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306 Results for search "Health Care Access / Disparities".

Health News Results - 306

Inflation is putting Americans' health at risk, with nearly 2 in 5 struggling to pay for the care they need, according to a new West Health-Gallup poll.

About 38% -- which translates to an estimated 98 million Americans -- said rising health care prices had caused them to skip treatments, delay buying prescription drugs or pay for their care by borrowing money or cutting back on driving, ...

Where you live may affect your fertility, a new study suggests.

People who live in economically deprived neighborhoods are about 20% less likely to conceive, compared to people from areas with more resources, researchers said.

Investments in deprived neighbo...

Babies who are white appear to get diagnostic appointments for cystic fibrosis earlier than babies of several other races and ethnicities, new research shows.

This can cause gaps in care and outcomes.

While it is recommended that infants who have an initial positive screening for cystic fibrosis be furt...

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When they suffer a heart attack, Black and Hispanic patients in the United States receive subpar care compared with white patients, new research reveals.

The study of more than 87,000 insured

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • A federal lawsuit out of Texas could end access to free lifesaving preventive health care services for nearly 168 million people in the United States with private insurance, a new report suggests.

    Kelley v. Becerra seeks to overturn the

  • By Robin Foster and Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporters
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  • July 27, 2022
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  • THURSDAY, July 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Better have some savings stored up before you rush to the delivery room: A new analysis shows the average out-of-pocket expense for delivering a child in the United States is nearly $3,000, even if you're insured.

    Other studies have looked at the costs for specific services, such as

  • Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 21, 2022
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  • The most common test of lung function, spirometry, probably is not detecting signs of emphysema in some people with the lung ailment, a new study says.

    In particular, Black men are at greater risk of suffering from undiagnosed emphysema, since the way spirometry results are interpreted ap...

    The nation's opioid epidemic is hitting minority groups the hardest, with the latest government study reporting the steepest increases in overdose deaths among Black Americans and American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    While overdose deaths climbed 24% among whites in 2020, still an historic high, they jumped 44% ...

    Deaths from heart-related causes have dropped over the past 20 years, though differences persist by race and ethnicity as well as where people live and their access to care.

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), which partially funded the research, detailed the results of three papers. The findings were published July 18 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation

    Not having health insurance can be deadly if cancer strikes: A new study shows that people without it are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage cancers and face lower survival rates than their insured peers.

    The difference was particularly marked for six cance...

    Early in the pandemic, scores of Americans bought pulse oximeters to help determine how sick they were while infected with COVID-19, but new research finds the devices often miss dangerously low blood oxygen levels in Black veterans.

    This is not the first time such inaccuracies...

    Getting a blood cancer diagnosis is devastating for young people, but it is also far more deadly if the patient is Black, new research shows.

    The new study, which looked at outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), highlights an urgent need to understand racial and ethn...

    Death rates for U.S. pregnant women or those who had just delivered jumped sharply during the first year of the pandemic, new research shows.

    While U.S. death rates increased overall by 16% in 2020, for pregnant and early postpartum women it was officially even higher, at 18%, according to U.S. National Center for Health Statistics data.

    Yet, that's not the whole picture: Even high...

    If a national abortion ban follows a Supreme Court ruling overturning the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade decision, U.S. maternal deaths would likely increase by 24%, new research suggests.

    That assessment, based on newly released 2020 data, is a 14% increase over an earlier estimate based on 2017 d...

    Shortly after news broke in May that Roe v. Wade was in danger of being overturned by the Supreme Court, internet searches for abortion pills surged, a new study shows.

    On May 2, a leaked draft ruling indicated that the court was poised to strike down the 1973 ruling that guaranteed a woman's...

    Even though Black people may be more likely to live near a hospital with a certified stroke center, those who need the specialty care are still more likely to receive it at a hospital with fewer resources.

    And this can hurt the...

    Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

    Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black and Hispanic women were all more likely to wait over a month ...

    Medically supervised exercise programs can do heart patients a lot of good, but few people of color take part in them -- regardless of income, new research finds.

    The study, of more than 100,000 U.S. patients, found that while all were eligible for cardiac rehabilitation, only...

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn a woman's right to have an abortion marks a "very dark day in health care" that will leave patients at risk and doctors afraid to act, leaders of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said Friday.

    "It is a dark day indeed for t...

    Despite improvements in treatment for heart attacks, care lags behind for women.

    Women are still less likely to receive timely care, according to a new study that reviewed 450,000 patient records for two types of heart attacks.

    "Heart attack treatments have come a long way but timely acc...

    Suicide rates are rising more slowly in states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

    "Suicide is a public health problem, and our findings indicate that increasing access to health care -- including mental health care -- by expanding Medicaid eligibility can play an imp...

    In yet another sign that the pandemic has exacerbated disparities in health care, researchers report that the life expectancy of Native Americans plummeted by nearly five years as the new coronavirus raged across the country.

    The loss in longevity was far greater than any other ethnic group and about three times h...

    There is a "staggering" gap between the number of Americans who need care for anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions and those who can actually get it, a new survey shows.

    In all, 42% of U.S. adults who needed care in the previous 12 months did not get it because of costs and other barriers, according to the online survey from the National Council for Mental Wellbeing. Nea...

    High-tech devices and communication helped ease the impact of COVID-19 lockdowns on children with type 1 diabetes, researchers said in a new study.

    Pandemic shutdowns caused significant disruptions in health care, and previous studies have shown that diabetes patients had worse blood sugar (glucose) control and more difficulty accessing care during the early days of the pandemic.

    Bu...

    Even with Roe v. Wade still the law of the land, primary care doctors in the United States have difficulty prescribing U.S. federally approved abortion pills, a new study finds.

    Getting in the way is a complex combination of state and federal regulations, insufficient training and institutional hurdles, researchers found when they surveyed dozens of doctors.

    "As family physicians pr...

    Race and ethnicity matter when battling colon cancer, with young white patients facing notably better odds than Black, Hispanic or Asian patients, new research warns.

    A look at colon cancer survival among Americans younger than 50 turned up a glaring discrepancy: Survival five years after diagnosis improved to nearly 70% among white patients over two decades, but was less than 58% among B...

    With Roe v. Wade hanging in the balance and nearly half of all American states ready to practically ban abortion if the leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court stands, the realities of giving birth in this country are being put under a microscope, and for good reason.

    "Today, [America] is considered the most dangerous developed nation in the world in which to give birth," said St...

    Americans with sickle cell disease who have private insurance face average out-of-pocket costs of $1,300 a year and a lifetime total of $44,000, new research reveals.

    That means that their out-of-pocket expenses are nearly four times higher compared to people without the inherited blood disorder, the

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2022
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  • A new report on how Black Americans are faring against cancer offers up a decidedly mixed picture.

    The risk that a Black man or woman in America will die from cancer has steadily declined over the last two decades, the newly published research found.

    Unfortunately, that risk...

    Tens of millions of American women will have to journey much farther for abortion care if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade as expected, researchers say.

    Dozens of states would make abortion illegal in the wake of such a ruling, which would force about 24 million women to travel at least 150 miles more than they do now to obtain abortion care.

    "There are already huge disp...

    When Hispanic Americans arrive in the emergency room with chest pain, they have to wait longer for care than other people with the same symptoms, a preliminary study finds.

    Chest pain, a potential sign of heart attack, is one of the leading reasons people end up in an ER. But the new findings suggest that Hispanic patients may face unnecessary delays in either receiving care, being admitt...

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

    "

    Uterine cancer deaths have been increasing in the United States, particularly among Black women. Now, research appears to pinpoint a cause.

    A rare but aggressive type of cancer known as Type 2 endometrial cancer is more difficult to treat and was responsible for 20% of cases and 45% of deaths identified in the study.

    Deaths from this type of cancer increased by 2.7% per year during...

    Women and people of color with chest pain - the most common symptom signaling a heart attack - face longer waits in U.S. emergency departments than men and white people do, new research reveals.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 4,000 patients, aged 18 to 55, seen for chest pain at emergenc...

    Patients with atrial fibrillation usually receive blood thinners to reduce their stroke risk, but these drugs are under-prescribed to Black Americans, a new study reveals.

    When they leave the hospital, Black patients are 25% less likely than whites to be prescribed

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 3, 2022
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  • Use of a high-tech radiation cancer treatment called proton beam therapy (PBT) has increased overall in the United States, but Black patients are getting it less often than white patients, two ne...

    After childbirth, some women who received an epidural for pain will develop a debilitating headache. But minority women are less likely than white moms to receive the treatment that can provide relief, according to a new study.

    Researchers also found that even when women from minority groups received this care, it was more likely to be delayed.

    "There's a gap in the quality of care ...

    Insufficient vitamin D may play a role in breast cancer, especially among minority women, new research indicates.

    Black and Hispanic American women with low vitamin D levels have a higher risk of breast cancer than those with sufficient vitamin D levels, researchers found.

    The findings sugge...

    Black, Hispanic and Asian Americans have an increased risk of being diagnosed with dementia as they age -- for reasons that are not entirely understood, a large new study finds.

    The study, of nearly 1.9 million older U.S. veterans, found that compared with their white counterparts, Black vets were 54% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over a decade. That risk was nearly doubled am...

    Black Americans are far less likely to be included in clinical trials of pancreatic cancer drugs than white Americans, and eligibility criteria are a significant factor in that gap, according to a new study.

    "The standard of care in cancer treatment is informed by studies conducted with predominantly non-Hispanic white patients," said study author Dr. Jose Trevino, chairman of surgical on...

    THURSDAY, April 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) --The nursing home industry is awash in ineffective care and staffing shortages, claims a new report that calls for sweeping changes in an industry whose failures have only been exacerbated by the pandemic.

    Experts from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine minced no words in in their 605-page

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 7, 2022
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  • More than 10,000 American lives have been saved since lung cancer screening was introduced for high-risk people who are over 55 and have a history of smoking, a new study shows.

    But many poor people and those in ethnic/racial minority groups are still missing out on the benefits of screening for the world's leading cause of cancer death, researchers noted.

    To assess the impacts of t...

    Special needs children often require out-of-network care from specialists, which means more out-of-pocket costs and extra stress for families, a new study finds.

    "In the U.S., the reality is that the more health care needs you have, especially from specialists, the greater chance you will find your needs won't be met, even if you have private insurance coverage," said lead author Wendy Xu...

    Nearly 60 million Americans live in "dental deserts," while many more can't afford basic dental care even if it is available.

    Enter dental therapists.

    New research suggests these newly minted health care professionals could help more people get the oral hea...

    Severe COVID can inflict heavy physical damage on patients, but many recovering from their infection also take a financial hit, a new study finds.

    Up to 10% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 are billed $2,000 or more six months after leaving the hospital, even when insurance providers waive their charges, researchers report.

    "Bills for post-discharge care can be large for some...

    Here's a compelling reason to shed those extra pounds: A new study finds that middle-aged people who are obese, or even simply overweight, may face more health problems down the road.

    The study, of nearly 30,000 men and women, found that the more people weighed around age 40, the greater their odds of chronic health conditions after age 65. And

  • Amy Norton
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  • March 21, 2022
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  • Most medical debt will be dropped from Americans' credit reports as of this summer, the top three credit reporting agencies said Friday.

    The announcement by Equifax, Experian and TransUnion comes as medical bills have become the largest source of personal debt in the United States, ...

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine has become a humanitarian crisis.

    More than 3 million people have fled as refugees into neighboring countries, while thousands of civilians who remain in Ukraine have been injured by Russian shelling and missile attacks.

    In response, relief organizations have flooded the area to provide health care and aid to the suffering.

    Want to contribute?

    Bringing home a baby should be an exciting and blissful time, but for many new parents, colossal out-of-pocket costs for pregnancy and delivery take the joy out of this milestone.

    Some low-income families spend close to 20% of their annual income on medical costs during the year of pregnancy and birth, a new study found.

    "Being pregnant and delivering a baby puts many families at fi...