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Health News Results - 14

If you live with a smoker, breathing in their smoke could increase your risk of oral cancer by more than 50%, a new analysis shows.

The findings highlight the need for more effective programs to prevent people from being exposed to secondhand smoke, the British authors said.

They analyzed five studies from Asia, Europe, North America and Latin America that included a total of nearly...

Fifteen years of widespread vaccination of U.S. children with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is reaping big rewards: A more than 80% drop in new infections has been seen in women and girls under the age of 25.

That could mean an equally big drop to come in a host of dangerous conditions that are linked to HPV infection, including cancers of the cervix, anogenital area and mouth/th...

The same lifestyle habits that protect the heart can also curb the risk of a range of cancers, a large new study confirms.

The study of more than 20,000 U.S. adults found both bad news and good news.

People with risk factors for heart disease also faced increased odds of developing cancer over the next 15 years. On the other hand, people who followed a heart-healthy lifestyle c...

There's another reason to keep your tippling to a moderate level: Alcohol plays a significant role in cancer cases and deaths in the United States, researchers say.

On average, drinking accounted for 4.8% of cancer cases and 3.2% of cancer deaths or about 75,200 cancer cases and nearly 19,000 cancer deaths a year, from 2013 to 2016.

Rates ranged from a high of 6.7% of cancer cases ...

People who began having oral sex at a young age or at greater "intensity" may face an increased risk of a type of throat cancer, a new study finds.

The study, published online Jan. 11 in the journal Cancer, focused on oropharyngeal cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The sexually transmitted infection can, in a small number of people, become persistent and lead...

Cancer survivors are at greater risk of developing another cancer and dying from it, a new study finds.

These new cancers can result from a genetic predisposition, from treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy used to fight the first cancer, as well as from unhealthy lifestyles such as smoking and obesity, according to researchers from the American Cancer Society.

Some of these...

Girls who are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) may drastically cut their chances of developing cervical cancer by age 30, a huge, new study finds.

Researchers found that of more than 1.6 million young Swedish women, those who'd gotten the HPV vaccine were about two-thirds less likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than their unvaccinated peers.

Those odds ...

Want to avoid cancer? Consider brushing and flossing more often.

Why? Folks with bad gums might be at higher risk of developing certain types of cancer, new research suggests.

A history of gum disease appears to increase the risk of stomach cancer by 52% and throat cancer by 43%, according to data from two major long-term health studies.

People who'd lost t...

If you need more than two hands to count the number of lovers you've had in your life, new research suggests you might want to worry about your cancer risk.

People who have had 10 or more sexual partners had higher odds of being diagnosed with cancer than those who were less sexually active, researchers report.

Women with that many sex partners ha...

In a finding that might make the HPV vaccine more palatable to many, new research suggests a single dose may provide just as much protection from cervical cancer as the recommended two to three doses do.

"The vaccine is extremely effective, and can prevent over 90% of nearly 35,000 cancers caused by HPV every year among men and women," explained study author Ashish Deshmukh. He's ...

The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found -- the vaccine is safe.

The two studies included millions of doses of Gardasil 9 vaccine, the only vaccine currently used in the United States for the prevention of HPV-related cancers.

"The data from our study was...

Ten years after radiation treatment for head and neck cancer, some patients may develop problems speaking and swallowing, a new study finds.

These problems are related to radiation damage to the cranial nerves, the researchers explained. The condition is called radiation-induced cranial neuropathy.

"We had always thought that radiation did not damage cranial nerves because t...

The United States could be approaching a state of herd immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus linked to several cancers.

Oral HPV infections declined by 37% among unvaccinated 18- to 59-year-old men between 2009 and 2016, according to a Sept. 10 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That included a decline in infections of HPV16, the...

Learning more about firefighters' increased risk for certain cancers is the aim of a voluntary registry being created by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

It's seeking more than 1.1 million firefighters to participate in the National Firefighter Registry.

"Firefighters put their lives on the line to ensure our safety in emergencies, but ...