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Results for search "Health Costs".

25 Nov

Are Drug Costs Making It Harder For Patients To Follow Their Doctors' Orders?

1 in 8 patients skip or delay heart medications due to cost.

30 Oct

America's Health Report Card

Life expectancy is down, teen e-cigarette use is up and health spending hits about $3 trillion.

Health News Results - 148

Many Americans who get recommended colon cancer screening may end up with "surprise" medical bills, a new study suggests.

Looking at insurance claims for more than 1.1 million elective colonoscopies, researchers found that 12% involved out-of-network charges.

That's concerning, the study authors said, because those patients may well have faced bills averaging $400 for a...

Young women with cancer are at a high risk for employment and financial consequences, a new study finds.

"Our study addresses the burden of employment disruption and financial hardship among young women with cancer -- a group who may be at particular risk for poor financial outcomes after cancer given their age and gender," said researcher Clare Meernik, a fellow at the University of...

In rural America, drinking has become particularly deadly for many, a new government report shows.

Deaths related to alcohol use in those regions rose 43% between 2006 and 2018, health officials reported.

Over that time, the rate of deaths went from 11 per 100,000 people to 15 per 100,000. Also, the rate of deaths among women more than doubled, according to researchers ...

Since the passage of "Obamacare," fewer Americans are facing insurmountable medical bills -- but the benefit does not seem to be reaching people with private insurance, a new study shows.

Researchers found that after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, the number of Americans incurring "catastrophic" health care expenses each year dropped -- from 13.6 million in 2010 to 11....

High out-of-pocket health care costs for low- and middle-income Americans with kids have fallen due to "Obamacare," but more needs to be done to reduce their medical-related financial struggles, a new study claims.

The researchers examined data from 2000 to 2017 on more than 92,000 U.S. families with one or more children under 18 and one or more adult parents or guardians.

F...

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown a spotlight on disparities in the U.S. health care system. But the issues are longstanding, and -- as one large study illustrates -- extend into a common elective surgery.

Researchers found that when hip replacement surgery is done at a "safety net" hospital designed to serve the poor and uninsured, patients' risks are higher. Of more than 500,000 Amer...

Adding a newer drug to standard therapy might help control kidney complications caused by the autoimmune disease lupus, a new clinical trial suggests.

The researchers found that adding the drug, called belimumab, improved patients' likelihood of responding to treatment. That meant a reduction in protein in the urine -- a tell-tale sign of kidney inflammation -- and no significant loss...

More than three-quarters of Americans with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience financial difficulties that often prevent them from getting treatment, new research claims.

"Our study results demonstrate the high prevalence of financial toxicity for MS patients and the resulting decisions patients make that impact their health care and lifestyle," said study author Dr. Gelareh Sadigh, an...

Here's evidence that prescription drugs don't have to cost a fortune: New research finds Medicare saved billions as more generic cholesterol-lowering medications became available, even though the number of Americans using the drugs increased.

"One of the most important contributors to our health care costs is expenditure on prescription drugs," said study author Dr. Ambarish Pandey, a...

The daily drug regimen known as PrEP is a nearly foolproof way to prevent HIV infection. But a new study suggests that many high-risk Americans may be giving the medication a pass because of cost.

The warning stems from a pricing analysis that tracked about 2.6 million PrEP prescriptions filled between 2014 and 2018.

The researchers found that during that time frame, PrEP pr...

More than two in five working-age U.S. adults didn't have stable health insurance in the first half of 2020, while more than one-third struggled with medical bills, according to a new survey.

"The survey shows a persistent vulnerability among U.S. working-age adults in their ability to afford coverage and health care. That vulnerability could worsen if the COVID-19 pandemic and relat...

Eating disorders -- such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder -- cost the U.S. economy nearly $65 billion in one recent year, a new report shows.

About 75% of that ($48.6 billion) was due to lost productivity, according to the researchers.

"Our study lays bare the devastating economic impact that eating disorders have in the United States, a country whe...

People with diabetes face a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19, but a new survey reports they have also suffered more economic fallout from the pandemic.

In June, 18% of people with diabetes were out of work compared to 12% of the general population. And one-third of people with diabetes have lost at least some income since the pandemic began versus about 2...

In the United States, many women with chronic medical conditions aren't filling prescriptions or are trying to make their medications last longer due to the cost, a new study finds.

Not filling prescriptions, skipping doses, delaying refills or splitting pills may put their health at risk, the study authors noted.

For the study, researchers collected data on patients in 11...

The COVID-19 pandemic has America's hospitals on the fiscal ropes, with many facing financial ruin without continued aid from the federal government, a new report predicts.

Average hospital margins across the nation could sink to −7% in the second half of 2020 without further help, with half of all hospitals potentially operating in the red, the American Hospital Association...

Health care in the United States is often touted as the best in the world, but Americans seem to be in worse health than their British peers, a new study shows.

Even the richest Americans in their 50s and early 60s had higher rates of diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis and mental health problems than their wealthy British counterparts.

Those who were in the top 10%...

Health insurance plans with high deductibles may be taking a financial toll on Black patients, according to a new study of cancer survivors.

The researchers said the findings point to yet another reason for racial health disparities in the United States: High deductibles may make it harder for Black patients, in particular, to afford medications or see a doctor.

"Just becaus...

The maker of remdesivir, the first drug that showed promise in treating coronavirus infections, will charge U.S. hospitals $3,120 for a patient with private insurance, the drug company announced Monday.

Because of how the U.S. health care system is designed and the discounts that government health care programs like the VA and Medicaid will expect, the price for private insurance comp...

More than 2 million Americans buy prescription drugs from other countries as a way around rising prices in the United States, a new study finds.

The analysis of nationwide survey data showed that 1.5% of adults got their prescription meds from outside the United States between 2015 and 2017.

Immigrants and people who were older or who had inadequate health insurance cov...

Seattle resident Michael Flor's heart nearly stopped when he received a $1.1 million dollar hospital bill for months of COVID-19 treatment.

The 181-page bill listed nearly 3,000 itemized charges -- and didn't include other items likely to make Flor's bill even higher, the 70-year-old told Time.

But one fact provided Flor some solace: Kaiser Permanente, the health care...

Calorie labeling requirements for menus in U.S. restaurant chains could save tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in health care and other costs, a new study claims.

Researchers created a model to assess what would happen if the labeling rule led to moderate calorie reductions among 1 million Americans, aged 35 to 80.

Between 2018, when the law went into effect...

Breast cancer treatment costs are highest among young and middle-age patients with advanced breast cancer.

That's the conclusion of a new analysis of data from women in North Carolina who were treated for breast cancer between 2003 and 2014. Researchers found that the highest treatment costs were among 18- to 44-year-olds with metatastic breast cancer, meaning it had spread to other p...

Out-of-pocket costs for Americans with type 1 diabetes average $2,500 a year, a new study says.

But 8% of patients have more than $5,000 in out-of-pocket costs, possibly due to having high-deductible health insurance plans or significant medical needs, researchers found.

And insulin accounted for only 18% of total out-of-pocket spending. The rest of it included cost ...

Money is the last thing on anyone's mind during a medical emergency, but new research shows many patients could be hit with huge bills for that ambulance drive or helicopter flight to the hospital.

Quick response is crucial for people who have major injuries or require urgent care for serious health problems, and emergency dispatchers don't have time to check patient's insurance detai...

A cancer diagnosis can deliver a double blow -- along with dealing with a serious health crisis, you also need to worry about how your treatment is going to affect your finances.

Nearly three out of four people with advanced colon cancer that spread to other parts of their bodies experienced major financial hardships within a year of starting treatment, a new study found.

...

Beginning next year, people on some Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage Plans who need insulin will be able to access the lifesaving medication for just $35 a month, according to a new plan announced by the White House.

In some cases, the cost may be even lower, President Donald Trump said at a Rose Garden news conference on Tuesday.

"I'm proud to announce that we have r...

Screening to detect potentially deadly heart problems in U.S. college athletes saves lives, researchers say.

And it's also cost-effective. "It can be implemented for much less than the cost of a pair of athletic shoes," said study leader Dr. Kimberly Harmon, of the University of Washington School of Medicine, in Seattle.

Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death amo...

The COVID-19 pandemic has done untold economic damage in the United States, with businesses shuttering and people self-isolating at home to try to slow the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus.

You might think hospitals and health care systems would be immune to this wave of financial ruin, since there's no industry more crucial to America's fight against the pandemic.

<...

Worries over medical bills would prevent 1 in 7 Americans from seeking treatment if they had possible symptoms of COVID-19, a new poll finds.

Of more than 1,000 adults surveyed, 6% -- representing 15 million Americans -- said that during the coronavirus pandemic, they or a family member had been denied care for another health problem.

Asked if they would seek medical att...

If most Americans get COVID-19, the cost of their care could top $650 billion, a new study finds.

To reach that estimate, researchers created computer models that simulated various scenarios.

Each model dealt with patients who developed different symptoms over time and were seen at clinics or in an emergency room. The simulations considered the treatment they would need a...

If you ask Dr. Molly Benedum whether there is a shortage of doctors in America, this is the story she will tell you:

After joining the Appalachian Regional Health System's family practice in North Carolina, she saw an immediate influx of patients -- women in particular -- that reflected both pent-up demand for primary care doctors and the fact that she happened to be the only woman am...

The advent of HIV-suppressing drugs has ushered in a new era of "pre-exposure prophylaxis" (PrEP) that drastically cuts a sexually active person's odds of contracting the virus.

But wider access to PrEP is being threatened by pharmaceutical company efforts to curb the use of cheap, new generic forms of these medicines, researchers argue in a new study.

The study authors said...

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

In a finding that likely applies to emergency rooms across the United States, researchers report that over 10,000 uninsured patients needed lifesaving kidney dialysis at Texas emergency departments in 2017.

Those patients incurred almost $22 million in hospital costs, the University of Texas Health Science Center scientists said.

The kidneys remove waste and fluid from the b...

Over the course of a decade, the net cost of prescription drugs in the United States rose more than three times faster than the rate of inflation, a new study finds.

The net cost of a drug refers to the sticker price minus manufacturer discounts.

Researchers in the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing (CP3) conducted the analysis on net...

The first generic version of Daraprim (pyrimethamine) tablets for the treatment of toxoplasmosis has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

"Today's approval is especially important for populations that are more susceptible to toxoplasmosis infections, such as pregnant women and individuals with HIV or AIDS, by paving the way for more choices in treatment options," FD...

Rising drug costs are hampering the care of patients with debilitating neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's, a new study finds.

Patients are less likely to fill necessary prescriptions as out-of-pocket costs increase, said senior researcher Dr. Brian Callaghan, a neurologist with the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

"It's a pretty predictable ...

Maybe you've gone to Craigslist to find a used car or a secondhand couch, but imagine having to turn to the internet to pay for lifesaving drugs.

It's already happening: A new study found that hundreds of ads were placed on Craigslist for insulin and asthma inhalers during a 12-day period in June 2019.

"This study shines a light on how deeply some patients are struggling to...

The number of people struggling to pay their medical bills declined dramatically during the last decade, as the Affordable Care Act expanded health insurance coverage and financial protection for the sick.

The percentage of families who had problems paying medical expenses in the previous year declined from about 20% in 2011 to 14% in 2018, according to a new report from the U...

You scheduled your surgery and made sure both your doctor and hospital are in your insurer's approved network of providers. Everything went without a hitch -- until a whopper of a bill showed up in the mail for "out-of-network" care during your operation.

The average out-of-network surprise bill tops $2,000, a new study finds. And about 20% of patients who had surgery using a doc...

A large fraction of Americans nearing retirement age are worried they can't afford health insurance now, much less when they quit working to enjoy the good life, a new survey shows.

One in every four people between 50 and 64 are not confident they'll be able to afford health insurance during the next year, and nearly half worry they won't be able to afford coverage once they retire, r...

Two million more Americans didn't seek health care from late 2016 through 2017 because they couldn't afford it and/or lacked insurance, new research shows.

The analysis of data from 2011 through 2017 also found that health care coverage and access improved with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reversed after President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans bega...

If you don't need insulin, you probably haven't paid much attention to its skyrocketing cost, but new research shows that exorbitant drug pricing eventually affects everyone.

The study found that in 2017, Medicare spent nearly $8 billion on insulin. The researchers said that if Medicare were allowed to negotiate drug prices like the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) can, Medic...

The U.S. government aims to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, but skyrocketing medication costs may make that a pipe dream, a new study suggests.

Since 2012, the cost of antiviral treatment for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has jumped 34%. That's nearly four times the inflation rate.

Even with new generic options, initial treatments now top $36,000 per patient per year,...

The Affordable Care Act might have done more than provide more Americans with health insurance: New research suggests accompanying expansions in Medicaid may be linked to higher numbers of low-income people having jobs or going to school.

That's what happened after Michigan expanded its Medicaid under new rules from the Affordable Care Act.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,0...

Despite spending far more on health care than other wealthy nations, the United States has the lowest life expectancy and the highest suicide rate, new research shows.

For the study, researchers at The Commonwealth Fund compared the United States with 10 other high-income nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) -- Australia, Canada, France, Germany,...

Advanced-stage colon cancer diagnoses declined after Massachusetts expanded health insurance coverage, a new study finds.

In 2006, state legislators passed a health insurance reform law with the aim of providing health care access to nearly all residents.

"Colorectal cancer frequently occurs in adults under 65 who are not yet eligible for Medicare. And we know from previous ...

Even though the Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance, the number of Americans who can't afford to see a doctor keeps increasing, a new study shows.

The researchers found that compared with two decades ago, more Americans today say they have skipped a needed trip to the doctor due to costs, despite a roughly 60% increase in people with health insurance.

Many American cancer survivors struggle to pay for their medical care and have to cut back on spending, dip into their savings, or change their living situation.

These problems are more common among those under 65 than among older survivors, a new survey reveals.

Researchers focused on 401 cancer survivors, ages 18 to 64, and 562 who were 65 and older.

Among the you...

Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

"Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much...

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