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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

21 Oct

Cleaning Products and Lung Health

Nurses regularly exposed to disinfectants at work may be at increased risk of serious lung diseases.

18 Oct

Sugar-Sweetened Drinks Still Dominate The Children's Drink Market

None of the 34 top-selling sweetened children's drinks meet expert health recommendations.

17 Oct

Irregular Periods and Your Health

Irregular menstrual cycles could signal an underlying medical issue.

Not All Transplant Centers Use Deceased-Donor Kidneys, Despite Growing Need

Not All Transplant Centers Use Deceased-Donor Kidneys, Despite Growing Need

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. transplant centers accept less-than-ideal kidneys from deceased donors, but their willingness to use such organs varies widely.

That's the conclusion of a study that examined the use of deceased-donor kidneys at 182 transplant centers nationwide.

Researchers found big differ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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Smartphone App Gets Heart Patients to Follow Their Rx

Smartphone App Gets Heart Patients to Follow Their Rx

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Forget doctor's instructions: New research shows a smartphone app is the best way to get heart patients to remember to take their medicines.

Heart attack survivors are typically prescribed medications to prevent another attack, but one in four stop taking at least one drug within 30 days after...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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Scientists Spot Signs of Virus Behind Disease Paralyzing Kids

Scientists Spot Signs of Virus Behind Disease Paralyzing Kids

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new antibody test appears to have honed in on the most likely cause of a mysterious polio-like disease that regularly sweeps through the United States.

The new test detected antibodies for two types of enteroviruses in the spinal fluid of dozens of patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelit...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 21, 2019
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American Indians May Have Higher Odds for A-Fib

American Indians May Have Higher Odds for A-Fib

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- American Indians have a higher rate of the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation than other racial/ethnic groups, a new study suggests.

Commonly called a-fib, the heart rhythm disorder affects about 2.7 million people in the United States, putting them at increased risk of stroke and...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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Study Links Asbestos in Talcum Powder to Deadly Cancer

Study Links Asbestos in Talcum Powder to Deadly Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As concerns about baby powder being contaminated with asbestos mount, a new study finds a link between such contamination and a rare and deadly cancer.

A group of 33 people developed mesothelioma after long-term use of talcum powder and no exposure to other sources of asbestos, the report state...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 21, 2019
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Pro Soccer Players More Likely to Develop Dementia: Study

Pro Soccer Players More Likely to Develop Dementia: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former professional soccer players have a significantly increased risk of death from brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, a new study finds.

Former soccer players were about 3.5 times more likely to die of neurodegenerative diseases than people in the general population, accordin...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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AHA News: Deadly Heart Problem Might Not Be So Deadly

AHA News: Deadly Heart Problem Might Not Be So Deadly

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- An incurable condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be less deadly than previously thought, according to a new study of sudden cardiac deaths among young people.

At least 1 in 500 people worldwide are thought to have HCM, though estimates vary. The heart muscle enlar...

Many Parents Not Following Safe-Sleep Advice for Babies

Many Parents Not Following Safe-Sleep Advice for Babies

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. parents are not heeding recommendations on how to put their babies to sleep safely, a new government study finds.

Most babies are being placed on their backs to sleep -- one of the key ways to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the study found.

But rela...

Secondhand Smoke May Harm Kids' Eyes

Secondhand Smoke May Harm Kids' Eyes

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking around kids may harm their vision as their eyes are still developing, a new study suggests.

Secondhand smoke has long been linked to increased risks for cancer and stroke in adults, and asthma, lung infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in children, according to the America...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • October 21, 2019
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Can More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?

Can More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting exercise capacity may protect the mental functioning of childhood leukemia survivors, according to a new study.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. Due to their disease and treatment, childhood ALL survivors are at increased risk for problems with th...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After Surgery

1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After Surgery

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid painkillers are prescribed to 1 in 5 patients who get a pacemaker or other implantable heart device, a new study finds.

It included more than 16,500 U.S. adults who had heart devices implanted between 2010 and 2018.

After their procedures, opioids were prescribed to about 20...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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How to Get the Fruit and Veggies You Need Without Busting the Budget

How to Get the Fruit and Veggies You Need Without Busting the Budget

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fresh foods can be expensive, especially if you're trying to go organic. But if you want to eat healthier by skipping processed, packaged foods, it is possible to keep costs under control and still get in the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables.

The U.S. Department of Agricultu...

What to Do If You Have a Bad Reaction to Cosmetics

What to Do If You Have a Bad Reaction to Cosmetics

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One consequence of the government's limited role in regulating cosmetics is that questionable products may stay on store shelves and e-commerce sites despite complaints. Even when consumers report problems, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can't issue a recall -- it can only recommend one.

What Kind of Drinking Can Trigger A-Fib?

What Kind of Drinking Can Trigger A-Fib?

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent drinking is more likely than binge drinking to increase your risk of the most common heart rhythm disorder, a new study finds.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) increases the risk of stroke by fivefold. Symptoms include racing or irregular pulse, palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness,...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Study Uncovers Racial Gaps in Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

Study Uncovers Racial Gaps in Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are significant racial disparities in treatment of U.S. patients with multiple myeloma, a new study shows.

Researchers reviewed nationwide data on 3,504 white, 858 black and 468 Hispanic patients treated from 2007 to 2013.

The average time between multiple myeloma diagnosis and ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic ...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 18, 2019
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Drug Limits Damage of Brain Injury

Drug Limits Damage of Brain Injury

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many brain injury deaths could be prevented by using an inexpensive drug in the critical hours following a head trauma, a new international study finds.

"Traumatic brain injury can happen to anyone at any time, whether it's through an incident like a car crash or simply falling down the stairs,...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight is hard on the heart, but new research shows it may also harm your lungs.

The study found that higher amounts of fat collect in the airways of overweight and obese people, which may help explain why they're more likely to have wheezing and asthma.

In the study, the inves...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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AHA News: Retired? Hardly – at 99, This Pioneering Heart Doctor Still Leading the Way

AHA News: Retired? Hardly – at 99, This Pioneering Heart Doctor Still Leading the Way

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- At 99 years old, most people are not engaging in complex research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Jeremiah Stamler is no ordinary person.

The author and co-author of hundreds of peer-reviewed studies and books, Stamler's cutting-edge research into the ca...

Confusing Medical Bills Tied to Money Woes in Cancer Survivors

Confusing Medical Bills Tied to Money Woes in Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Difficulty understanding health insurance and medical bills may cause financial hardship for cancer survivors, a new study finds.

There is growing evidence that many American adults lack health insurance literacy, which is the knowledge, ability and confidence to obtain, evaluate and use health...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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