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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Are You a 'Stress Bragger'? It's Probably Backfiring

Are You a 'Stress Bragger'? It's Probably Backfiring

"Ugh, I'm so busy these days I can barely think straight. It's so crazy."

No doubt some friend or coworker (maybe even yourself) has moaned about how stressed and overworked they are.

Sometimes its fully justified, but in many cases folks see it as "stress bragging," or "busy bragging," signaling how important and needed t...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 27, 2024
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Moms, Even When Kids Reject Your Advice, It's Still Helping Them

Moms, Even When Kids Reject Your Advice, It's Still Helping Them

Does advising your teen sometimes feel like talking to the proverbial brick wall?

Don't fret: New research shows that even when your preteen or teen gives your advice a flat "no way," your counsel is probably having an impact.

It may simply be tucked away by your child, ready for use another day.

“The kids are at an age whe...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 27, 2024
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Tea Was a Real Life Saver in 18th Century England

Tea Was a Real Life Saver in 18th Century England

Sipped from porcelain cups amid the music of Mozart and periwigs of the 1700s, tea was introduced to England and began its quiet work saving thousands of lives, new research confirms.

It wasn't the leaves that kept tea drinkers out of danger: It was the boiled water tea was served in.

Unboiled water had long left England's resident...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 27, 2024
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Had a Joint Replaced? Your Infection Risk May Rise After Chemotherapy

Had a Joint Replaced? Your Infection Risk May Rise After Chemotherapy

If you're one of the millions of Americans walking around with a new knee or hip, your odds for an infection in that joint rise if you ever have to undergo cancer chemotherapy, researchers report.

“Given the number of people of receiving total joint replacements each year, as well as the cost both physically, emotionally and financially ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 27, 2024
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Stay Safe From the Sun & That Backyard Grill This Memorial Day

Stay Safe From the Sun & That Backyard Grill This Memorial Day

Memorial Day means firing up that backyard grill for the season, hopefully under warm, sunny skies.

You can be sure to enjoy the day without hazards by taking a few simple precautions, said Dr. Mike Ren, an associate professor of family and community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Watch out for rising hea...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 26, 2024
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Gardeners, Landscapers: Watch Out for These High Heat Danger Signs

Gardeners, Landscapers: Watch Out for These High Heat Danger Signs

Climate change is pushing daytime summer temperatures higher for longer periods of time, and that can spell real danger for folks who work outside, like gardeners and landscapers.

Protecting yourself in the heat and knowing the warning signs of heat-related illness is crucial, said Chris Enroth, horticulture educator at University of Illin...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 25, 2024
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In Experiments, Mice Got Ill From Raw Milk Carrying Bird Flu Virus

In Experiments, Mice Got Ill From Raw Milk Carrying Bird Flu Virus

Confirming the dangers of drinking raw cow's milk when the H5N1 avian flu virus is circulating in U.S. dairy herds, researchers found that mice fed the milk quickly got ill.

"Our data indicate that HPAI A[H5N1] virus in untreated milk can infect susceptible animals that consume it," concluded a team led by virologist Yoshihiro Kawaoka, of...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Colon Cancers Are Rising Among the Young: Know the Warning Signs

Colon Cancers Are Rising Among the Young: Know the Warning Signs

Colon cancer is increasingly hitting Americans under the age of 50, and a new study outlines the warning signs that these young patients first encounter.

The analysis was based on data from 80 different studies, involving almost 25 million patients under the age of 50.

In nearly half (45%) of cases, blood in stools was an initial s...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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FDA Panel Gives Nod to Blood Test for Colon Cancer

FDA Panel Gives Nod to Blood Test for Colon Cancer

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on Thursday recommended the approval of a new blood test that can spot colon cancer.

The panel voted 7-2 that the benefits outweighed the risks when using the Guardant Health's Shield test for colon cancer.

“The advisory committee’s strong support for the approval of Shield ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Louisiana Votes to Make Abortion Pills Controlled Substances

Louisiana Votes to Make Abortion Pills Controlled Substances

Louisiana has become the first state to pass a law that designates abortion pills as dangerous controlled substances.

Once Gov. Jeff Landry signs the bill into law, as he is expected to do, possession of the drugs mifepristone and misoprostol without a prescription would be a crime punishable with possible fines and jail time.

Louisi...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Ozempic Lowers Odds for Death, Illness in People With Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Ozempic Lowers Odds for Death, Illness in People With Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Ozempic provides a wide variety of health benefits for people with kidney disease and type 2 diabetes, a major clinical trial has found.

The drug significantly reduces the risk of severe kidney events, heart problems and death from any cause in patients who have both conditions, researchers found.

“These benefits signify a profound...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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HPV Vaccine Is Also Preventing Cancers in Men: Study

HPV Vaccine Is Also Preventing Cancers in Men: Study

Development and uptake of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has been crucial in reducing rates of virus-linked cervical cancers in women.

Now, the accumulated data suggests the vaccine is saving men from fatal cancers, too.

Overall, men who got the vaccine [typically as boys] saw their odds for HPV-linked cancers slashed in ha...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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AI Might Help Spot Breast Cancer's Spread Without Biopsy

AI Might Help Spot Breast Cancer's Spread Without Biopsy

New AI can help detect breast cancer that is spreading to other parts of the body, without the need for biopsies, a new study finds.

The AI analyzes MRI scans to detect the presence of cancer cells in the lymph nodes under the arms, researchers said.

In clinical practice, the AI could help avoid 51% of unnecessary surgical biopsies t...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Most Young Breast Cancer Survivors Can Have Children

Most Young Breast Cancer Survivors Can Have Children

Most young breast cancer survivors can go on to have children despite the effects of their lifesaving treatment, a new study shows.

About 73% of breast cancer survivors attempting to conceive achieved a pregnancy and 65% had a live birth, researchers report.

Those who opted for egg/embryo freezing prior to cancer treatment tended to ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Subtle Mental Declines Occur Before Older Folk Quit Driving

Subtle Mental Declines Occur Before Older Folk Quit Driving

One of the toughest decisions seniors face is when to give up their keys and stop driving.

Even slight changes to the ability to remember, think and reason can lead a senior to decide to stop driving, a new study finds.

Impaired cognitive function foreshadows the decision of many seniors to give up driving, even more so than age or p...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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New Steps Towards a Male Birth Control Pill

New Steps Towards a Male Birth Control Pill

For decades, the responsibility for birth control has fallen largely on women, but new research suggests a birth control pill for men might one day become a reality.

How does it work? It targets a protein required for fertility, scientists report.

The protein, called serine/threonine kinase 33 (STK33), is enriched in the testicles an...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 24, 2024
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Stroke Rates Are Rising, Especially Among the Young

Stroke Rates Are Rising, Especially Among the Young

The rate at which Americans under the age of 65 suffered a stroke rose by about 15% between 2011 and 2022, new government data shows.

That was true even among the young: The rate of stroke jumped 14.6% among people ages 18 to 44 during the study period, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

It's ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2024
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Costs, Side Effects Drive Folks to Quit New Weight-Loss Meds

Costs, Side Effects Drive Folks to Quit New Weight-Loss Meds

Three months after starting one of the new GLP-1 weight-loss drugs, more than a quarter of patients have already quit the medications, and by a year from first use more than a third have stopped, new research shows.

Reasons for quitting Wegovy, Ozempic or similar drugs may include cost or gastrointestinal side effects, said a team led by U...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2024
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'Moving Forward': Battling Parkinson's, He's Rowing His Way to Paralympic Games

'Moving Forward': Battling Parkinson's, He's Rowing His Way to Paralympic Games

For decades, Todd Vogt has been dedicated to the sport of rowing, believing he was in peak physical condition. Then, a series of symptoms began to emerge, turning his life upside down.

"My left arm stopped swinging, and I felt incredibly fatigued," Vogt, 49, recalled. "Eventually, a tremor developed in my hand, and I slowly began to reali...

  • Lori Saxena HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2024
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CDC Reports Second Dairy Worker Infected With Bird Flu

CDC Reports Second Dairy Worker Infected With Bird Flu

A second case of bird flu has been detected in another dairy worker, this time in Michigan, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

The first case was reported in a dairy worker in Texas in early April.

Officials said the Michigan individual, who only experienced mild symptoms, contracted the H5N1 virus after being exposed to infec...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2024
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