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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

21 Oct

Cleaning Products and Lung Health

Nurses regularly exposed to disinfectants at work may be at increased risk of serious lung diseases.

18 Oct

Sugar-Sweetened Drinks Still Dominate The Children's Drink Market

None of the 34 top-selling sweetened children's drinks meet expert health recommendations.

17 Oct

Irregular Periods and Your Health

Irregular menstrual cycles could signal an underlying medical issue.

Many Parents Not Following Safe-Sleep Advice for Babies

Many Parents Not Following Safe-Sleep Advice for Babies

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. parents are not heeding recommendations on how to put their babies to sleep safely, a new government study finds.

Most babies are being placed on their backs to sleep -- one of the key ways to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the study found.

But rela...

Secondhand Smoke May Harm Kids' Eyes

Secondhand Smoke May Harm Kids' Eyes

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking around kids may harm their vision as their eyes are still developing, a new study suggests.

Secondhand smoke has long been linked to increased risks for cancer and stroke in adults, and asthma, lung infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in children, according to the America...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • October 21, 2019
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Can More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?

Can More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting exercise capacity may protect the mental functioning of childhood leukemia survivors, according to a new study.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. Due to their disease and treatment, childhood ALL survivors are at increased risk for problems with th...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After Surgery

1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After Surgery

MONDAY, Oct. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid painkillers are prescribed to 1 in 5 patients who get a pacemaker or other implantable heart device, a new study finds.

It included more than 16,500 U.S. adults who had heart devices implanted between 2010 and 2018.

After their procedures, opioids were prescribed to about 20...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 21, 2019
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What Kind of Drinking Can Trigger A-Fib?

What Kind of Drinking Can Trigger A-Fib?

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent drinking is more likely than binge drinking to increase your risk of the most common heart rhythm disorder, a new study finds.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) increases the risk of stroke by fivefold. Symptoms include racing or irregular pulse, palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness,...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Study Uncovers Racial Gaps in Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

Study Uncovers Racial Gaps in Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are significant racial disparities in treatment of U.S. patients with multiple myeloma, a new study shows.

Researchers reviewed nationwide data on 3,504 white, 858 black and 468 Hispanic patients treated from 2007 to 2013.

The average time between multiple myeloma diagnosis and ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic ...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 18, 2019
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Drug Limits Damage of Brain Injury

Drug Limits Damage of Brain Injury

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many brain injury deaths could be prevented by using an inexpensive drug in the critical hours following a head trauma, a new international study finds.

"Traumatic brain injury can happen to anyone at any time, whether it's through an incident like a car crash or simply falling down the stairs,...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight is hard on the heart, but new research shows it may also harm your lungs.

The study found that higher amounts of fat collect in the airways of overweight and obese people, which may help explain why they're more likely to have wheezing and asthma.

In the study, the inves...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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AHA News: Retired? Hardly – at 99, This Pioneering Heart Doctor Still Leading the Way

AHA News: Retired? Hardly – at 99, This Pioneering Heart Doctor Still Leading the Way

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- At 99 years old, most people are not engaging in complex research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Jeremiah Stamler is no ordinary person.

The author and co-author of hundreds of peer-reviewed studies and books, Stamler's cutting-edge research into the ca...

Confusing Medical Bills Tied to Money Woes in Cancer Survivors

Confusing Medical Bills Tied to Money Woes in Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Difficulty understanding health insurance and medical bills may cause financial hardship for cancer survivors, a new study finds.

There is growing evidence that many American adults lack health insurance literacy, which is the knowledge, ability and confidence to obtain, evaluate and use health...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 18, 2019
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The Wellness Boost of a Purposeful Life

The Wellness Boost of a Purposeful Life

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Research has long shown how psychological disorders lead to poor physical health. Now scientists are learning more about the flip side of emotions, how living a purposeful life may have as many physical benefits as inspirational ones.

Having purpose in life is simply believing that your life h...

Cooking With Greens

Cooking With Greens

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's time to go beyond spinach and kale. To really power up your meals with greens, you want to explore the taste and texture of watercress and dandelions. And the following recipes will get from the fridge to your table in minutes.

Watercress is part of the cruciferous family to which kale and...

Mercury in Creams, Feces in Cosmetics: Beware Bargain Beauty Products

Mercury in Creams, Feces in Cosmetics: Beware Bargain Beauty Products

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stocking up on the latest beauty products can be costly. Is it possible to save money and still put your best face forward?

You may luck out and find things on sale at reputable retailers. But beware of prices that seem too good to be true on the internet or from sellers that may not be arou...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • October 18, 2019
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Juul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Flavors of E-Cigarettes

Juul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Flavors of E-Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Juul, which makes the top-selling brand of electronic-cigarettes in the United States, said Thursday it will no longer sell fruit or dessert flavors of its products.

The company's decision comes as it faces widespread criticism that its flavored nicotine products are hooking a generation of t...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 17, 2019
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More Patients With Heart Disease Die at Home Than in Hospital

More Patients With Heart Disease Die at Home Than in Hospital

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a third of U.S. heart patients die at home, which is more than the number who die in the hospital, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on more than 12 million heart disease patients who died between 2003 and 2017. They looked at whether the deaths occurred in a hospital...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 17, 2019
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AHA News: He Used CPR in an Emergency - Then He Became the Emergency

AHA News: He Used CPR in an Emergency - Then He Became the Emergency

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Joe Farrell went to retrieve an errant golf ball when he came upon another player on the ground not breathing. The man's golfing partner was attempting CPR but not performing it properly.

Joe, a physical therapist, took over. He made sure 911 was called before starting chest...

Deaths Due to Suicide, Homicide on the Rise Among U.S. Youth

Deaths Due to Suicide, Homicide on the Rise Among U.S. Youth

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The anger and fear seething throughout the United States could be having a fatal impact on some of the nation's youngest citizens.

More teens and young adults are coming to a violent end in recent years, either at their own hand or another's, new federal data show.

Both suicide and ...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 17, 2019
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Unyielding Stress Plays Role in Blacks' Blood Pressure Woes

Unyielding Stress Plays Role in Blacks' Blood Pressure Woes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chronically high levels of stress may increase black Americans' risk of high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

"Given the disproportionately high burden of hypertension in African-Americans, determining if chronic stress increases the risk of hypertension in this population is an importa...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • October 17, 2019
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Certain Blood Pressure Meds Tied to Suicide Risk in Study

Certain Blood Pressure Meds Tied to Suicide Risk in Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A common type of blood pressure medication might be associated with an increased risk of suicide, a new study suggests.

People taking angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) appear to be more likely to die by suicide, compared to those who take another type of blood pressure drug called ACE inhi...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • October 17, 2019
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