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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 547

For nearly two years, Ms. D's 8-year-old twins exclaim "Home sweet home!" every time they cross the threshold of their New York City apartment.

Domestic violence drove the family out of their house and into shelter life for nine months. At one point, they commuted two hours each way from Brooklyn to Manhattan so the children would not have to change schools again.

The odds were stac...

Kids aren't scared when surgical staff wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and many feel reassured by use of the gear, researchers say.

Anxiety is common before, during and after surgery, and can result in complications such as pain and delayed recovery. Concerns have been raised that seeing staffers wearing PPE such as hoods, masks and gowns during the coronavirus pandemic might in...

Family and friends can influence whether people follow social distancing recommendations during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds.

British researchers analyzed information from more than 6,600 people in 114 countries. Those who thought their close social circle adhered to distancing guidelines were more likely to do the same, the analysis found.

This influence outweighed w...

Air ambulance service is pricey, but promises lifesaving speed by providing rapid straight-line helicopter transport for critically ill patients.

But a new study out of Denmark questions whether that expensive haste winds up saving more lives.

Researchers found no statistically significant difference in the death rate between people transported by ground ambulance or helicopter, acc...

As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

The COVID-19 pandemic may feel like it's been going on forever, but it's important to keep up safety measures, a mental health expert says.

Dr. Olusinmi Bamgbose, a psychiatrist at Cedars-Sinai in Southern California -- an area that's facing an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases -- offered some tips for keeping up with pandemic safeguards and some theories about why people may be ba...

If the pandemic has shut down your gym, you can still stay or get fit with a simple home exercise plan, researchers say.

The Canadian study was modeled on a fitness plan known as "5BX," or Five Basic Exercises, which was originally developed in the 1950s for the Royal Canadian Air Force. The plan doesn't depend on special equipment and can be adjusted to individual fitness levels.

...

Cases of anaphylactic shock caused by COVID-19 vaccines are very rare, based on numbers from the first week and a half of vaccinations in the United States, federal public health officials said Wednesday.

There have been 21 cases of anaphylaxis out of nearly 1.9 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine administered in the very first days of the national COVID-19 vaccination program, s...

The American Red Cross is urging COVID-19 survivors to donate blood plasma for hospital patients who need it to recover.

As an incentive to help boost the national convalescent plasma shortage, the Red Cross has teamed up with the National Football League and is offering donors a chance to win two tickets to next year's Super Bowl LVI in Los Angeles.

The Red Cross is especially aski...

A return to normal life in America might happen sooner than many expect, one of the nation's leading vaccine experts told HD Live! this week.

As the new coronavirus rages across the country, President-elect Joe Biden has set a goal of one million doses of vaccine delivered every day once he takes office. If that ambitious target is realized, everyday conditions in the United States might ...

It may be no surprise that the COVID-19 pandemic is causing some Americans significant psychological distress. That mental trauma hit people hard, even early in the pandemic, new research shows.

A new RAND Corporation study reports that more than 10% of Americans surveyed said they experienced psychological distress during April and May of 2020 -- the same number as in all of 201...

By Nov. 15 of last year, roughly 47 million Americans -- about 14.5% of the U.S. population -- had already been infected with the new coronavirus, a new study finds.

That's much higher than the close to 11 million known U.S. cases of infection that were recorded by that date, the researchers said, because reported cases "do not represent the full SARS-CoV-2 disease burd...

Despite training that teaches police officers to use neck restraints, there is no medical justification for the tactic, three neurologists write in JAMA Neurology.

The killing of George Floyd, who died in May 2020 after an arresting police officer pressed a knee to his neck for more than eight minutes, helped spark a nationwide conversation about racial injustice.

While Fl...

A New Year's resolution to take better care of yourself is one you should keep, especially in the era of COVID-19.

Wearing a mask, maintaining a safe distance from others and washing your hands frequently are going remain important in 2021. But don't forget to prioritize a healthy lifestyle that improves your overall health and quality of life, and helps prevent cancer, according to exper...

If you're like most American adults, you're not getting enough sleep.

This could be the year to change that, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), which recommends adults get at least seven hours of sleep each night. A survey conducted in July showed that 85% of adults in the United States get less.

"Our survey findings show a worrying trend of national sleep d...

Teenagers who use e-cigarettes may be at increased risk of "mental fog," a new study suggests.

The study, of thousands of U.S. teens, found that those who vaped were three times more likely than their peers to report problems with concentration, memory and decision-making.

The findings mirror those of a recent study of adults by the same research team: Men and women who used e-...

THURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2020 -- A new and more infectious variant of the COVID-19 virus has shown up in separate cases in Colorado and California, weeks after it first emerged in the United Kingdom.

Doctors on the pandemic's front line say people shouldn't panic, but should definitely adhere even more closely to proven infection control measures, like mask wearing and social distancing.

...

As 2020 comes to a close, many people plan to ring in the new year with a bit of bubbly.

But that can lead to calamity when not done safely, warns the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), which offers tips for keeping a Champagne toast from going wrong.

A warm bottle of Champagne paired with poor technique for opening it can send a cork flying up to 50 miles per hour, threatenin...

Children can still read the emotional expressions of people wearing masks during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

"We now have this situation where adults and kids have to interact all the time with people whose faces are partly covered, and a lot of adults are wondering if that's going to be a problem for children's emotional development," said study co-author Ashley Ruba, a postd...

Those mussels, oysters and scallops on your plate may come with a secret ingredient: microplastics.

Researchers at Hull York Medical School and the University of Hull in the United Kingdom reviewed more than 50 studies (from 2014 to 2020) to investigate the levels of microplastic contamination globally in fish and shellfish.

The investigators found that mollusks (such as clams, muss...


Keep your distance. Although wearing a mask can limit transmission of droplets that spread COVID-19, it may not be enough unless people also stay at least six feet apart, new research shows.

Researchers at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces found that at distances of less than six feet, enough droplets to potentially cause illness still made it through several masks made of co...

Hospitals are swamped with older patients after hurricanes, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on hospitalizations for adults 65 and older in the month following eight of the United States' largest hurricanes in recent years.

In this age group, post-hurricane increases in hospitalizations for any reason ranged from 10% (Hurricane Irene, 2011) to 23% (Hurricane Sandy, 2012)...

In very rare cases, some people have had severe allergic reactions after receiving the new COVID-19 vaccines, leading the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI) to issue updated guidance for Americans with allergies.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given emergency use authorization to COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

The ACAAI's COVI...

Despite more Americans saying they know someone who's been sickened or even died from COVID-19, there's been a decline in the percentage who say they always wear a mask when they leave their home.

Two-thirds (66%) of U.S. adults surveyed in a new HealthDay/Harris Poll said they "always" donned a mask when leaving their home and weren't able to socially distance, compared with 72%...

There's a lot of misinformation about vaccines as the United States begins its massive COVID-19 vaccination program, so an expert wants to dispel the many myths about vaccines in general.

Vaccines are among the most heavily studied of all drugs, and the evidence shows they are safe and extremely effective, according to Dr. Patrick Gavigan, a pediatric infectious disease physician at Penn ...

Though many Americans would support a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, a Gallup survey finds there is no clear majority in favor of it.

The Gallup Panel conducted the online survey of 2,730 U.S. adults between Sept. 14 and 27.

Nearly 49% of respondents said they would "accept" a state mandate requiring children to be vaccinated in order to attend school. But support fell to 41% when respo...

Many Americans are working at home or attending school virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to increased use of home heating and its potential risks, an expert says.

Heating sources can pose electrical hazards and fire dangers, noted Purnima Unni, manager of the pediatric trauma injury prevention program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashv...

You might want to think twice before you enter a hallway with strangers during the pandemic: Researchers report that following a fast-walking person with COVID-19 down a narrow corridor could increase your risk of infection, even if you keep your distance.

That's because that person can leave long streams of virus-laden droplets behind them, according to a study published Dec. 15 in th...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16, 2020 (HealthDay)-- Delayed mail delivery due to a push from the White House and others to slash spending and services could have enormous consequences for Americans who depend on the U.S. Postal Service for access to urgently needed prescription medications, a new study warns.

"We found that among those who rely exclusively on mail-order pharmacies, about half are elde...

Amid hopes stirred by the recent rollout of an approved COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, a new study warns that shots may not be available to nearly one-quarter of the world's people until 2022.

A second study estimates that 3.7 billion adults worldwide are willing to get the vaccine.

Together, these two findings suggest that getting people immunized could be as big a challen...

Firearm injury is a major health crisis in the United States and new research sheds more light on how many of those who are injured survive and the circumstances of their shootings.

For the study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University analyzed nationwide data from death certificates and emergency room visits.

Between 2009 and 2017, the United States...

A self-collected saliva sample is as good at detecting COVID-19 as a nasal swab administered by a health care worker -- without exposing medical staff to the virus while collecting the sample.

"The current pandemic has placed a significant strain on the supply chain, from swabs to the personal protective equipment [PPE] health care workers need to safely collect samples," explained lead i...

Two new COVID-19 vaccines, developed at record-setting speed, are soon to be assessed by U.S. agencies for emergency use in combating the ongoing pandemic.

Advisory panels of infectious disease experts this week will assess a vaccine developed by pharmaceutical company Pfizer and German biotech firm BioNTech -- a vaccine that Britain began administering to its most vulnerable citizens on ...

Young women who regularly visit tanning salons may have an increased risk of developing endometriosis, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the findings, from a large study of U.S. women, don't prove that tanning beds help cause the painful pelvic condition.

But, they noted, the study might give women more incentive to avoid indoor tanning.

Endometriosis is a condition in wh...

Two COVID-19 vaccines are on the verge of approval in the United States, with pharmaceutical companies promising that millions of doses will be available to the first wave of recipients within a matter of weeks.

Creating two vaccines in less than a year is an astonishing achievement, experts say, but the next task could prove even more difficult — convincing Americans that it's safe to ...

COVID-19 patients with abnormally high blood sugar are at increased risk for serious illness and death, even if they don't have diabetes, new research shows.

The study included more than 11,300 non-critically ill adults with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in Spain between March and the end of May 2020. Of those, 19% were previously diagnosed with diabetes.

In all, one in five patien...

Vaping among teens and young adults has decreased dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, with two-thirds of e-cigarette users reporting that they've either cut back or quit, a new study says.

About 32% of e-cigarette users said they quit this year and another 35% reported cutting back, according to survey results published Dec. 3 in JAMA Network Online.

Concerns about l...

States with strong football cultures have often fumbled measures to protect young players who've suffered concussions, researchers say.

They analyzed youth concussion laws introduced by states between 2007 and 2014, specifically guidelines requiring a 24-hour delay before sending a player with a possible concussion back onto the field.

The researchers found that states with college ...

Nearly 15% of talc-based cosmetic products analyzed in a recent study contained asbestos.

Environmental Working Group (EWG) -- an American advocacy nonprofit that commissioned the tests and did the analysis -- said methods used by the cosmetics industry to screen talc supplies are inadequate. The voluntary testing method developed by industry is not sensitive enough to screen for asbestos...

People who cook with wood instead of other fuels may be at risk of lung damage because of the pollutants and bacterial toxins they're breathing, a small study suggests.

Researchers studied the impact of cookstove pollutants on 23 people in Thanjavur, India, who use liquefied petroleum gas or wood biomass (wood, crop waste or wood brush) to cook.

They measured concentrations of pollu...

As college students prepare to leave their campuses for Thanksgiving or study remotely for the rest of the semester, families should consider their risks and work to reduce them, according to an infectious disease expert.

Dr. David Cennimo, an assistant professor in pediatric infectious disease at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, offered suggestions on how families could appro...

President-elect Joe Biden campaigned on big plans for health care, many of which would face an uphill road if the U.S. Senate remains in Republican hands.

But one of the first contributions Biden will make to America's health also will be one of the most important, experts said -- de-politicizing and unifying the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"I think you have in this pers...

Restaurants are under increasing pressure to provide a safe dining environment as winter approaches and the United States enters what could be the worst wave yet of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some eateries are attempting to extend outdoor dining into the colder winter months, setting up heated tents that might allow patrons to enjoy a meal without fear of contracting the coronavirus. Others a...

Medication drop boxes at pharmacies are a safe and secure way for people to dispose of unwanted drugs, but many people are unaware of them, a new study finds.

Medications placed in the drop boxes are collected and typically incinerated or disposed of as hazardous waste.

That avoids them being flushed down the toilet or thrown in the trash, where they pollute groundwater, rivers and ...

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

The first rapid coronavirus test that can be taken at home with results delivered in 30 minutes was cleared for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday.

The simple nasal swab test, developed by Lucira Health, requires a prescription and people under the age of 14 can't perform the test on themselves, the FDA said in a statement.

The California company said...

A Chinese COVID-19 vaccine seems to be safe and effective, early trial results suggest, but one expert says the findings should be regarded with caution.

The CoronaVac vaccine is based on inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus. It was tested in a phase 1/2 clinical trial that included more than 700 healthy volunteers, ages 18-59, who were recruited in China between April 16 and May 5.

The vac...

As COVID-19 case numbers surge across the United States, some people are experiencing pandemic fatigue after many months of social distancing, mask wearing and quarantines.

Experts from Penn State Health stressed the importance of continued vigilance and following established safety efforts to slow the spread of the virus, while also offering suggestions for minding mental health while b...

Face masks are a key tool in the fight against the coronavirus, but many people wonder if it's safe to wear a mask for a prolonged period. Some also question whether a mask can restrict oxygen intake or cause a buildup of carbon dioxide.

"As a pulmonologist, I can assure you that for most people wearing a mask is safe," said Dr. Daniel Dilling, a critical care medicine specialist at Loyol...

A deadly South American virus that causes Ebola-like bleeding can spread human-to-human, public health officials have learned from its second-ever outbreak.

Public health investigators have reconstructed the path by which the Chapare virus spread from person to person during a 2019 outbreak in Bolivia, leaping from the initial patient to several health care workers.

But while the ro...

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