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Results for search "Tobacco: Chewing Or Snuff".

Health News Results - 6

Smokers may think electronic cigarettes will help them quit, but a new study finds no evidence that's the case.

Researchers found that among Americans who'd recently quit smoking, those who were using e-cigarettes were just as likely to relapse in the next year as non-users were.

And the risk of relapse was actually slightly increased among former smokers who were using any type of ...

Smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products increases heart risks, but that doesn't stop some Americans with a history of heart problems, new research finds.

Many continue to smoke after having a heart attack, heart failure or stroke even though they are aware of the risk.

Nearly 30% of adults with a history of these heart problems smoked when a five-year study began in 2013....

Parents are often clueless when their kids start smoking e-cigarettes, a new study finds.

On the other hand, Mom and Dad usually can tell if their children take up traditional smoking, said researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

Having strict household rules against any form of tobacco is the best form of prevention, researchers found. And those rules ...

E-cigarette use is rising, putting more Americans at risk of blood vessel damage and heart disease, according to three new studies.

In the first study, researchers found that nearly 1 in 20 adults use e-cigarettes.

"Our study may have important public health implications and ramifications for educational strategies aimed at targeting various population segments to inform t...

Tasty flavors entice young people to try e-cigarettes, getting them hooked on what can become a lifetime habit, a new study shows.

"Children and youth prefer sweet flavors. We know that flavors increase appeal to young or inexperienced users," said lead researcher Andrea Villanti, an associate professor with the University of Vermont's Center on Behavior and Health. "Something that ta...

Many inmates in U.S. state prisons who want to quit smoking have nowhere to turn for help, a new study finds.

That increases their risk of smoking-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease and stroke.

And the risk is especially high for black men, who are six times more likely to be imprisoned than non-Hispanic white men. They also have higher rates of tobacco use b...