Cancer Detection for Women With Dense Breasts

Nearly half of women have dense breast tissue, which can be a double whammy on their odds for breast cancer.

Not only are dense breasts a risk factor for cancer, but this glandular and fibrous connective tissue make it harder to detect cancers on a mammogram, the usual method for breast cancer screening.

New research looked at other ...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Rare But Dangerous Form of Eating Disorder Could Run in Families

Rare But Dangerous Form of Eating Disorder Could Run in Families

Genes may have a strong influence over whether kids develop an eating disorder marked by extremely limited food choices, a new study finds.

The study focused on a condition called avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID). It's a relatively new diagnosis that describes people who severely limit the types or quantity of food they ea...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Measles Outbreak in Ohio Declared Over After 85 Cases

Measles Outbreak in Ohio Declared Over After 85 Cases

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2023 (HealthDay News) – A central Ohio measles outbreak among children who were not fully vaccinated is now over, public health officials announced Saturday.

Columbus Health declared the outbreak finished with no new cases after a period of 42 days -- the equivalent of two measles virus incubation periods.

In all, ...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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U.S. Tourists in Northern Mexico Are Buying Counterfeit Pills Containing Fentanyl

U.S. Tourists in Northern Mexico Are Buying Counterfeit Pills Containing Fentanyl

Researchers have uncovered groundbreaking evidence that pharmacies in tourist areas of Northern Mexico are selling counterfeit pills containing fentanyl, heroin and methamphetamines.

The pills, mainly sold to U.S. tourists without a prescription, were passed off as controlled substances, including oxycodone, percocet and Adderall, the stud...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Live Near Busy Traffic? You May Be at Higher Odds for Tinnitus

Live Near Busy Traffic? You May Be at Higher Odds for Tinnitus

People who live near traffic noise, especially when it continues at night, are more likely to develop the repetitive whistling or buzzing sounds in their ears known as tinnitus.

Danish researchers found a link between the risk of developing the condition and traffic noise, with a vicious cycle of stress reactions and sleep disturbance as ...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Stock Photos Used in Health News, PSAs Typically Focus on the Young & White

Stock Photos Used in Health News, PSAs Typically Focus on the Young & White

When researchers searched for a stock image of a pregnant Hispanic woman for a science communication effort, they hit upon a problem.

Many of the images were of young, light-skinned people without the diversity in age or race needed for projects aimed at other groups, their study found. This matters, the researchers said, because including...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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Understanding Your Cholesterol Numbers

Understanding Your Cholesterol Numbers

You might not think about your cholesterol very often, if ever, but it’s important to know your numbers.

It’s even helpful to get it checked at a young age, according to one heart expert.

“People in their 20s may never consider getting their cholesterol checked, but they should because it may uncover a genetic predisposition to...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 6, 2023
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How Ice & Snow Can Harm Your Wrists, Hands

How Ice & Snow Can Harm Your Wrists, Hands

Winter’s icy beauty can also be dangerous.

An orthopedic expert offers some tips for avoiding serious injuries on slippery ground or hazards hidden by snow.

"When people have injuries during the winter, it commonly involves tripping over an object or slipping on ice," said Dr. Richard Samade, an assistant professor of orthopedic su...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 5, 2023
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Not Just Brushing: 10 Ways to Start Caring for Baby Teeth

Not Just Brushing: 10 Ways to Start Caring for Baby Teeth

Even the tiniest teeth can decay, which is why it’s important to take care of them.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers some tips for caring for those little teeth, starting before the first one even arrives.

"There are habits you can start now to keep your baby's teeth healthy,” Dr. David Krol said in an academy news...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 4, 2023
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USDA Proposes New Rules to Cut Sugar, Salt in School Meals

USDA Proposes New Rules to Cut Sugar, Salt in School Meals

American schoolchildren could be getting school lunches that have less sugar and salt in the future, thanks to new nutrition standards announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday.

These are the first school lunch program updates since 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What’s different this time i...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 3, 2023
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When Schools Ask Students About Suicide, Those At Risk Get Help Sooner

When Schools Ask Students About Suicide, Those At Risk Get Help Sooner

Could asking teens a simple, but pointed, question about their mental health reveal whether they are at risk for suicide?

It might, new research suggests.

Since suicide is now the second leading cause of death among American teens, any strategy that could lower that risk may be worth trying.

“The depression screening to...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 3, 2023
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AHA News: They Married at Hospital Chapel, Days Before Groom's Triple Bypass Surgery

AHA News: They Married at Hospital Chapel, Days Before Groom's Triple Bypass Surgery

Although weekday weddings are a growing trend, Daniel Pecoraro and Lisa Siegel hadn't originally scheduled theirs for a Monday afternoon. And certainly not at a hospital near their home in Boynton Beach, Florida.

But married life requires adjusting to situations, and they faced a drastic one days before their vows were to be exchanged.

...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • February 3, 2023
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AHA News: Genes, Neighborhoods and a Surprising Finding on Stroke Risk

AHA News: Genes, Neighborhoods and a Surprising Finding on Stroke Risk

A genetic score may be able to identify higher stroke risk – but only for people living in the most privileged neighborhoods, according to new research that highlights inequities related to wealth and health.

Researchers looked at acute ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke. It is caused by a clot blocking blood flow to the bra...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • February 3, 2023
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Working Gets Tough When Grieving a Lost Spouse

Working Gets Tough When Grieving a Lost Spouse

When Elizabeth R.’s husband passed away from bone cancer in 2016, she felt grateful that her employer offered generous bereavement leave.

Now 40, she worked in the development department of a large nonprofit cancer group at the time and felt ready to go back when her leave was up. However, about two weeks into her return, she realized it...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 3, 2023
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