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Health News Results - 1469

U.S. health officials are investigating whether a specific brand of over-the-counter eyedrops are behind one death and dozens of bacterial infections in several states.

The infections have not been traced to preservative-free EzriCare Artificial Tears, but a majority of people who became ill reported using the drops, the U.S. Center...

A variety of ready-to-eat sausage and charcuterie products are being recalled because they may have come into contact with surfaces that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes.

The bacteria can cause an invasive infection and is especially dangerous in pregnant women, older adults and those with weakened immune systems.

Daniele International LLC, based in Rhode Island,...

To fight an urgent opioid overdose crisis, a Canadian province took an unusual step on Tuesday.

British Columbia decriminalized small amounts of several hard drugs.

This includes up to 2.5 grams of cocaine, heroin and fentanyl, the province's Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions said in a statement

Carbon monoxide is a silent, odorless killer, but even during winter heating season, it's possible to stay safe.

This dangerous gas is produced when fuels burn incompletely.

This can happen in furnaces, both gas- and wood-burning fireplaces, space heaters and vehicles that burn fossil fuel. It’s also possible in water heaters, gas clothes dryers and stoves, as well as other equipm...

Longstanding restrictions on blood donations from gay or bisexual men could soon shift towards a more nuanced policy, where such men are asked about sexual partners and practices instead, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Friday.

Specifically, gay men who are in monogamous relationships will no longer be required to abstain from sex for any period of time before donating to ...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed stricter limits on levels of lead in infant food products.

The agency announced draft guidance for manufacturers that would lower allowable lead levels in processed foods meant for infants and children 2 years and younger.

The change could reduce dietary exposure to lead, which can cause neurological and developmental harm, the FDA ...

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2023 (HealthDay News) – “Pharma bro” Martin Shkreli may have violated a judge’s order banning him from being involved in the pharmaceutical industry, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced Friday.

Shkreli, who was convicted for an illegal scheme to maintain a monopoly on the lifesaving toxoplasmosis drug Daraprim, could now be held in contempt of court for fo...

The pandemic brought the utility of testing wastewater to gauge viral spread to the fore.

Now, experts at the independent National Academies of Sciences (NAS) have issued a report outlining a roadmap for the broader surveillance of Americans' wastewater.

The report "reviews the usefulness of comm...

If a study conducted at one St. Louis hospital is a good indicator, the COVID pandemic is tied to a surge in childhood injuries and deaths due to firearms.

Black children and those in low-income households were at greater risk, according to the University of Missouri-led study.

“We found a significant increase in pediatric firearm injury rates during the pandemic compared to the ...

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2023 (HealthDay News) – Nearly one quarter of hospitalized people experience a harmful event during their stay, a new study finds.

However, most of the bad outcomes are not preventable because they’re related to known side effects from medications or risks of surgery. The findings were published Jan. 11 in the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2023
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  • While COVID-19 vaccine acceptance rose around the world between 2021 and 2022, wide gaps remain, according to new research.

    Teams from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain (ISGlobal) and City University of New York (CUNY) also noted the need to address vaccine hesitancy with tailored communication strategies.

    “The pandemic is not over, and authorities must urgently a...

    Two companies are issuing new recalls on Monday for millions of previously recalled rocking sleepers for infants, with about 115 infant deaths possibly linked to use of the sleepers so far reported.

    With both products, the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Sleepers and the Kids2 Rocking Sleepers, infants have rolled from their back to their stomach or side while unrestrained, in addition to pos...

    Following the deaths of 15 infants, families are advised to immediately stop using all models of Kids2 Rocking Sleepers, according to a second recall notice.

    Four of those 15 babies died after the first recall notice, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported.

    The company is recalling 694,000 Rocking Sleepers. Parents can contact the Kids2 company for a refund.

    For the first time in a decade, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed strengthening standards on fine soot in the air, a known contributor to serious health issues.

    Under the new proposal, standards for fine particulate pollution, known as PM 2.5, would change from a level of 12 micrograms per cubic meter to a level between nine and 10 micrograms per cubic meter. The stand...

    When the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling last June, many feared that abortion bans would jeopardize the health of pregnant women.

    Several months later, a conservative group known as the Alliance Defending Freedom sue...

    On Thursday, ZLINE Kitchen and Bath recalled certain models of its gas kitchen ranges because the oven can emit dangerous levels of carbon monoxide while in use, potentially causing serious injury or death.

    U.S. communities with higher Hispanic, American Indian or Black populations also have the highest concentrations of metal in public water systems, new research reveals.

    Researchers from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City found significantly higher arsenic and uranium levels in public drinking water in Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native communities...

    In some parts of the United States, young men face a higher risk of dying from gun violence than if they'd gone to war in Afghanistan and Iraq, a new study reports.

    Young men living in certain high-violence ZIP codes in Chicago and Philadelphia run a greater risk of firearm death than military personnel who served in recent U.S. wars, according to findings published online Dec. 22 in

    Air pollution is plaguing the world's oldest subway system, a new study warns, with high levels of tiny metal particles found in dust samples throughout the London Underground.

    Whether these particles actually pose a risk to human health remains an open question, British researchers acknowledge. But experts say it's happening in subway systems elsewhere, including the United States.

    <...

    As the United States moves towards a world in which electric vehicles (EVs) have fully replaced fossil fuel-driven engines, can Americans look forward to reliably cleaner air and better health?

    Absolutely, a new study predicts.

    By 2050, researchers say, th...

    Mpox cases are down significantly in the United States, prompting the federal government to plan not to renew an emergency designation for the virus when it expires late next month.

    “Given the low number of cases today, HHS does not expect that it needs to renew the emergency declaration when it ends on January 31, 2023,” Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said i...

    The Laundress, a laundry and cleaning products company, has recalled nearly 8 million of its products over concerns they may be contaminated with various bacteria.

    The bacteria include Burkholderia cepacia complex, Klebsiella aerogenes and multiple different species of Pseudomonas. So far, testing has identified these bacteria in certain recalled products, inclu...

    Winter weather brings with it plenty of hazards, including risks from carbon monoxide poisoning, and fires.

    But the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) offers suggestions for staying safe on those cold winter nights.

    When storms knock out power...

    If you've ever left a medical appointment confused, it's probably not you: A new study finds that the medical jargon doctors use can be completely misunderstood by patients.

    Common medical lingo that makes perfect sense to doctors often gets lost in translation when conveyed to laypeople, the new research found. It turns out that many people mistakenly believe it's good news if a tum...

    Once a year, giant motorcycle rallies ride into places like Daytona Beach, Fla., and Sturgis, S.D., bringing hundreds of thousands of people, an economic boost -- and a wave of crash-related deaths.

    That means more organs available for donation and the need to be prepared, according to a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 29, 2022
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  • It's not too late to get the latest COVID-19 booster shot.

    Whether it's the bivalent vaccine from drug maker Pfizer or from Moderna, the shots offer more protection against symptomatic infection, public health officials reiterated at a White House briefing on Tuesday.

    However, since the vaccines debuted in September, only 13% of American adults have gotten the updated boosters, wh...

    The whole family — even the youngest members — can take part in Thanksgiving's hours of food preparation by following some safety tips.

    The nation's leading pediatrics organization offers some holiday advice for families with young children.

    “There's a lot of excitement and joy surrounding meal preparation at this time of year, but it also can be stressful,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 23, 2022
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  • Research in wild bats is reinforcing a notion crucial to stopping future pandemics: When wildlife populations stay healthy, the odds of "crossover" viruses infecting humans subsides.

    In Australia, deforestation has caused a deadly respiratory virus to pass from fruit bats to humans, by forcing the two species into closer contact, a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 22, 2022
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  • A happy holiday can go sour quickly when food poisoning joins the party.

    Experts from Rutgers New Jersey Poison Control Center offer some tips on safely thawing, preparing and storing food, as well as avoiding issues with alcohol and drugs.

    “Forgetting about food safety is a recipe for disaster,” said Diane...

    Americans are more likely to carry a loaded handgun than ever before: New research finds about twice as many adults carried in 2019 as did in 2015.

    “Between increases in the number of people who own handguns and the number of people who carry every day, there has been a striking increase in handgun carrying in the U.S.,” said lead study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Guns cause more than half of all suicides in the United States each year, and new research finds most of these are handguns owned by the deceased that were stored unlocked and loaded.

    Researchers used data from the National Violent Death Reporting System to examine the deaths of more than 117,000 people who killed themselves with guns between 2003 and 2018.

    "These results highlight ...

    It might be tempting to buy prescription medication online, but buyers should beware, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

    While some pharmacy websites operate legally and can offer convenience, privacy and lower costs, others may be selling unapproved, counterfeit and unsafe medications, the

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 18, 2022
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  • Hurricane Nicole left thousands of Floridians without power Thursday morning, leading the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to warn residents about the dangers of generators and candles.

    The Category 1 hurricane made landfall south of Vero Beach on the East Coast and was quickly downgraded to a tropical storm. It was expected to d...

    Heat waves may be killing prisoners in Texas, according to an analysis that found far-higher-than-normal death rates in the state's non-air-conditioned prisons.

    “The majority of Texas prisons do not have universal air conditioning,” noted lead study author Julie Skarha. “And in these...

    When you set your clocks back on Sunday, do some simple at-home safety checks that could save your life.

    Check your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors to be sure they're working. This is also a good time to replace their batteries.

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends replacing batteries once a...

    Years of litigation over the opioid epidemic could end soon, as the national pharmacy chains CVS and Walgreens announced Wednesday that each company has agreed to a nearly $5 billion settlement.

    While neither of the companies admitted wrongdoing, the settlements are part of the fight over the drug industry's role in the epidemic that has led to 500,000 U.S. deaths in the past 20 years, t...

    While monkeypox cases are declining in the United States, a new government report shows that patients with weakened immune systems, especially those living with HIV, have been hit particularly hard by the virus.

    Even after taking antiviral medication for monkeypox, those with untreated HIV were more ...

    About 88 nursing homes in the United States are on a watch list for worrisome care that puts residents in danger, but now they will face tougher penalties for any future violation.

    Those tougher penalties could include the loss of federal funding if they receive more than one ...

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health is investigating COVID experiments at Boston University that have sparked a media firestorm, with some news outlets alleging that scientists created a "killer" strain of the coronavirus as part of their research.

    Boston University is refuting those news accounts, calling them a "false and inaccurate" interpretation of its research.

    "They've sen...

    Florida residents dealing with the horrific aftermath of Hurricane Ian now need to be concerned about a spike in flesh-eating bacteria cases, health officials warned.

    "The Florida Department of Health in Lee County is observing an abnormal increase in cases of Vibrio vulnificus infections as a result of exposure...

    Aggressive measures are needed in the world's tropical regions to prevent the inevitable next global pandemic, an international coalition of researchers has concluded.

    Epidemics around the world have largely been driven by viruses that spill over from wild animals into humans, mainly in tropical hot ...

    A new study is sounding the alarm about the addition of antihistamines to street forms of opioids — and how they might make a fatal overdose more likely.

    The prime drug in question is diphenhydramine, found commonly in over-the-counter allergy meds such as Benadryl.

    Because

    Do the majority of Americans want government to make sure the products they buy are free of harmful chemicals?

    Yes, a new survey shows, and they are even willing to pay more to get that assurance of safety.

    “At a time when most issues are politically polarized, the issue of keeping people ...

    With the growing popularity of electric scooters, the number of kids injured while riding them has jumped dramatically, a new study finds.

    Moreover, those injuries have become more ...

    While the United States has recently ordered a $290 million supply of a drug meant to treat radiation sickness, federal health officials say that's not cause for alarm.

    It's coincidental that the order of

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • October 10, 2022
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  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken a major step to curb the largest remaining source of airborne lead pollution.

    The agency has proposed a so-called endangerment finding that aircraft that use leaded fuel cause or contribute to

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 7, 2022
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  • Firearm sales in the United States broke records at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Now, researchers have found that firearm injuries to children also increased during the pandemic's first two years compared to the preceding year.

    A new study has found no evidence that COVID-19 shots increase the incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome, according to researchers.

    "This is important because we can say that there is no significant increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome in the population," said study ...

    How can you make your home safer for your young children? You might want to start by removing window coverings with cords that could strangle a toddler.

    "Young children can quickly and silently become strangled on pull cords, conti...

    The global public health community should be on the alert for a family of viruses in African monkeys that have the potential to spill over to humans, researchers warn.

    In their new study, the scientists noted that while it's not certain what impact these viruses might have on humans, there are troubling parallels to

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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