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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

14 Nov

Americans Get The Majority Of Their Daily Calories From Ultra-Processed Foods

The more ultra-processed food person eats, the lower their heart health.

13 Nov

Heart Health and Cancer Risk

Heart attack survivors at increased risk of developing cancer.

12 Nov

Young People Who Use Pot 10 or More Days a Month May Negatively Impact Their Health

Frequent use or abuse of marijuana linked to increased risk of stroke and heart rhythm disturbances.

Fish Oil Is Good Medicine for Heart Failure

Fish Oil Is Good Medicine for Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fish oil might help people with heart failure avoid repeat trips to the hospital, a new study suggests.

The findings come from an analysis of a clinical trial first published last year, where researchers tested the effects of fish oil and vitamin D on people's risk of heart disease and cancer...

National Project Will Delve Into How Dogs Age

National Project Will Delve Into How Dogs Age

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Calling all dogs! 10,000 of them, to be exact.

The 40 researchers behind the Dog Aging Project want that many of man's furry companions to be enrolled in a 10-year study of what helps canines live long, healthy lives.

"Aging is the major cause of the most common diseases, like cance...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 14, 2019
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Mindfulness May Be a Balm for Breast Cancer Patients

Mindfulness May Be a Balm for Breast Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women with advanced breast cancer might find mindfulness can ease their pain, anxiety and depression, a new study suggests.

Mindfulness is the ability to keep your mind focused on the present moment.

"Mindfulness helps us relate to our thoughts, emotions and physical symptoms in a d...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 14, 2019
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AHA News: Heart Attack Survivors Who Develop PTSD Don't Always Take Heart Meds

AHA News: Heart Attack Survivors Who Develop PTSD Don't Always Take Heart Meds

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Experiencing a heart attack may be so terrifying that it triggers post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and those who develop PTSD have twice the risk of having a second heart attack.

That's according to new research that suggests this may be because PTSD keeps them from tak...

Experimental Injection May Protect Against Peanut Allergy

Experimental Injection May Protect Against Peanut Allergy

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with peanut allergy must be constantly vigilant to avoid a life-threatening allergic reaction. But researchers report that a new drug injection might offer at least temporary protection against the most severe reactions.

Just one shot of an experimental antibody treatment allowed peop...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • November 14, 2019
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Diabetes Technology Often Priced Out of Reach

Diabetes Technology Often Priced Out of Reach

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While the high price of insulin has gotten a lot of attention lately, it's not the only cost issue facing people with diabetes. New technologies designed to improve blood sugar management often cost too much for people to afford.

Maya Headley, 36, has had type 1 diabetes for 30 years. The ...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • November 14, 2019
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Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children's health. And they're at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world mee...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 14, 2019
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People Who Can't Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia Risk

People Who Can't Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could illiteracy up your odds for dementia?

That's the suggestion of a study that found seniors who couldn't read or write were two to three times more likely to develop dementia than those who could.

The finding "provides strong evidence for a link between illiteracy and dementia ...

For Older Adults, More Exercise Lowers Heart Disease Risk

For Older Adults, More Exercise Lowers Heart Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise lowers older adults' risk of heart disease and stroke, even if they have health problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes, researchers say.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from more than 1 million people aged 60 and older in South Korea. The study partici...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 13, 2019
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Too Few Heart Patients Getting Good Results From Medicines Alone

Too Few Heart Patients Getting Good Results From Medicines Alone

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A rigorous, new international study finds that, despite doctors' best efforts, many heart patients given standard drugs aren't meeting goals to lower their cholesterol and blood pressure levels.

The study involved nearly 4,000 patients, averaging 64 years of age, treated at centers around th...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • November 13, 2019
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Some Headway Made Against 'Superbugs,' but Threat Remains: CDC

Some Headway Made Against 'Superbugs,' but Threat Remains: CDC

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. response to the threat of antibiotic-resistant germs has shown some progress, but these potentially deadly bugs still show no signs of stopping, a new government report warns.

Prevention efforts have reduced deaths from antibiotic-resistant bugs by 18% overall and by nearly 30&#...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • November 13, 2019
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'Cannabis Use Disorder' Up in States That Legalized Recreational Pot

'Cannabis Use Disorder' Up in States That Legalized Recreational Pot

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- States that legalized recreational marijuana have seen an increase in problematic pot use among teens and adults aged 26 and older, a new study finds.

The researchers compared marijuana use in Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon -- the first four states to legalize recreational marijuana...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 13, 2019
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Kidney Injury on the Rise in Women Hospitalized During Pregnancy

Kidney Injury on the Rise in Women Hospitalized During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney damage among U.S. women hospitalized during pregnancy is on the rise, and those women are more likely to die while in the hospital, a new study finds.

Kidney injury during pregnancy increases the likelihood of complications and death in mothers and their babies.

For the ne...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 13, 2019
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More Americans Trying to Lose Weight, But Few Succeeding

More Americans Trying to Lose Weight, But Few Succeeding

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are more motivated to lose weight than ever before, with increasing numbers eating less, exercising, drinking water and trying out new diets.

And it's all for naught.

Folks are heavier than ever despite all this effort, reports a new study.

The proportion of pe...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • November 13, 2019
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AHA News: Heart Problems Ended His NFL Career, But Magic Provides a Second Act

AHA News: Heart Problems Ended His NFL Career, But Magic Provides a Second Act

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Jon Dorenbos was swimming with sharks in Bora Bora when he realized he kept losing his breath. During his 14-year NFL career, he'd never experienced anything like this.

"It felt like I would drown," Jon said.

A month later, in August 2017, Jon was traded from the...

AHA News: Congenital Heart Disease Linked to Neighborhood Pollution, Poverty

AHA News: Congenital Heart Disease Linked to Neighborhood Pollution, Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Infants are more likely to be born with serious heart defects if their homes are in neighborhoods that are polluted or economically deprived, a new study finds.

Congenital heart defects – abnormalities in the heart or nearby blood vessels that arise before birth &ndas...

AHA News: High Blood Pressure Common Among Black Young Adults

AHA News: High Blood Pressure Common Among Black Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- About 1 in 4 young adults has high blood pressure. But few are getting treated, with new research concluding black young adults are especially vulnerable.

In a study that included 15,171 black, Mexican American and white adults, researchers found that nearly 31% of blac...

One-Third of Heart Patients Skip Their Flu Shot

One-Third of Heart Patients Skip Their Flu Shot

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It seems like a no brainer: The flu shot protects heart patients from illness and death, so getting one should be the first thing they do every year before the season starts.

But new research shows that a third of these vulnerable patients don't get vaccinated.

"Patients need to b...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 13, 2019
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Why Are Cardiac Arrests More Deadly on Weekends?

Why Are Cardiac Arrests More Deadly on Weekends?

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your odds of surviving a cardiac arrest long enough to be admitted to the hospital are lower on the weekend than on a weekday, researchers say.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data from nearly 3,000 patients worldwide who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were treated ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 13, 2019
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Cancer Risk May Rise After Heart Attack

Cancer Risk May Rise After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some worrisome news for folks who manage to survive a heart attack: New research suggests they might be far more vulnerable to developing cancer down the road.

People who suffered a heart health scare -- a heart attack, heart failure or a dangerously erratic heart rhythm -- had a more...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • November 13, 2019
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