Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Misc.".

Show All Health News Results

Health News Results - 871

Frequent, short exercise sessions may be better for diabetes patients' blood vessels than longer and fewer workouts, and that may reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study.

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease and reduced vascular (blood vessel) function, the study authors noted. Measuring vascular function is often used to determine heart...

Black Americans face a heightened risk of stroke, and a new study suggests that abnormalities in the heart's upper chambers play a role.

Experts said the findings, published Nov. 25 in the journal Neurology, point to an under-recognized factor in Black Americans' stroke risk.

It has long been known that in the United States, Black adults are particularly hard-hit by ischemi...

Lawnae Hunter was ecstatic to escape snowy Oregon and her hectic schedule for a 10-day Christmas vacation with her son, daughter-in-law and then-9-year-old granddaughter in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

The foursome savored lounging by the pool, combing the beach for seashells and sampling the seafood in the remote Caribbean nation.

Over what was supposed to be their final breakfast...

Having a heart attack before your 50th birthday is bad enough. But new research shows if you also live in a poor neighborhood, your chances of dying within a decade of that heart attack are higher.

"This tells us that we need to focus not just on a patient's medical problems, but on the whole person, on where they live and the resources they have that will allow them to thrive," said the ...

Women are less likely than men to receive CPR from a bystander. But why?

The reluctance, new research suggests, may be fueled by worries of being accused of sexual assault or doing physical harm. Knowing people's secret fears is the first step to dispelling them, experts say.

The insights come from a new survey of 520 men and women who were asked to rank potential reasons someone mi...

The Black Lives Matter movement put racism in the United States under the glare of the public spotlight in 2020. And at its recently concluded annual meeting, the American Heart Association pledged to fight racial disparities in heart health and boost the life expectancy of all Americans.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that systemic racism plays a large role in the kind of health an Amer...

Hormone therapy can be a lifesaver for men with prostate cancer, but it also appears to put some at increased risk of heart problems, a new study reports.

Long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increased the risk of heart-related death nearly fourfold in a group of prostate cancer patients, and also caused their heart fitness to decrease, researchers found.

There is one import...

Heart disease and depression are interwoven, and a new study is helping unravel that connection by linking depression with poorer scores on seven important measures of heart health.

The research included more than 4,000 people taking part in a national survey who had been screened for depression using a basic questionnaire. Participants were evaluated for weight, smoking, diet, physical a...

Jessica Grib noticed being a lot more tired with her second pregnancy. She felt winded easily and couldn't catch her breath when lying down. Near her delivery date, she started having issues with high blood pressure. At 36 weeks, her blood pressure remained high enough -- even with medicine -- that doctors ordered her on bed rest.

Her daughter, Amelia, was born a week later. It almost cos...

After hospital discharge, audio messages about self-care can reduce heart failure patients' risk of rehospitalization and death, new research suggests.

Patients may not absorb instructions provided before they leave the hospital, explained study co-author Nancy Albert, a clinical nurse specialist at the Kaufman Center for Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic. So, "we needed a new way to ...

A procedure that freezes bits of heart tissue may be a better option than medication for people with atrial fibrillation (a-fib, or AF), two clinical trials have found.

A-fib is a common heart arrhythmia in which the organ's upper chambers (the atria) beat erratically. Though it is not immediately life-threatening, over time it can lead to complications like heart failure, or blood clots ...

A single pill loaded with cholesterol and blood pressure medications can reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke by as much as 40%, a new international study reports.

The "polypill" containing three generic blood pressure medications and a statin dramatically reduced the risk of heart-related illness in people with no prior history of heart problems, according to clinical trial result...

The rate of resuscitation for cardiac arrests outside of a hospital setting decreased during the first weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The study, which was presented Saturday at the American Heart Association's virtual Resuscitation Science Symposium, set out to explore the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes in the U.S., includin...

To stay healthy, don't just watch what you eat -- watch when you eat it.

New research is driving that point home by looking at the impact of changes in meal timing from day-to-day and from weekday-to-weekend. Those changes were associated with several important heart health risk factors, including changes in waist circumference, body fat, blood pressure and blood sugar, said lead research...

Does high-strength fish oil help the heart or doesn't it?

Prior research into a prescription medicine derived from fish called Vascepa, announced earlier this year, suggested it might be of real value for heart patients.

But the results from a trial of another such drug called Epanova, released Sunday, are disappointing: Researchers found no benefit from taking the medicine for a w...

Minority patients who suffer life-threatening cardiac arrest may get fewer treatments in the hospital -- and face a grimmer outlook -- than white patients, a new, preliminary study suggests.

The findings add to a large body of research finding racial disparities in U.S. health care, including heart disease treatment.

What's different is that the study looked at a "particularly drama...

In the late 1990s, when she was in her 40s, Dona Koster's doctor noticed some irregularities with her heart and referred her to a cardiologist. The specialist's assessment: She had the heart of an 80-year-old.

Koster could hardly believe it. Although she knew about a family history of heart problems, she was fit, often riding her bike or taking long walks. The cardiologist said the proble...

Asian immigrants in the United States are a widely diverse group with heart health risk factors that vary depending on where they are from, new research shows.

It's the first study to divide Asian Americans into subgroups to see how their risk factors for heart disease differ from their U.S.-born white peers. Researchers found immigrants from the Indian subcontinent were more likely to be...

Many transgender people who take hormone therapy have unaddressed risks for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

These patients often have undiagnosed high blood pressure and high cholesterol, even in young adulthood, researchers found.

"Previous research has shown that transgender individuals are less likely to have access to health care or to utilize health care for a vari...

The risk of heart attack is significantly higher in people with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, a new study of U.S. veterans shows.

Past studies have found post-traumatic stress disorder is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Veterans have disproportionately high rates for PTSD as well as traumatic brain injury, the so-called signature injury of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanist...

As the pandemic crashes into the holidays, fewer of us may be getting together with family and friends to celebrate the season. But the bonds of friendship remain key to emotional -- and physical -- health.

"People already recognized that lifestyle factors like exercise and diet and sleep influence our health," said Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Br...

Election Day 2020 saw marijuana legalization continue its march across the United States, but a pair of new studies warn that smoking pot could increase risk for heart patients.

Marijuana smokers are more likely to suffer complications like excess bleeding or stroke if they undergo angioplasty to reopen clogged arteries, a University of Michigan-led study found.

Pot smokers who've h...

White women who experience early menopause are three times more likely to also experience heart trouble at a younger age than their peers who undergo menopause later in life, new research shows.

The study compared heart disease risk in white and Black women who underwent menopause before age 40 with those who started afterward. Menopause most often begins between ages 45 and 55.

Res...

After declining steadily for more than a decade, new research shows the number of people dying from cardiac arrests is climbing. And the greatest increase is among young Black adults.

The study, which is being presented Friday at the American Heart Association's virtual Scientific Sessions, pulled data from 311,065 death certificates for Black and white people in the United States who die...

Fighting fires comes with many risks. But new research shows there's a new one to consider: increased exposure to fires appears to raise the likelihood of developing atrial fibrillation, or AFib, an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other problems.

Researchers found the more fires a firefighter fought, the higher the likelihood he or she would rep...

Physical activity may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among American Indians, according to new research that also studied inflammation's role in exercise and heart health.

Past studies of people from all populations show that inflammation plays a central role in heart disease, and that exercise might reduce inflammation in the body.

For the new study, researcher...

The spice that adds punch to your favorite Kung Pao chicken, Tex-Mex chili or Indian curry may also help save your life.

Preliminary research shows that eating chili pepper may reduce your risk of death from heart disease, cancer and other causes, building on past studies that have found chili pepper to have health benefits.

"I think a lot of people are going to find this informatio...

Asian COVID-19 patients in the United Kingdom have a higher stroke risk than other racial/ethnic groups, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on 1,470 stroke patients admitted to 13 hospitals in England and Scotland between March and July 2020, during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

Among patients who had an ischemic stroke (one caused by blocked blood flow to th...

Cathy Brophy went into the guest room to enjoy her guilty pleasure -- the reality series "Below Deck." She fell asleep, only to eventually wake up, turn off the television and return to sleep.

Around 4:30 a.m., she woke up and tried turning onto her left side. She couldn't.

Cathy's only explanation was that she'd slept awkwardly and something on her right side had gone numb. Her sol...

As temperatures fall, honey's popularity tends to rise. Whether used as an ingredient in autumn recipes and holiday desserts, added to a celebratory cocktail or given to ease a child's cough, it certainly satisfies a sweet tooth.

Although marketers may tout honey as a healthy alternative to regular sugar because of its antioxidant content, experts warn against adding any extra sugar to yo...

The good news is that after a long, heated, divisive campaign, the polls have closed, and the pre-election stress is over.

The bad news is that now it's time for post-election stress, and the accompanying health risks are still here.

"People often get very invested in the results of an election," said Barry Jacobs, a clinical psychologist and author in Philadelphia. "If that result ...

When Pat Spence was growing up in Boston, she and her brother would ride their bikes past a dilapidated home nearly overtaken by vines, weeds and trees in the Mattapan neighborhood. What they called "the creepy house" is now the stately headquarters of the Urban Farming Institute. Spence has been its executive director since 2014.

UFI operates an urban farm, residence, educational center ...

Not every kid needs an electrocardiogram (ECG) before playing sports or as part of routine exams, child health experts say.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is advising parents and pediatricians to avoid unnecessary tests, and has released a list of common medical practices and therapies that may not be needed for young patients.

The AAP and the Choosing Wisely campaign al...

If your blood pressure changes a lot overnight -- either rising or falling -- you may have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study from Japan reports.

When systolic blood pressure (the top number) jumps up by 20 mm/Hg or more during the night, the risk of heart disease and stroke goes up by 18% and the risk of heart failure increases by 25%.

If people consistently...

Jill Veach looked at the name on her chirping phone.

The caller was her longtime babysitter. It was midafternoon, around the time Jill's husband, Matt, would have picked up their children -- Claudia, 8, and Vinnie, 4 -- from the babysitter's home. Matt must have left something there, Jill thought before answering.

"Jill, I'm not trying to scare you, but Claudia is crying with a real...

Strokes can happen any time, anywhere and at any age, which is why it's important to know how to reduce your risk, says the American Stroke Association.

First, check your blood pressure regularly.

"Checking your blood pressure regularly and getting it to a healthy range is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your risk of stroke," Dr. Mitchell Elkind, president of t...

Pregnancy-related heart attacks — especially in the period after childbirth — are on the rise in women who are 30 or older, according to new research.

Although still considered uncommon, a study of nearly 11.3 million records for pregnancy, labor and postpartum cases showed that nearly three-fourths of the 913 women who had heart attacks from 2003 to 2015 were 30 years or ol...

Many married couples or domestic partners share a lot: the same house, bills, pets and maybe children. A new study found they often also share the same behaviors and risk factors that can lead to heart disease.

Researchers assessed heart disease risks and lifestyle behaviors of nearly 5,400 U.S. couples enrolled in an employee wellness program.

They used the risk factors spelled...

Erin Wegener was a tiny baby facing enormous challenges.

Born at 29 weeks' gestation, she weighed only 1 pound, 14 ounces. Her first three months were lived in the neonatal intensive care unit. Family photos show her covered in gauze, sustained by too many tubes to count. Her entire hand just about fit inside her father's wedding ring.

Her parents were warned she could face a li...

When Presley LeGrande was a member of the competitive cheer team NorCal Elite All Stars in San Jose, California, one of their biggest fans was a teammate's sister. She had her own NorCal uniform and would try to copy the athletes' moves, all from a wheelchair on the sidelines.

"When I was 3 years old, I was able to sign up for cheer and there was no question about my abilities," LeGrand...

"Heat-not-burn" tobacco products, created as an alternative to other types of smoking, may harm the user's heart, researchers report.

These tobacco products -- think IQOS from Philip Morris -- are billed as substitutes for e-cigarettes or traditional smokes. But a new review finds they may be tied to heart and blood vessel harms.

Researchers found the inhalants were linked ...

Wendy Wees suffered a miscarriage during her first pregnancy with husband, Jason Protiva, so they were overjoyed when they passed the nine-week mark of her second pregnancy.

At her 20-week appointment, the couple found out they were having a boy. The doctor noticed something else on the sonogram. Their unborn son had a serious heart defect.

Further tests determined he would be b...

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the United States, said on Wednesday he is "cautiously optimistic" that a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready by year's end.

Against the backdrop of a pandemic that has claimed over 220,000 American lives, Fauci noted that the United States' "strategic approach" to vaccine development appears to be bearing fruit. Six U.S. companie...

Could telehealth help paralyzed stroke victims recover their motor skills faster than they would working directly with a physical therapist?

Yes, claims a new study that found patients who had participated in at least 12 weeks of at-home rehabilitation with live video consultations ("telerehabilitation") scored higher in testing of the recovery of their motor skills than those who had...

Centuries before bacon cheeseburgers, cigarettes and couch potatoes, people had clogged arteries that can lead to heart attack and stroke.

How do we know this? Mummies told us.

No, not the groaning, wrapped-in-gauze, walking-with-arms-straight-out mummies that come to life in scary movies we'll be watching this Halloween season.

For more than a decade, experts have been ...

Dontrez Johnson Jr. is a success story in the making. A first-generation college student, he earned a biology degree from Tennessee State University and is on a fellowship helping improve health in Marion, Alabama. His next stop: medical school and becoming a cardiologist.

He's inspired by his experience seeing relatives die after inadequate hospital care – and he's determined to ...

Persimmons are low in calories and high in fiber – a combination that makes them a good choice for weight control. Their mix of antioxidants and nutrients – including vitamins A and C – makes them ideal for a healthy diet.

But for all of the benefits that come in these colorful, somewhat uncommon fruits, it may be their relative obscurity that makes them an even more v...

Parents are usually pleased when their newborn seems big and strong, but new research suggests that large babies may be at higher risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation later in life.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting more than 40 million people worldwide. People with a-fib have a five times increased risk of stroke.

...

Chanel Davis-Mitchell and her husband, Benji Mitchell, were looking forward to parenthood after the birth of their healthy baby boy, Braxton.

Despite a high-risk pregnancy and a massive amount of fluid weight Chanel gained during the final two months, doctors assured her all would be fine after the delivery.

Then, 11 days after Braxton's birth in May 2016, Chanel and Benji were ...

While growing up in the Philippines, Lady Dorothy Elli witnessed childhood hunger and poverty that left her with lasting impressions.

She has made it her mission to address the problem of food insecurity and the negative impact it can have on the academic and personal well-being of students of all ages.

"Health inequity plays a big role in this," said Lady Dorothy, 19, now a...

Show All Health News Results