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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

02 Mar

HealthDay Now: How our children are faring in the pandemic

Parent Tracy Compton talks about turning her dining room into a classroom.

01 Mar

Many Women With UTIs Receive Wrong Antibiotics

Nearly half of women with urinary tract infections get inappropriate prescriptions, often for longer than necessary, researchers say.

26 Feb

Very Low COVID-19 Rate Among Dental Hygienists

COVID-19 diagnoses among dental hygienists far below that of other health professionals, researchers say

How Climate Change Could Put More MS Patients in Danger

How Climate Change Could Put More MS Patients in Danger

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When temperatures rise, people with multiple sclerosis need to keep cool. Heat sensitivity is a hallmark of the central nervous system disorder.

So, what happens when warm weather spikes become more frequent because of climate change?

More MS patients end up in the emergen...

What You Need to Know About the New J&J COVID Vaccine

What You Need to Know About the New J&J COVID Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the emergency use of Johnson & Johnson's single-shot coronavirus vaccine, adding a third weapon to the arsenal the United States is building to battle the pandemic.

The overall effectiveness of the J&J vaccine in protecting recipients against any case of COVID-19 (66%) is not as high as t...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • March 2, 2021
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Skipping Mammograms Raises a Woman's Odds for Breast Cancer Death

Skipping Mammograms Raises a Woman's Odds for Breast Cancer Death

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Don't skip your breast cancer screening mammogram.

This is the overarching message of an extended study of more than a half-million Swedish women. Those who missed even one recommended screening mammogram were more likely to die from breast cancer, the study found.

The new...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 2, 2021
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Could ADHD Raise Odds for More Serious Psychiatric Ills?

Could ADHD Raise Odds for More Serious Psychiatric Ills?

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) isn't already tough on a child, new research suggests the condition might also raise the odds for a psychotic disorder later in life.

But parents should not panic.

"I would say that this finding should not<...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 2, 2021
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AHA News: A New Heart at 18 Put Her on a New Path

AHA News: A New Heart at 18 Put Her on a New Path

Jill Hollander was 9 when, during a visit to her cardiologist with her parents, he asked her to step outside so he could speak alone with her parents.

Nonsense, she thought.

"I want to be in the room too," she told them. "It's about me, and I have a right to be here."

Now 40, Hollander vividly remembers that moment. Not because...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • March 2, 2021
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Stressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't Working
Fauci Says U.S. Will Stay With Two Doses of Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines

Fauci Says U.S. Will Stay With Two Doses of Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (Healthday News) -- The United States will stick with its plan to give millions of Americans two doses of the Pfizer and Moderna coronavirus vaccines, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Monday.

The nation's top infectious diseases expert told the Washington Post that shifting to a single-dose strategy for those two...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 2, 2021
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Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic Americans already face higher risks for dementia than the general population. Many also believe they'd get worse dementia care compared to white patients, according to a new Alzheimer's Association special report.

Older Black Americans are about twice as likel...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 2, 2021
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For Some Young Drivers, Smartphone Use Is One of Many Bad Habits

For Some Young Drivers, Smartphone Use Is One of Many Bad Habits

TUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Young drivers who cruise down the highway with a cellphone in hand probably exhibit other risky behind-the-wheel behaviors, a new study suggests.

Talking or texting on a smartphone while driving correlates with a whole range of dangerous driving practices for many young, novice ...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 2, 2021
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Strep Throat Doesn't Worsen Tourette But May Affect ADHD: Study

Strep Throat Doesn't Worsen Tourette But May Affect ADHD: Study

Strep throat doesn't appear to aggravate Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders in youngsters, according to a new study.

But it did find an association between strep infection and increased hyperactivity and impulsiveness among kids with ADHD.

People with chronic tic disorders have unintentional repetitive movements and vo...

Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

The position played in sports like football and hockey isn't associated with risk of a concussion-linked brain disease later in life, a new study suggests.

The number of years played doesn't affect risk of the neurodegenerative disease -- chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- either, researchers found.

CTE has been linked with re...

'Telestroke' Care at Hospitals Is Boosting Patient Outcomes

'Telestroke' Care at Hospitals Is Boosting Patient Outcomes

You've had a stroke and arrive at a hospital, but the stroke specialist is off-duty. Never fear: Telemedicine may help save your life.

Especially during the COVID-19 crisis, so-called 'telestroke' services -- where health workers use video to consult with a stroke specialist who could be miles away -- is helping to lead to better patient o...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 2, 2021
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Face Masks Won't Impede Your Breathing, Study Confirms

Face Masks Won't Impede Your Breathing, Study Confirms

Breathe easy, folks. A new study affirms that wearing a cloth or surgical face mask won't hamper your breathing.

Researchers in Ohio based that conclusion on tests of 50 adults (median age: 33), both with and without masks. Nearly one-third said they had a chronic health condition, such as asthma.

Volunteers' heart rate, oxygen level...

Pot May Not Be the Best Rx for a Migraine

Pot May Not Be the Best Rx for a Migraine

MONDAY, March 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you decide to try pot to relieve your migraine, new research suggests you could be asking for trouble.

In fact, marijuana use was linked to rebound headaches, which can occur when pain medication is overused, scientists noted.

"This study shows that there is some kind of...

Study Debunks Notion That Statin Meds Trigger Muscle Aches

Study Debunks Notion That Statin Meds Trigger Muscle Aches


People taking statin drugs often complain of muscle aches, but a new study finds the medications are unlikely to be the culprit.

The results come from a trial involving patients who had quit taking their statins, or were considering quitting, due to muscle pain.

The researchers found that those aches we...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 1, 2021
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Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

MONDAY, March 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal cord injuries can be devastating to the more than 17,000 Americans who suffer them each year. But many patients may have new reason for hope: Early research suggests infusions of stem cells could help them regain lost sensation and movement.

These improvements may occur wi...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 1, 2021
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Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

Many Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: Study

If you've gone to the doctor for a urinary tract infection (UTI), chances are that you've been given the wrong antibiotic or a longer-than-necessary treatment plan.

That's even more likely if you live in a rural area, researchers say.

A new study of private insurance claims data found that 47% of women were prescribed antibiotics tha...

AHA News: Finally Getting Around to That Annual Physical? Here's What You Might Find

AHA News: Finally Getting Around to That Annual Physical? Here's What You Might Find

Some patients looking to reschedule annual physicals, wellness visits or other routine medical appointments long delayed by COVID-19 first may need to make time to find a new doctor.

Thousands of practices have closed because of the pandemic, a recent survey shows, with thousands more planning to close in 2021. Finding a new doctor means m...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • March 1, 2021
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AHA News: Which Blood Pressure Number Matters Most Might Depend on Your Age

AHA News: Which Blood Pressure Number Matters Most Might Depend on Your Age

Systolic blood pressure is the best way to predict future cardiovascular events and death, irrespective of age, according to new research. But in younger people, diastolic blood pressure could still be important.

Systolic pressure – the upper number in a blood pressure reading – measures how hard the heart pumps blood into arteries. Di...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • March 1, 2021
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Sharp Drop Seen in COVID Testing As New Cases Plateau

Sharp Drop Seen in COVID Testing As New Cases Plateau

MONDAY, March 1, 2021 (Healthday News) -- The amount of COVID-19 testing being done in the United States has fallen by 30 percent in recent weeks, even though testing can curb the spread of coronavirus and spot new outbreaks quickly.

From a high of nearly 14 million tests a week in early January, the pace fell to fewer than 10 million...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 1, 2021
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