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When Presley LeGrande was a member of the competitive cheer team NorCal Elite All Stars in San Jose, California, one of their biggest fans was a teammate's sister. She had her own NorCal uniform and would try to copy the athletes' moves, all from a wheelchair on the sidelines.

"When I was 3 years old, I was able to sign up for cheer and there was no question about my abilities," LeGrand...

"Heat-not-burn" tobacco products, created as an alternative to other types of smoking, may harm the user's heart, researchers report.

These tobacco products -- think IQOS from Philip Morris -- are billed as substitutes for e-cigarettes or traditional smokes. But a new review finds they may be tied to heart and blood vessel harms.

Researchers found the inhalants were linked ...

Wendy Wees suffered a miscarriage during her first pregnancy with husband, Jason Protiva, so they were overjoyed when they passed the nine-week mark of her second pregnancy.

At her 20-week appointment, the couple found out they were having a boy. The doctor noticed something else on the sonogram. Their unborn son had a serious heart defect.

Further tests determined he would be b...

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the United States, said on Wednesday he is "cautiously optimistic" that a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready by year's end.

Against the backdrop of a pandemic that has claimed over 220,000 American lives, Fauci noted that the United States' "strategic approach" to vaccine development appears to be bearing fruit. Six U.S. companie...

Could telehealth help paralyzed stroke victims recover their motor skills faster than they would working directly with a physical therapist?

Yes, claims a new study that found patients who had participated in at least 12 weeks of at-home rehabilitation with live video consultations ("telerehabilitation") scored higher in testing of the recovery of their motor skills than those who had...

Centuries before bacon cheeseburgers, cigarettes and couch potatoes, people had clogged arteries that can lead to heart attack and stroke.

How do we know this? Mummies told us.

No, not the groaning, wrapped-in-gauze, walking-with-arms-straight-out mummies that come to life in scary movies we'll be watching this Halloween season.

For more than a decade, experts have been ...

Dontrez Johnson Jr. is a success story in the making. A first-generation college student, he earned a biology degree from Tennessee State University and is on a fellowship helping improve health in Marion, Alabama. His next stop: medical school and becoming a cardiologist.

He's inspired by his experience seeing relatives die after inadequate hospital care – and he's determined to ...

Persimmons are low in calories and high in fiber – a combination that makes them a good choice for weight control. Their mix of antioxidants and nutrients – including vitamins A and C – makes them ideal for a healthy diet.

But for all of the benefits that come in these colorful, somewhat uncommon fruits, it may be their relative obscurity that makes them an even more v...

Parents are usually pleased when their newborn seems big and strong, but new research suggests that large babies may be at higher risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation later in life.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting more than 40 million people worldwide. People with a-fib have a five times increased risk of stroke.

...

Chanel Davis-Mitchell and her husband, Benji Mitchell, were looking forward to parenthood after the birth of their healthy baby boy, Braxton.

Despite a high-risk pregnancy and a massive amount of fluid weight Chanel gained during the final two months, doctors assured her all would be fine after the delivery.

Then, 11 days after Braxton's birth in May 2016, Chanel and Benji were ...

While growing up in the Philippines, Lady Dorothy Elli witnessed childhood hunger and poverty that left her with lasting impressions.

She has made it her mission to address the problem of food insecurity and the negative impact it can have on the academic and personal well-being of students of all ages.

"Health inequity plays a big role in this," said Lady Dorothy, 19, now a...

Blood clots in the veins – particularly those that break off and travel to the lungs – can be fatal and have become increasingly so. Yet many adults know little about their risks or the growing evidence that healthy habits can help prevent clots.

"A key barrier in the United States is that awareness of this disease is not very good," Dr. Mary Cushman said of the condition kn...

Prescriptions of cholesterol-lowering statins for heart disease patients rose significantly when doctors were prompted to choose whether or not to order them, according to a new study.

It included 82 cardiologists and more than 11,000 patients. Doctors randomly received one of two "nudges," or notifications, in their patients' electronic health records.

One was a "passive ch...

Pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia and miscarriage, may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease later in life, a new study suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 32 reviews that assessed women of childbearing age and their subsequent risk of heart disease. The women in those papers were followed for an average of seven to 10 years.

Several rep...

Heart attack risk increases quickly after a flu-like illness, while stroke risk rises slower, according to new research.

The study, published Oct. 8 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, examined the relationship between the flu, heart attacks and strokes, which all occur more frequently during winter months.

Researchers looked at New York state public hea...

After administering clot-busting drugs to treat a stroke, using blood pressure cuffs to squeeze each arm might aid recovery, a new, small Chinese study suggests.

In the technique -- called remote ischemic post-conditioning -- the flow of oxygen-rich blood is repeatedly interrupted and restored using blood pressure cuffs on the arms. Earlier studies have found that the technique may p...

LGBTQ adults face distinct threats to their heart health – and health care providers can do more to identify and thwart those risks, says a new report that aims to point the way toward better research and care.

The report, issued Thursday as a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, pulls together what scientists have learned about LGBTQ health, highlighting kn...

Continuous positive airway pressure treatment, commonly known as CPAP, can lower heart disease risk in people with prediabetes, according to a new study.

In prediabetes, blood sugar levels are above normal but not high enough to be considered diabetes. CPAP is used to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep. A CPAP machine ...

Maybe it was the meme that pointed out how Shakespeare used his time in quarantine to write "King Lear." Maybe it was all those photos of sourdough bread in your social media feed. Maybe you're just bored.

Whatever the spark – you're ready to take on a hobby.

Good idea, experts say.

"The process of being creative does a whole bunch of really good things for u...

Black people who have a strong sense of psychological well-being may have better heart health, a new study indicates.

It suggests that feelings of optimism and a sense of purpose and control -- hallmarks of psychosocial resilience -- are more important to heart health than where people live, researchers said.

Lead researcher Tené Lewis, an associate professor at Emo...

The coronavirus pandemic and flu season pose a double risk for heart disease patients, so they need to be extra vigilant about their health, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) says.

"Heart disease patients bear a greater burden during the pandemic since they are having to navigate managing their heart health while also protecting themselves from COVID-19, as they are at increase...

Blood pressure among adults decreased significantly during a 45-year period, according to new research that may offer encouragement for the millions who continue to struggle to control their blood pressure.

The study, published Oct. 5 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation , sought to pinpoint the magnitude of blood pressure improvement in the United States betw...

If your husband or wife is hospitalized in intensive care, you're more likely to have a heart attack or other serious heart problem in the next few weeks, a new study warns.

"Spouses of ICU patients should pay attention to their own physical health, especially in terms of cardiovascular disease," said senior author Dr. Hiroyuki Ohbe, a Ph.D. student in the School of Public Health at t...

Belinda Zuniga was searching the classified ads for job notices 14 years ago when a single word caught her attention: stroke.

Her grandmother had just had one. "We had so many questions. Her stroke really disabled her," said Zuniga, a certified nursing assistant. She jumped at the chance to work for BASIC, the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi research project.

Funded ...

As if the misery of hot flashes, night sweats and sleep troubles weren't enough, now new research suggests that women who routinely experience moderate to severe menopausal symptoms have a higher risk of stroke and heart disease.

"This analysis assessed various menopausal symptoms and their association with health outcomes. Women with two or more moderate to severe menopausal symptom...

People with poor heart health have worse perceptions of their patient-doctor relationship, according to a new study that also found overall cardiovascular health is worsening in the U.S.

The research, published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, sought to shed light on cardiovascular health and how it squares with people's impression of their health and their hea...

A transient ischemic attack, often called a mini-stroke, usually doesn't last long or cause permanent damage. But it still needs medical attention, because it may be warning of a future stroke that can have dire consequences.

Research has shown women are less likely than men to be diagnosed with TIAs, and a study published Wednesday in the American Heart Association journal Stroke aimed...

The patients, most of them young, began showing up at hospitals in the spring of 2019. Some were coughing, out of breath or feverish. Some were vomiting or had diarrhea. Some ended up in intensive care, needing oxygen.

Some died.

They had been vaping, and their condition acquired the name EVALI, for e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury. In simple terms, it's ...

Teacher Zach Nelson spent most of his Sunday preparing for the week ahead, working deep into the evening. He put his 5-year-old son to bed, then returned to his laptop to continue with his lesson plans.

Zach felt tired, even dozing off a few times. But it was late, so each time he awoke, it made sense.

Then he awoke in the intensive care unit. Four days later. That made no s...

Young women who suffer a particularly deadly condition after a heart attack are 11% more likely to die from it than men, a new study finds.

Not only that, women aged 18 to 55 are less likely to receive the tests and aggressive treatment that men routinely receive, and are more likely to die in the hospital, the researchers added.

"It's very difficult to understand exac...

The foundation for early heart disease might begin not during childhood or in the years that follow, but in the womb.

Researchers studying nearly 30 years of data from families in Manitoba, Canada, found a strong connection between heart disease risk factors in teens and young adults and their mother's type 2 or gestational diabetes.

"I was surprised at the strength of the a...

Justo Méndez Arámburu's idea to start a nonprofit alternative school in Puerto Rico came to him in a dream.

His 15-year-old daughter, Ana Mercedes, who had died in a car accident a few months earlier, appeared to him and encouraged him to open a school. "How would I do that?" asked the confused father, who was not an educator at the time. His daughter asked him to have fai...

After taking her daughter to softball practice, Kelly Sosnowski popped over to the mall to run an errand.

Walking inside, she felt a heavy pain in her chest and upper back. She paused and the pain let up. But when she started walking again, the pain returned.

She found a place to sit and rest for a few minutes and the pain went away. It reminded her of the feeling from lifting h...

Growing up in Wichita, Kansas, Ngoc Vuong had a wide circle of Vietnamese friends to play with in his neighborhood.

His parents had left Vietnam in the 1990s to build a new home in the U.S., making Vuong and his two older sisters first-generation Americans.

"A lot of my summers were spent hanging out with people who looked like me," Vuong said. "At school, it was a different sto...

From the moment in January when she first heard about the new coronavirus, Suzanne Kathro worried about catching it. In mid-August, she did.

"That's when the ghosting started," said Kathro, 72, of Hot Springs Village, Arkansas.

After she and her husband, Paul, got sick, some of their friends stopped communicating. "Just – poof!" she said. "They are gone. You don't hear fro...

Young athletes who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms should be symptom-free for 14 days and get their doctor's OK before returning to practices or games, according to a leading group of U.S. pediatricians.

An electrocardiogram (EKG) is also recommended for those who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in updated guidance.

"Exercis...

Fewer U.S. women these days are aware that heart disease is the number-one threat to their lives -- especially younger and minority women, a new study finds.

Historically, heart disease was seen as a "man's disease," partly because men tend to suffer heart attacks at a younger age than women do. Yet heart disease is the top killer of women in the United States -- causing about 300,000...

People born with a hole in their heart may lose 20% or more of their exercise capacity as they age, even if the defect is repaired.

A ventricular septal defect is a hole in the wall separating the heart's pumping chambers. It can be surgically closed or left alone. People born with this defect have poorer exercise ability than healthy people.

A new study suggests that ...

We interrupt your latest binge of breaking political news, fear-provoking campaign commercials and angry posts from your favorite pundit to report that politics can be stressful.

That stress can be bad for your health. But – some good news here – you can take steps to manage it.

If the election has your heart racing and stomach churning, you have company. According t...

A cluster of conditions called metabolic syndrome that could lead to heart disease and stroke is becoming more common among Hispanic adults, and experts say there needs to be more research and more work in prevention.

Overall, metabolic syndrome affects about 1 in 3 adults in the United States and puts them at higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to statistics fr...

A test that measures blood flow changes in the brain shows people with high blood pressure are more likely to experience poorer communication between brain regions than those with normal blood pressure, according to a small study.

The research, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, also found those with changes in brain connectivity experienced minor p...

Young women are more likely than their male peers to have a stroke, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed a claims database of insured people in the United States from 2001 to 2014, tallying the number of ischemic, or clot-caused, strokes based on hospital admissions. People with a history of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease were not included in the study.

The data s...

On most Fridays, Angela Crenshaw worked from home.

But the day before, Crenshaw had joined colleagues on a work outing to a horse racetrack to celebrate their manager's 10-year anniversary on the job. She'd even squeezed in a session of hot yoga afterward.

So, to catch up on things, she headed into the office that Friday, making the one-hour trip to her job in the employee relat...

Timely rehabilitation is crucial for stroke survivors, but some may not be receiving it due to the coronavirus pandemic, experts say.

Rehabilitation can help the 795,000 stroke survivors in the United States achieve the best possible recovery, according to the American Stroke Association (ASA).

That's why it's critical to begin rehabilitation within three months of a stroke,...

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?

"The answer is yes," said Dr. Neil Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern Universi...

America's air would become remarkably cleaner if the country accelerated its transition to electric cars that don't rely on fossil fuels, the American Lung Association said in a new report Tuesday.

A full transition to electric cars by 2040 would also result in fewer deaths, asthma attacks, heart attacks, strokes and other health problems related to air pollution, said William Barrett...

Growing up in Colima, Mexico, Lorena Melendez-Chavez remembers there was always nourishing food on the table – beans, rice, legumes, tortillas, cheese, vegetables and fruits – despite her family not having financial resources to spare. Her mother, who grew up on a small farm, also insisted her four children exercise because it was just as important to burn off energy as to eat well....

If you have experienced a heart attack and you have an adversarial personality, new research suggests you might want to consider an attitude adjustment.

An angry outlook may make you vulnerable to a second heart attack, the new study found.

The study included more than 2,300 heart attack survivors, average age 67, who were followed for 24 months. Men accounted for 68% of...

Black adults with hard-to-treat high blood pressure often don't get the right medications or receive counseling about the use of healthy behaviors to lower blood pressure, according to a new study.

Past research shows blood pressure is more difficult to control in Black adults than in white adults, and that an estimated 400,000 strokes, heart attacks and other cardiovascular events amon...

Jules Heningburg was sprinting up hills and playing pick-up basketball about a month after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

He was asymptomatic and not contagious. After quarantining and following proper health guidelines, the Premier Lacrosse League player felt fit and ready to return to the field.

His season ended before it began. The 24-year-old Redwoods LC star left the league...

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