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13 Dec

Does ‘Baby Talk’ Really Help Your Baby Learn to Speak?

Baby talk may be a key component in helping babies form words, researchers say.

Health News Results - 1240

More than 1.1 million American kids were diagnosed with COVID-19 during the week ending Jan. 20, new data show.

That's 17% higher than the 981,000 cases diagnosed the week before and double the number from two weeks before that.

"As we approach the two-year anniversary of the pandemic, cases of COVID-19 among children and adolescents are the highest they have ever been," said Dr. Mo...

Although they report difficulty breathing and discomfort while wearing a face mask, most people with asthma still use them in public places during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

University of Illinois Chicago researchers conducted an online survey of more than 500 adults with asthma. They found that 84% report...

Remember when everyone was disinfecting their groceries at the start of the pandemic, fearful that the new coronavirus could be spread simply by touching a surface on which the virus had landed?

New research confirms that much of that cleaning was unnecessary because people are unlikely to get COVID-19 from contaminated surfaces.

“Early on in the pandemic, there were studies that ...

Pfizer Inc. announced Tuesday that it has launched a trial that will compare its existing COVID-19 vaccine against a new version tailored to beat back the highly contagious Omicron variant.

"While current research and real-world data show that boosters continue to provide a high level of protection against severe disease and hospitalization with Omicron, we recognize the need to be prepar...

It has begun to feel like a pandemic that will never end, but public health experts now say the Omicron variant may be ushering in a "new normal," where COVID-19 becomes an endemic, but manageable, disease.

"I do feel that we are moving into a transition phase in the pandemic, and I do th...

When American kids do downhill skiing or snowboarding, they almost always wear a helmet, their parents say, but they're far less likely to do so when cruising down a neighborhood hill on a sled.

That puts them at risk for serious head injuries, experts warn.

“Because sledding is so common, parents may overloo...

Some recreational pot shops are using tricks from the old playbooks of alcohol and tobacco companies to target underage users on social media, a new study reports.

Despite state laws restricting such marketing, researchers found marijuana retailers on social media promoting their wares with posts that:

  • Featured cartoon characters like Snoopy, SpongeBob SquarePants, and Rick and...

Herd immunity against COVID-19 is unlikely, and coping with the disease will likely hinge on vaccination, treatment and ensuring adequate hospital capacity, a new study conducted in Los Angeles County claims.

With herd immunity, most people have antibodies from vaccination or prior infection, so a virus has...

Some arthritis drugs may reduce the effectiveness of COVID vaccines, according to the Arthritis Foundation, which also offers advice on booster shots.

Research is limited, but evidence suggests that disease-modifying

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 21, 2022
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  • As air pollution worsens, fruits, flowers and the creatures that pollinate them could pay a price.

    That's the takeaway from British researchers who used special equipment to control levels of two common pollutants — diesel exhaust and ozone — in a field of black mustard plants, and then monitored pollinating insects over two summers.

    "We knew from our previous lab studies that ...

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A seemingly endless wait in an emergency department can be taxing for many reasons, but new research suggests that long delays in being admitted to the hospital may even raise a patient's risk of death within the following 30 days.

    Why? One possible reason: A crowded ER might mean care happens in suboptimal spaces, said study...

    Breastfeeding moms can rest easier: New research finds no evidence their milk transmits the virus that causes COVID-19 to their babies.

    “Breast milk is an invaluable source of nutrition to infants," said lead author Dr. Paul Krogstad of the University of California, Los Angeles.

    "In our study, we found no evidence that breast milk from mothers infected with COVID-19 contained inf...

    It can happen so fast.

    One moment, a family is eating dinner together like usual. Soon after, they go off to do other things before being brought back together by a child's scream.

    That is what unfolded in the Beckman home in State College, Pa., one October evening three months ago. The youngest of the family's three children, 3-year-old Hazel, suffered a serious friction bur...

    Despite earlier concerns that at-home COVID-19 tests might be less accurate than PCR tests, new research in U.S. children and teens adds to evidence that the rapid tests are highly accurate.

    The scientists said the accuracy of the tests — which can be used at home and in schools and provide quick results — is similar to that of

    You've gotten vaccinated. You've gotten boosted. You wear your mask, maintain social distancing, wash your hands — you do everything you've been asked to do to protect yourself and others.

    And you are completely fed up.

    If that description sounds like you, you might be part of a contingent of people who consider themselves "vaxxed and done" with the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 17, 2022
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  • Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

    Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately before.

    The pattern is not surprising, said lead researc...

    Flu vaccines protect children against serious illness, even when the vaccine doesn't match the circulating flu virus, according to a new study that reinforces the importance of flu shots.

    Flu viruses are constantly changing, and the effectiveness of flu vaccines can be influenced by the similarity between the viruses used in vaccine production and the viruses circulating in a given flu s...

    Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    Think you're safe from lung cancer because you've never smoked? Think again.

    While cigarette smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, it's possible to get the disease without ever lighting up.

    "Anyone with lungs can get lung cancer," said Dr. Missak Haigentz Jr., chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick.

    ...

    A three-month sexual abstinence rule for blood donations from sexually active gay and bisexual men should be dropped by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, critics urge as the country struggles with a blood shortage.

    Right now, based on the slight chance of infection with HIV, men who have sex with men must abstain from sex with other men for 90 days before being eligible to donate blo...

    One in 10 people with COVID-19 could still be infectious beyond 10 days, and some could remain so for as long as two months, a new study suggests.

    U.K. researchers reported that a new test can detect whether the coronavirus is potentially still active. They used it to analyze samples from 176 people who ...

    Face masks are touted as a key tool in preventing the spread of COVID-19, and a new study offers more proof that they work.

    Florida researchers found face masks cut the distance that airborne pathogens such as the coronavirus can travel by more than half.

    The findings suggest that some

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 14, 2022
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  • Here's more evidence that marijuana may make driving more dangerous: As pot has been legalized in more countries and states, a greater number of people are driving intoxicated by the drug and crashing, researchers report.

    THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, has been detected in twice as many injured Canadian drivers since 2018, when

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 13, 2022
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  • Wildfires and rising temperatures are exposing more and more Americans to an air pollution double-whammy of smoke and smog, a new study warns.

    Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of people in western states have been simultaneously exposed to high levels of two kinds of air pollution: Fine-particle pollution generated by

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Secondhand vapor from electronic cigarettes is harmful to others, causing bronchitis symptoms and shortness of breath in young bystanders, a new study reports.

    Secondhand exposure to vapor increased teens' risk of bronchitis symptoms by 40% and shortness of breath by 53%, according to findings published online Jan. 10 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 11, 2022
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  • It's a COVID phenomenon that had, until now, gone relatively unnoticed: You can be infected with COVID-19 and the flu at the same time.

    Thanks to the internet, it even has a name -- "flurona." And it will likely happen much more often this particular winter, as the flu season kicks into gear and the highly contagious

  • Serena McNiff HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 10, 2022
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  • A temporary falloff in the number of Americans who kill themselves and others with guns is over, newly released U.S. government data show.

    "Firearm homicides and suicides are an urgent public health concern in the United States," said Scott Kegler, lead author of a new study of gun violence ...

    A review of cases from 465 U.S. hospitals underscores the protection provided by COVID-19 vaccines.

    The new review -- by researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health -- found that vaccinated adults who got breakthrough infections rarely got severely ill. Respiratory failure, the need for treatment i...

    Former members of President Joe Biden’s transition team are calling for a new long-term strategy that envisions a world in which humans learn to live with the new coronavirus.

    Six former advisers published three opinion articles Thursday in the Journal of the American Medical Association detailing wha...

    Far fewer kids might develop asthma if there were less traffic pollution, suggests a new study that researched the issue worldwide.

    "Our study found that nitrogen dioxide puts children at risk of developing asthma and the problem is especially acute in urban areas," said study author Susan Anenberg, a professor of environmental and occupational health at George Washington University in Wa...

    Cities worldwide are shrouded with air pollution -- and it’s killing people.

    A new modeling study found that 86% of people living in cities throughout the world -- a total of 2.5 billion people -- are exposed to fine particulate matter at levels that exceed the World Health Organization’s 2005 guidelines.

    In 2019, this urban air pollution led to 1.8 million excess deaths, acco...

    If giving up tobacco is one of your New Year’s resolutions, know that it won't be easy but don't give up. Fifty million ex-smokers in the United States are proof that it can be done.

    "More than 70% of smokers want to quit smoking and 40% will make an attempt this year, but only between 4% and 7% can quit without support," Jennifer Folkenroth, national senior director of tobacco programs...

    Chatting with your doctor via video about your health issues works just as well as an in-person office visit, at least when it comes to managing chronic illnesses, a new review suggests.

    Replacing office visits with video checkups delivered results that were just as effective for patients being treated for conditions like diabetes, respiratory illnesses, chronic pain, heart problems and n...

    The best time during pregnancy to get a COVID-19 vaccine appears to be right now.

    A new study found that antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus in nearly 1,400 women and their babies at the time of delivery didn’t vary dramatically based on when a woman go...

    Nearly all countries agree: Smoking is bad, and getting people to kick the habit is a worthy public health goal.

    But no country has ever attempted what New Zealand is about to try: an outright ban on all cigarette sales.

    The plan is to let those who already smoke retain the right to keep buying cigarettes if they wish, but as of 2023, anyone under 15 would be prohibited for life fro...

    Researchers have confirmed that some white-tailed deer in Texas have COVID-19.

    The scientific community has been alarmed by the prospect of deer becoming new hosts for COVID since July, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture found antibodies in white-tailed deer in Illinois, Michigan, New York and Pennsylvania<...

    Kid-friendly flavored e-cigarettes are still widely available online and in stores, despite a federal judge's ruling that should have pulled the products off store shelves by early September, a new report shows.

    The judge's ruling follows on U.S. Food and Drug Administration action that is nearly two years old.

    Citing risks to vulnerable children, the FDA first announced in January...

    Taking to the skies for a long-awaited holiday?

    Choose your seat on the plane wisely and don't overlook familiar steps like keeping your mask on to reduce your odds for getting COVID-19 or another contagious disease, experts suggest.

    “Spacing is an obvious challenge on airplanes, especially when the planes are filled at or near capacity over the holiday season. So anything that c...

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people — 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide...

    Lockdowns keep people home for a few weeks, but they lose their luster after a few months, claims a new study that comes as many countries consider a return to lockdowns to slow the renewed spread of COVID-19.

    The findings could be used by policymakers when deciding whether to impose lockdowns, the research...

    Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    Tempting as it is to mingle with friends and relatives, anyone with cancer should take extra precautions this holiday season to avoid COVID-19. Their families also need to be cautious to help protect them, experts say.

    Yale Cancer Center reminds people who are living with cancer that the disease and treatments can put a patient at risk for serious illness from the coronavirus, even if th...

    After former President Donald Trump said he had gotten a booster shot during an event in Texas this week, boos erupted from parts of the crowd.

    The incident occurred Sunday during a stop of Trump's tour with former Fox News host Bill O'Reilly and was recorded in a video tweeted by O'R...

    Determining whether a young person with autism is ready to drive can be tricky for their health care providers.

    That's the upshot of a new survey that included 78 pediatric physicians, psychologists and other providers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

    Half of the respondents said they routinely...

    Of course kids make up the bulk of people at schools, but new evidence shows that requiring masks for adults working at schools greatly reduces the severity of COVID-19 outbreaks.

    In the study, the researchers found that children were most often the first identified cases in schools. However, outbreaks in schools were more severe when an adult was the first case, and mask wearing by adul...

    The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a surge in new gun owners across the U.S., a new study finds.

    The data shows that between January 2020 and April 30 of this year, 5.1 million Americans bought their first guns, following 2.4 million who did so in 2019.

    The numbers are concerning, experts said, because when guns are brought into a home for the first time, everyone who lives there i...

    There's a very low risk of heart inflammation after getting the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, according to a new study that adds to previous research supporting the safety of the shots.

    The two mRNA vaccines had been linked in some studies with an increased risk of

    Proctor & Gamble has voluntarily recalled several dry shampoo sprays and hair conditioner spray products with brand names Pantene, Herbal Essences, Aussie and Waterless because of benzene contamination.

    This follows an earlier recall of some aerosol spray Old S...

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

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