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Results for search "Poisons".

07 Feb

Calling a Food 'Light' in Calories May Backfire

A new study finds people eat more when a meal is labeled ‘light’ as opposed to ‘filling’.

Health News Results - 86

An unprecedented water crisis continues to take a heavy toll on the mental health of adults in Flint, Michigan, a large survey shows.

Five years after the crisis, an estimated one in five — about 13,600 people — remained clinically depressed, the survey found. And about one in four — 1...

Pregnant women are exposed to toxic chemicals in dishware, hair coloring, plastics and pesticides that can heighten their risk of cancer and harm child development, a new study warns.

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 30, 2022
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  • It's well known that exposure to lead can harm young children's brain development. Now a new study suggests that racial segregation may be compounding the detrimental effects of lead on Black children.

    The study, of close to 26,000 schoolchildren, found that Black children with elevated blood lead levels had wo...

    It's a startling statistic: A new study finds the number of kids accidentally poisoned by the over-the-counter sleep aid melatonin has soared by 530% over the past decade.

    For most children, the overdose only causes excessive sleepiness, but for some it can result in hospitalization and even ...

    Nations are falling short in their efforts to get rid of toxic PCB chemicals that pose a risk to human health and the environment, researchers report.

    "We're only six years out from the Stockholm Convention's deadline to responsibly eliminate PCB stocks, but shockingly little progress has been made," said study co-author Lisa Melymuk, an assistant professor of environmental chemistry at M...

    Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study warns.

    "This is the first time we've been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women - not just identify chemicals," ...

    Maybe you ask the barista for cream with your coffee, and possibly sugar as well.

    But new research shows that paper cup of joe you grab off the coffeehouse counter contains another ingredient, and it's one you might not care for - trillions of tiny plastic particles that leach into your hot java from...

    With marijuana now legal in many U.S. states, some veterinarians are seeing more cases of cannabis poisoning in dogs and other pets, according to a new survey.

    The poll, of 251 vets in Canada and the United States, found that those incidents usually end well: Most animals recover quickly, without needing a hospital stay.

    But in some cases, more intense treatment is needed. And a sma...

    Marijuana edibles that mimic the packaging of popular snack foods pose a risk to children, a new study warns.

    Researchers looked at the packaging of more than 200 types of edible marijuana products and found that nearly one in 10 resembled commercial snacks foods, including candies and chips....

    New studies add to the extensive body of research showing the many risks that lead poses to youngsters.

    The association between lead exposure and children's IQ is well-documented, but these Univers...

    A proposed rule to ban ongoing uses of the only known form of asbestos imported into the United States has been introduced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    The ban would apply to chrysotile asbestos, which is known to cause cancer and is found in products like asbestos diaphragms, sheet gaske...

    Your pet's poop and pee may give you clues to how many cancer-causing toxins have taken up residence in your home.

    "Our findings suggest that pets are coming into contact with aromatic amines that leach from products in their household environment," said study author Sridhar Chinthakindi, a postdoctoral fellow at NYU Langone Health in New York City.

    "As these substances have been t...

    At-home COVID-19 tests are a key tool in containing the spread of the coronavirus. But a few safety precautions are in order to prevent serious injury, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

    The tests can cause harm if they're not used according to manufacturers' instructions, and they also need to be kept out of reach from children and pets, the FDA said.

    It said it has recei...

    If you were born before 1996, there's a good chance you were exposed to high levels of lead as a kid, and new research suggests this may have harmed your IQ and boosted your chances of lead-related health concerns down the road.

    "A significant proportion of Americans alive today had very high lead exposure as children...

    Dozens of different spray products -- deodorants, shampoos, sunscreens, athlete's foot treatments -- have been recalled in recent months due to contamination with the cancer-causing chemical benzene.

    Most recently, six Brut and Sure aerosol antiperspirants

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued another pointed warning about the dangers posed by tianeptine, an antidepressant that is not approved for any type of medical treatment in the United States.

    Topping the list of possible risks from ta...

    Construction workers may bring home more than the bacon -- they may also be exposing their families to toxic metals, a new study reveals.

    Toxic contaminants unintentionally brought from the workplace into the home are a public health hazard, but the majority of research to date has focused on

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  • February 22, 2022
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  • Six Brut and Sure aerosol antiperspirant and deodorant sprays sold in the United States and Canada have been recalled by their maker due to the presence of the chemical benzene.

    "Benzene is classif...

    Fracking has already raised the ire of environmentalists for its effects on the planet, but new research sends up another red flag: The wastewater produced by the complicated oil and gas drilling process is loaded with toxic and cancer-causing contaminants that threaten both people and wildlife.

    In fracking, water tha...

    The national bird of the United States is facing a deadly threat from within: widespread lead poisoning, largely caused by ingesting fragments of hunters' lead ammunition.

    The poisoning is slowing the population growth of both bald eagles, the nation's symbol since 1782, and golden eagles, whose numbers ...

    With winter storms roaring through much of the United States this week, millions of Americans may face power outages that could put them at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires as they try to keep warm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    When the power goes out, many people use portable generators or other devices for heat and power, but improper use of such equipme...

    Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

    Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately before.

    The pattern is not surprising, said lead researc...

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

    The deadly tornadoes that devastated communities in multiple states this past weekend have destroyed many homes and left others without power.

    But if people turn to generators to manage in the aftermath, they should use caution, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Portable generators can expose users to increased risk of

  • Cara Murez
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  • December 15, 2021
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  • Setting your clocks back an hour this Sunday also means it's time to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    Working alarms are especially important because people are spending more time at home due to the pandemic, which means furnaces, fireplaces and other fuel-burning appliances are being used mo...

    Accidental poisonings on Halloween can turn a night of fun into one that's truly scary.

    The following poison prevention tips -- from the Nebraska Regional Poison Center -- can help your little ones stay safe:

    The liquid in lighted glow sticks can sting or burn if it gets into the eyes or mouth. Know that glow sticks are soft and can easily break open if children put them in their mo...

    It's often called luster dust, and it can add some sparkle to your cake decorations. But health officials warn it also might contain poisonous heavy metals that are not meant to be eaten.

    Luster dust is used to add glitter or color to desserts. However, Rhode Island and Missouri saw cases of heavy metal poisonings linked with commercial and homemade cakes decorated with luster dust in 201...

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday that it has lowered its limits for lead poisoning in kids.

    The move is expected to more than double the number of 1- to 5-year-olds with worrisome levels of the toxic metal in their blood, according to the Associated Press. That means the number is projected to grow from 200,000 to about 500,000, AP said.

    <...

    It's a drug that's been supported by some conservative media figures, but taking ivermectin to treat or prevent COVID-19 might land you in the hospital, a new study warns.

    Interest in the drug surged last summer as the highly contagious Delta variant took over the United States. But instead of protecting against the virus, the use of a medicine typically reserved for horses and cattle has...

    Despite the troubling findings of a congressional report released earlier this year on toxins in baby foods, a new report finds even more manufacturers are selling baby foods that contain potentially unsafe levels of heavy metals.

    The toxins in question include dangerous levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury, among others.

    "No level of toxic heavy metals and exposure to them ...

    More than 50% of American children have detectable blood lead levels, a new study reveals. And young children who live in places with lots of pre-1950s housing and low incomes have the greatest risk.

    "Public health authorities have worked commendably to reduce lead exposure for decades, and yet, substantial risk remains," said study co-author Dr. Harvey Kaufman, head of health trends rese...

    As the COVID-19 pandemic grinds on and stress on families mounts, more kids are falling victim to accidental poisoning.

    Experts attribute the surge to disrupted sleep patterns, work schedules and parenting routines.

    "I think what's happening is, parents are challenged with a couple of things," said Helen Arbogast, manager of the Injury Prevention Program at Children's Hospital Los A...

    Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

    Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

    The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 37 European nations since 1960. Lead levels were stacked up against responses to a personality survey of roughly 1.5 million men and women.

    The result: Americans raised in areas...

    The good news: Levels of lead in the air that Londoners breathe are far lower today than they were in the 1980s, when leaded gas was an automotive staple.

    The bad news: Decades-old lead particles still pollute the city's air, a stubborn and potentially hazardous leftover of a now banned product. The findings might have implications for the health of city dwellers globally.

    In the ...

    A leading medical group is offering testing guidelines for children with autistic behaviors.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Environmental Health emphasized that certain measurements to test for exposure to chemicals are not helpful to guide treatment. The council pointed out that just because a chemical is found in the body doesn't mean it will cause harm.

    The counc...

    The coronavirus pandemic has had an unexpected side effect -- a wave of bad reactions to alcohol-based hand sanitizers.

    Vapors from the products can cause headache, nausea and dizziness, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which advises consumers to use the products in well-ventilated areas.

    "We have received increasing reports of these side effects since the start ...

    Newfangled marijuana products -- edibles, concentrates, vapes -- are driving an overall increase in pot-related calls to U.S. poison control centers, a new study shows.

    There were more than 11,100 calls related to marijuana use in 2019, up from about 8,200 in 2017, researchers said.

    More and more of those calls are related to manufactured products that contain distilled amounts of T...

    A rash of gasoline-related poisoning calls has led U.S. poison experts to warn against gas siphoning.

    Gasoline hoarding and siphoning in some East Coast states has led to a significant increase in gasoline-related emergencies, the Association of Poison Control Centers said.

    Recent concerns about limited gasoline supplies due to the shutdown of a major pipeline led some people to try...

    If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

    Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

    Hurricane season in North America runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has ...

    A deadly chemical in paint strippers continues to kill workers despite its known dangers, a new study finds.

    The chemical methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane (DCM), is a solvent found in paint strippers, cleaners, degreasers, adhesives and sealants. When inhaled, it produces large quantities of carbon monoxide that can cut off oxygen to the heart. At high doses, it switches ...

    Makers of inhalers that contain the nasal decongestant propylhexedrine should make design changes to prevent misuse, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

    Propylhexedrine is a nasal decongestant in over-the-counter inhalers, and right now is "only marketed under the brand name Benzedrex," the FDA said. The agency said that propylhexedrine is effective and safe when used for short pe...

    Calls to U.S. poison centers about incidents involving children and high-powered magnets surged more than 400% after a court overturned a ban on the magnets, a new study finds.

    "Regulations on these products were effective, and the dramatic increase in the number of high-powered magnet related injuries since the ban was lifted - even compared to pre-ban numbers - is alarming," said Dr. Le...

    Winter weather can bring hidden dangers, the most deadly of which can include carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

    As blizzards, tornadoes and severe storms batter the nation and many lose power and heat, the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires from portable generators and other devices increase exponentially, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Carb...

    Fireworks, skateboards and button batteries are among the products associated with increased trips to the emergency room during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

    While ER treatment of product-related injuries fell by about a quarter between March and September of last year, a new report pointed to surges for...

    Carbon monoxide poisoning can prove fatal without a warning, because it can't be seen, smelled or heard.

    It's important to be aware of it, especially during winter when you're indoors and using heat sources to stay cozy.

    The Nebraska Regional Poison Center has some tips for preventing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and recognizing symptoms of exposure to CO.

    CO is a gas produc...

    The explosive rise in use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers during the COVID-19 pandemic has had a dangerous, unintended consequence: eye injuries among children.

    Using data from French poison control and a children's hospital in Paris, researchers reported that accidental eye injuries to kids under age 18 shot up sevenfold during a five-month period last year, compared to 2019.

    Many Americans are working at home or attending school virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to increased use of home heating and its potential risks, an expert says.

    Heating sources can pose electrical hazards and fire dangers, noted Purnima Unni, manager of the pediatric trauma injury prevention program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashv...

    Old age and chronic health conditions aren't the only risk factors for serious COVID-19 infection. Researchers say people with high levels of the heavy metal cadmium may also have higher odds of severe disease during the pandemic.

    Cadmium is found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables. Previous research has shown that long-term exposure to cadmium, even at low levels, may weak...

    Middle-aged adults who had elevated levels of lead in their blood as children have brain structure changes, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed childhood lead exposure data on 564 participants in a long-term study of people who were born in the same town in New Zealand in 1972 and 1973.

    The participants grew up during the peak era of leaded gasoline (late 196...

    The sting of fire ants can be painful and even deadly -- and the threat rises during fall across the southeastern United States.

    At this time of year, fire ants move to warm surfaces such as concrete slabs or asphalt roads, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), which urges people to take precautions.

    A child can be stung walking through...

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