Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Behavior".

Health News Results - 525

If you or someone you know has suffered a concussion, a medical evaluation is crucial, an expert says.

A concussion is "a short-lived functional brain injury typically caused by a bump or blow to the head," Cleveland Clinic con...

THURSDAY, Jan. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- If the sound of a dental drill sends shivers up your spine, you're likely in good company: Finnish researchers say that one of every two adults fear the dentist at least a little, while one in 10 are very afraid.

But the researchers added that a local dentistry program has found a novel way to turn screams into smiles, by expo...

THURSDAY, Jan. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

"Prolonged TV viewing, which involves i...

TUESDAY, Jan. 18, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- People who believe their bodies and minds will break down with age may be creating a self-fulfilling prophecy, a recent study suggests.

Researchers found that older adults with a dim outlook on aging tended to report more physical health symptoms on days when they were stressed out than on less stressful days.

In contrast...

People's political views do affect their opinions about COVID-19 policies, a new study confirms, but researchers also found that advice from trusted experts can override those political biases.

"These findings underscore how important it is to have communications come from scientific sources that are not seen as political and to keep prominent politicians out of the spotlight of crisis co...

You've gotten vaccinated. You've gotten boosted. You wear your mask, maintain social distancing, wash your hands — you do everything you've been asked to do to protect yourself and others.

And you are completely fed up.

If that description sounds like you, you might be part of a contingent of people who consider themselves "vaxxed and done" with the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • January 17, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Parents, brace yourselves.

    As the Omicron variant surges and U.S. schools deal with a substitute teacher shortage and related pandemic fallout, don't be surprised if a return to remote or hybrid learning leads your kids to act out, a new study warns.

    Previous shifts from in-person to re...

    Beating cancer is a huge feat, but how survivors live their lives afterwards also influences their longevity. A new study shows those who sit too much and are not physically active are much more likely to die early from cancer or any other cause than those who are more active.

    Data on c...

    Men who are broken-hearted or just unlucky in love could be more likely to have health-damaging inflammation, new research suggests.

    Serious breakups and solo living for many years may increase the risk of ill health and death — but apparently only for men, according to the researchers behind a new Danish study.

    "Small numbers of breakups or years lived alone is not in itself a r...

    Ask a teacher whether school uniforms make a difference in their classrooms, and many are sure of it.

    They insist those crisp shirts and ties and those modest plaid skirts help kids focus on their classwork, level the playing field and boost attendance, among other perks.

    But a new study says it's just not so.

    Turns ou...

    Lockdowns keep people home for a few weeks, but they lose their luster after a few months, claims a new study that comes as many countries consider a return to lockdowns to slow the renewed spread of COVID-19.

    The findings could be used by policymakers when deciding whether to impose lockdowns, the research...

    Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    It's clear that COVID-19 has killed many hundreds of thousands of people in the United States. Less clear is its impact on other health issues, which will be felt in the years to come.

    Liver disease is projected to be one of those, with 8,000 additional deaths from

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    TUESDAY, Dec. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Intermittent fasting is all the rage due to its potential health benefits, and now a new review shows this style of eating really does produce weight loss and may even improve certain markers of heart health.

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • December 21, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Like Mr. Grinch, heartburn can crush your holiday, but there are easy ways to prevent it.

    "Heartburn is caused by acidic stomach content moving into the esophagus, or gullet, which is much less resistant to acid," said Dr. James East, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London. "This results in irritation and damage to the lining of the esophagus, literally a burn, that caus...

    There may be a silver lining to the COVID-19 pandemic, with U.S. health officials reporting an "unprecedented" decline in teens' use of alcohol, marijuana, other illegal drugs and vaping.

    "We have never seen such dramatic decreases in drug use among teens in just a one-year period," said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

    "These data are unpreced...

    When someone says "I need a drink," it's usually because they've had a rough day. Now, new research suggests that stress is more likely to trigger heavy drinking in women than in men.

    "Some people can intend to have one or two alcoholic beverages and stop drinking, but other people just keep going," said study leader Julie Patock-Peckham. She's head of the Social Addictions Impulse Lab at...

    Poor neighborhoods of color bore the brunt of a surge in violent crime in U.S. cities early in the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

    "This study adds to the mounting body of research showing that equal opportunities — including the opportunity to live, work, learn, play and worship free fro...

    A new study confirms yet another consequence of the pandemic for children and teenagers: Eating disorders, and hospitalizations for them, rose sharply in 2020.

    The study of six hospitals across Canada found new diagnoses of anorexia nearly doubled during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. And the rate of hospitalization among those patients was almost threefold higher, versus pre-pa...

    The sound of mom's voice can soothe a fussy baby like nothing else, but now new research suggests that an infant is also calmed by the scent of its mother.

    Prior animal studies had already shown that olfaction -- smell -- "is very important, that mother's smell is very critical for attachment," noted study author Ruth Feldman. "Young recognize mother by her smell, and mother and habitat a...

    This time of year can be hard on the heart.

    The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

    "The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

  • |
  • December 12, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Nearly half of 12- to 17-year-olds in the United States have had at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot, but the initial rush to get teens immunized has stalled, a new survey of parents shows.

    Only 1% of parents now plan to get their teen vaccinated as soon as possible; 13% said they'll wait and see how vaccination works for others; and 30% said they won't get their teen vaccinated.

    The...

    Public health experts have long recommended getting a seasonal flu shot, but a new study suggests there's hesitancy about that vaccine, too. Physicians and pharmacists can play a key role in flu shot uptake, the research shows.

    Only about 44% of people who had a health care provider got their flu shots, the study found, but it was even worse among those who didn't have a doctor: Only one...

    If you think you're fine to drive after drinking, there's a good chance you're wrong, new research shows.

    The study found that despite being over the legal driving limit, half of the participants believed they were safe to drive.

    The study included 90 volunteers, average age 24, in Germany who drank either wine or beer until they reached a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC)...

    You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

    "It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

    Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

    Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

    College students are not bouncing back from the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, a troubling new study finds.

    Researchers were surprised to find that one year after the start of the pandemic, college students were still less active and more at risk for depression even as social restrictions were lifted and many were vaccinated.

    While the new study focused on the experien...

    Quitting smoking is especially important during pregnancy, and now a new study suggests that when it comes to kicking the habit, cash may be just the incentive some women need.

    The study results suggest progressive financial rewards for smoking abstinence "could be implemented in the routine health care of pregnant smokers," the French researchers said. Dr. Ivan Berlin of Hôpital Pitié-...

    Parents who want to read to their toddlers and give them a developmental boost ought to pick up a traditional paper book rather than an e-book on a tablet, a new study reports.

    Toddlers are more likely to interact with their parents when they're sharing a paper children's book rather than a tablet, University of Michigan researchers found.

    Parents also tended to talk more to their c...

    Worried about climate change? You can do something about it every time you lift your fork, a new study suggests.

    Folks can reduce their personal carbon footprint by eating less red meat, nibbling fewer sweets and cutting back on tea, coffee and booze, according to the findings.

    "We all want to do our bit to help save the planet," said senior researcher Darren Greenwood, a senior lec...

    The misconception that girls are less interested than boys in computer science and engineering begins at a young age in the United States.

    And it's one reason for the gender gap in those career fields, according to a new study.

    In surveys of more than 2,200 U.S. children and teens in grades 1 through 12, researchers found that half 51% believed girls are le...

    A return to a more normal holiday season may also mean higher stress levels, so an expert offers some coping tips.

    Don't get too focused on buying the perfect presents, making the best dinner or planning the perfect party. Try to be mindful of pleasant things and moments, suggested Jennifer Wegmann, a health and wellness studies lecturer at Binghamton University, State University of New Y...

    One in five adults avoided seeking health care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when they had symptoms suggesting the need for urgent medical attention, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

    "Health care avoidance during COVID-19 may be prevalent amongst those who are in greater need of it in the population, such as older individuals," a team led by Silvan Licher, of Erasmus Univ...

    Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

    Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

    Their new study found that in older adults, cleaning house was tied to a better memory and attention span, a...

    Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

    Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

    "It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

    Don't drive drunk. That's simple and obvious advice. And it appears ridesharing services are making it easier for people to take it.

    In a new study that looked at Chicago data, more rideshare trips meant fewer alcohol-involved crashes.

    "This study was designed to look specifically at drunk driver crashing," said study author Christopher Morrison.

    "When there are more rideshare...

    As American families sit down to celebrate Thanksgiving, a majority of parents say they want to raise grateful kids but they don't think they're succeeding.

    Four out of five respondents to a new nationwide poll said children aren't as thankful as they should be, and half worry that they overindulge their own kids. Two in five also said they're sometimes embarrassed by how selfish their ch...

    A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

    The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life being upended during the pandemic, have seen changes on the bath...

    American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

    "It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor of counseling and human development services ...

    A new study confirms that when a country is more accepting of people who are LGBTQ, fewer gay or bisexual men take their own lives.

    In a new study, researchers compared life in a country where LGBTQ folks encounter strong stigma with that in a country where stigma against them is low. The upshot: The risk of depression and suicide dropped significantly when gay men moved to a more toleran...

    As many parents know, children can be notoriously picky eaters. In some cases, their chronically fearful approach towards food amounts to what is considered a serious psychiatric condition.

    But a new survey of adults who were, and continue to be, finicky eaters suggests that rather than forcing a child to eat foods they don't like, parents will probably make more headway by embracing a no...

    Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

    "During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagues to get referrals than it was for me, and the patients they were referred were more likely to need surgery," said seni...

    Is there an ideal time to go to bed every night if you want to dodge heart disease?

    Apparently there is, claims a new study that found hitting the sack between 10 and 11 p.m. may be the ideal time to cut the risk for cardiovascular trouble.

    The finding may be worth heeding, since the researchers also found that going to sleep before 10 p.m. or at midnight or later might raise the ri...

    Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

    The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

    Most folks groan when the time comes to either "spring forward" or "fall back" an hour, with the waxing and waning of daylight saving time.

    But that one-hour time shift — which occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday — is more than just a minor annoyance, sleep experts say.

    Research has shown that deliberately messing with our internal clock twice a year increases our risk of accident, illness ...

    Why is it so easy for bilingual folks to switch back and forth from one language to another?

    Researchers have discovered that the brain uses a shared mechanism that makes using multiple languages completely natural.

    "Languages may differ in what sounds they use and how they organize words to form sentences," said lead study author Sarah Phillips, a doctoral student in the Neurolingu...

    As teens dramatically stepped up their screen time during COVID-19 lockdowns, their well-being took a hit, a new study reveals.

    Recreational screen time among U.S. teens doubled from before the pandemic to nearly eight hours per day during the pandemic, according to the report. And this estimate doesn't include time spent on screens for remote learning or schoolwork, so the total was like...

    Very few people are chronic liars, according to a study that may draw eyerolls from Americans swamped by "fake news" and misinformation.

    Prior research has found that people tell an average of one or two lies a day. But these new findings suggest that doesn't reflect the behavior of most people, and that most fibs are told by only a few prolific liars, the study authors said.

    "There...

    Living near a fast-food restaurant may provide a quick fix if you're famished and pressed for time, but it may boost your odds for type 2 diabetes, a large study of U.S veterans suggests.

    Neighborhoods with more supermarkets, however, may protect you against developing diabetes, especially in suburban and rural areas, the researchers said.

    "The food availability choices in your envi...

    Show All Health News Results