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Results for search "Child Development".

18 Nov

Long Hours in Day Care Won’t Cause Behavioral Problems, Study Finds

Researchers find little evidence that spending extensive time in day care causes behavioral issues from biting to bullying.

Health News Results - 475

The heart health of children conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF) is similar to that of their naturally conceived peers, researchers have found.

The large study found no robust difference in blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol and glucose mea...

American schoolchildren could be getting school lunches that have less sugar and salt in the future, thanks to new nutrition standards announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday.

These are the first school lunch program updates since 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

What’s dif...

Autism services are harder to find in many of the places where Black, Hispanic and Native American families live, new research shows.

It's known that there are racial disparities in U.S. families' receipt of autism services — ranging from diagnosis and behavioral therapy to school and community programs.

The

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 30, 2023
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  • Just like adults, children need lots of fiber in their diets.

    Fiber is part of what fuels a child’s normal growth and development. It helps them feel full longer, controls blood sugar levels, reduces cholesterol and promotes regular bowel movements, according to Children's Health of Orange County, Calif. ...

    A mother-to-be's exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may have a lasting impact on her baby's brain development, new research indicates.

    Toddlers scored lower on assessments for thinking, motor and language skills when their mothers had more exposure to pollutants during pregnancy, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.

    “Our findings sug...

    By the time they're teenagers, babies born prematurely may be getting poorer school grades than their non-preemie peers.

    Researchers found that babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy had lower scores on math and language tests during their teen years compared to kids born at 40 weeks.

    However, the study did not find a significant difference in later brain function in babies born b...

    While childhood obesity gets a lot of attention, some kids struggle with the opposite issue — they have trouble gaining weight.

    So, how can parents know if their child is “too skinny?”

    While the best resource is likely a child’s pediatrician, experts have also weighed in on the topic.

    “Underlying health conditions can result in children and adolescents being underwei...

    A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.

    Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were ...

    When teenagers feel good about themselves and their lives, it may also do their hearts good in the long run, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that teenagers who generally felt happy, optimistic and loved went on to show better cardiovascular health in their 20s and 30s, versus kids who lacked that level of mental well-being.

    Overall, they were more likely to maintain a healt...

    Social media's impact on young people is a hot topic, with most kids and teens wanting to do whatever their friends are doing and parents worrying about setting limits.

    A new study examines whether frequent checking of social media sites (Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat) is associated with changes in functional brain development in these early adolescents, about age 12.

    Using brain...

    When children have autism, it's possible to recognize the symptoms as early as when they are 18 months old.

    Although it takes a doctor to diagnose the condition, parents and caregivers should be aware of the signs, advises the Autism Research Institute, offering some other tips for noticing early symptoms.

    Children with autism may have variety of social, communication and behaviora...

    Those seemingly random kicks or wiggles a newborn baby makes have a purpose.

    With each movement, the baby is developing its sensorimotor system, which it will later use to perform sequential movements. The sensorimotor system lets a person control muscles, movement and coordination.

    Researchers studying these “spontaneous” newborn movements and comparing them to babies a few mon...

    Preteens who spend much of their free time watching online videos or playing video games may have a heightened risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among 9,200 9- and 10-year-olds they assessed, the odds of developing OCD inched up ...

    It's easy to blame the childhood obesity epidemic for growing cases of type 2 diabetes, but a new study finds nearly one-quarter of all diagnoses are not related to obesity.

    “The finding was somewhat surprising,” said Dr. Constantine Samaan, an associate professor in the department of pediatri...

    It's an all-too-familiar scenario for many parents: Your preschooler starts to act up just as the phone rings or you start dinner.

    Maybe you hand over an iPad or smartphone to soothe the child so you can get down to business.

    And this probably does the trick. But if this is your go-to strategy, your child may be at risk for developing longer-term behavioral issues — especially boy...

    Children with type 1 diabetes miss more school than their peers without this condition, but the good news is these absences don't have to affect their grades or chances of going on to college, new research shows.

    Kids who had the tightest control of their diabetes missed seven sessions a year, while those who had challenges managing their blood sugar levels were absent for 15 session...

    A high number of preteens and teens in the United States have viewed pornography and many have also sent or received nude or seminude photos -- sexting -- over their smartphones, a new study reveals.

    “The prevalence rates we found in this study suggest that school counselors must be prepared to talk about sexting and pornography use with students, and to change the narrative about the...

    Researchers have discovered a link between access to welfare payments and foster care.

    As many as 29,000 fewer children may have entered the foster care system during the 12-year study if U.S. states had made it easier for poor families to receive cash through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

    "The relatively small amount of income provided through...

    Young girls tend to babble their way to bigger vocabularies earlier than boys, and researchers now think they might know why.

    It has nothing to do with gender, and everything to do with parental interaction, researchers assert.

    Parents tend to talk more to young children who have started talking and can respond to them, regardless of gender, according to data derived from more than ...

    Children exposed to the Zika virus may need more support as they start school, even if they were not diagnosed with Zika-related birth defects and congenital Zika syndrome (CZS), a new study suggests.

    Children may still have differences in brain development, including those in thinking skills, mood and mobility, though researchers said some identified in the study may have been a measure ...

    Kids who are overweight or obese often struggle with school work, and now new research provides clues on how excess weight may harm the developing brain.

    “The main takeaway is to raise awareness about brain health consequences of obesity besides physical health consequences, especially since obesity rates are very high and continue to rise,” said study author

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 29, 2022
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  • Exposure to even low levels of alcohol while in the womb can change the structure of the fetus' brain, according to Austrian researchers.

    The study results suggest that pregnant women should strictly avoid alcohol, one author said.

    “Unfortunately, many pregnant women are unaware of the influenc...

    Millions of parents drop their toddlers off at day care centers so they can go to work, but some are racked with guilt about it.

    One of their main concerns? Time spent in group day care could encourage their toddler to start acting out.

    Now, a large, new study suggests that parents can breathe a sigh of relief: Kids who spend long hours in day care centers aren't any more likel...

    Ever wonder why kids seem to pick up new knowledge and skills faster than adults?

    A new study attributes the kids' mental prowess to differences in a brain messenger called GABA.

    "Our results show that children of elementary school age can learn more items within a given period of time than adults, making learning more efficient in children," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 17, 2022
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  • Lead is known to damage young children's brains, and a new study suggests the effects may still be apparent in old age.

    Researchers found that among nearly 1,100 older U.S. adults, those who grew up in cities with lead-contaminated drinking water generally scored worse on tests of memory and thinking skills.

    The findings, experts said, suggest that older adults who were exposed to l...

    Moms who have had emergency surgery during pregnancy can rest assured that exposure to anesthesia is not linked to developmental issues in their children, a new study reveals.

    While surgery and anesthesia are typically avoided during pregnancy, up to 1% of pregnant women may require it for unexpected health

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 28, 2022
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  • A “virtual autopsy” of a mummified 17th century Austrian infant has shed new light on Renaissance childhood — as well as the importance of vitamin D to health.

    The researchers used CT scans to examine the remains, which had been found in an aristocratic Austrian family crypt containing the perfect ...

    Why do some preschoolers refuse naps while others have a meltdown without an afternoon snooze? Researchers suspect it may have a lot to do with a specific memory-related part of the brain.

    While young children all need a lot of sleep, they do vary widely in when they stop napping during the day: Some leave naps behind by the time they are 3, while many others happily take an afternoon nap...

    School-age kids who spend hours a day playing video games may outperform their peers on certain tests of mental agility, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with children who never played video games, those who regularly spent hours gaming had higher scores on two standard cognitive tests: one measuring short-term memory and another gauging impulse control.

    Experts...

    While kids are told not to lie, they also get mixed messages about being honest in different situations.

    In a new study, researchers looked at how adults reacted to kids' levels of honesty in various situations, from telling bold truths to telling subtle lies.

    Among the key findings: Kid...

    The answer to how tall a child will be is typically an estimate based on an average of the parents' heights.

    But an Australian study that included more than 5 million people has found that more than 12,000 genetic variants influence height.

    “Eighty percent of height differences between people are dete...

    When social interaction came to a halt during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, newborn babies missed out on vital communication milestones, researchers say.

    A new Irish study found about 25% of these new babies spent a year without ever meeting a child their own age. Incidental interactions with strangers and community members at grocery stores or play groups didn't happen. They...

    Many language skills are "left brain," but a new study shows that when a newborn suffers a stroke in that region, the brain is able to shift those language duties to the right.

    The researchers said the findings highlight the striking malleabil...

    Sometimes allergies can lead to pink, irritated eyes. But allergic conjunctivitis, or "pink eye" may have a simple fix: physical fitness.

    That's the conclusion of researchers in Taiwan who tracked health data of more than 1.2 million children. The kids were examined at age ...

    For many kids with autism, Rhett, a black Labrador retriever, has been a calming and comforting influence in his seven years as a therapy dog.

    But parents shouldn't assume that a service pooch is the solution for every child on the autism spectrum, a new study...

    Children who fall ill with COVID-19 may have a slightly increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that of more than 285,000 children with COVID, 0.04% were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over the next six months. While that's a small percentage, it was 72% higher than the rate in a comparison group of kids with no history of COVID.

    Experts...

    At the kitchen table, babies trying different foods might look eager or offended, depending on the flavor of what they are asked to eat.

    It turns out infants may develop those taste differences while still in the womb, according to a new study that delivered the first direct evidence that infants can smell and taste while in utero.

    In the study, researchers fed 100 pregnant women a...

    A new study hands parents what seems like a miraculous gift: A simple, free technique that takes just 13 minutes to put wailing infants to sleep.

    Researchers in Japan found that walking around while carrying infants for five minutes calmed the newborns, while another eight minutes of sitt...

    Kids who walk, skateboard or ride their bikes to school when they are young are more likely to keep it up as they get older, reaping the health benefits, recent research suggests.

    “The walk to school is a wonderful moment in the day that provides children a glimpse of living an active lifestyle,” said study...

    Children born as a result of a common fertility procedure involving frozen embryos may have higher risk of cancer, Swedish researchers report.

    In frozen-thawed embryo transfer, an embryo is created in a laboratory from an egg and sperm, frozen and later thawed before implant...

    While half of mothers of children with autism suffer symptoms of depression, a new study has discovered that did not raise the risk of behavioral problems for their kids.

    It was both a surprising and heartenin...

    When teenagers with type 1 diabetes get better control of their blood sugar, their brains may benefit, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that when teenagers started treatment with a newer technology — often dubbed "artificial pancreas" systems ...

    Recent years have seen several high-profile cases of doctors sexually abusing young patients. Now the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is issuing new recommendations aimed at prevention.

    Medical visits are usually a safe place for children and teenagers, but when abuse does happen, it is an egregious violation.

    One reason, the AAP says, is because parents and kids trust that hea...

    Breastfeeding can deliver long-term heart benefits to both mother and child, a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) says.

    The immune systems of newborns and infants can be strengthened by breast milk, which has long been a...

    Kids can take part in sports while on vegetarian and vegan diets, but parents and caregivers must help them select foods that will fuel them and meet their nutrition needs.

    Vegan athletes can become deficient in vitamin B12, vitamin D, long-chain omega-3 fats, riboflavin and calcium, so it's important to find good substitutes, said Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian at Baylor College ...

    While babies born prematurely may lag behind their elementary school peers, they eventually catch up, British researchers report.

    By the end of high school, only the kids born before 32 weeks of gestation were continuing to struggle, according to a new study published online Aug. 17 in the journal

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 18, 2022
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  • Kids who enter preschool with good vocabulary and attention skills have a head start on academic success.

    That's the takeaway from a new study of nearly 900 4-year-olds and their ability to engage with teachers and peers, as well as their involvement in classroom tasks.

    “The levels of ...

    It's well known that exposure to lead can harm young children's brain development. Now a new study suggests that racial segregation may be compounding the detrimental effects of lead on Black children.

    The study, of close to 26,000 schoolchildren, found that Black children with elevated blood lead levels had wo...

    Children born a little early -- before 39 weeks of pregnancy -- are more likely to have symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests.

    While birth before 37 weeks' gestation has known links to hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention, this study inve...

    While some may think of hearing loss as something that happens with age, it can also happen to kids.

    Parents and teachers should consider hearing loss if a child's academic performance declines or he or she develops behavioral issues, lack of focus and depression, the American Academy of Audiology advises.

    “Because children often don't realize they are missing information and may ...

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