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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

07 Sep

Recent Pot Use Tied to Heart Attacks in Young Adults

Consuming marijuana through smoking, vaping or edibles increases the risk of heart attack in adults younger than 45, researchers say.

Health News Results - 369

If you're poor and have a severe type of heart attack, the chance you'll live through it is significantly lower than that of someone with more money, new research shows.

The finding underscores the need to close a divide in health care that hits low-income people hard, said lead researcher Dr. Abdul...

When Hispanic Americans arrive in the emergency room with chest pain, they have to wait longer for care than other people with the same symptoms, a preliminary study finds.

Chest pain, a potential sign of heart attack, is one of the leading reasons people end up in an ER. But the new findings suggest that Hispanic patients may face unnecessary delays in either receiving care, being admitt...

If you're a young adult with prediabetes, you may already know you have a greater than average risk of full-blown diabetes. But you could also be at increased risk for a heart attack, new research shows.

"After taking into account various influencing and modifying factors, we found that young adults with prediabetes had 1.7 times higher chances of being hospitalized for a heart attack com...

"Fill your plate up with colorful fruits and veggies for heart health."

Such customized reminder texts may help folks who have had one heart attack avoid a second one, according to a new study out of Australia.

"Texts provi...

Some smokers use e-cigarettes to try to kick the habit, but new research shows mixing smoking and vaping is no better for your heart health than just smoking.

Among 24,000 men and women, smoking cigarettes and e-cigarettes didn't reduce the risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke or any ...

Your chances of dying or having severe complications from COVID-19 are much higher if you're unvaccinated and have heart problems or heart disease risk factors, researchers warn.

In a new study, British investigators analyzed 110 previous COVID-19 studies that included a total of nearly 49,000 unvaccinated patients.

The researchers found that unvaccinated people with evidence of he...

Long-term survival after a heart attack has improved significantly overall among Medicare beneficiaries, although poorer people and Black Americans have been left behind, a new study claims.

"Our results demonstrate some accomplishments and some work ahead; we are making progress on improving long-term outcome...

Women and people of color with chest pain — the most common symptom signaling a heart attack — face longer waits in U.S. emergency departments than men and white people do, new research reveals.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 4,000 patients, aged 18 to 55, seen for chest pain at emer...

It seemed a simple prospect — take a low-dose baby aspirin tablet once a day and reduce your risk of ever suffering a heart attack or stroke.

But new science has shown it's not that simple.

Noting the drug's risk of dangerous bleeding, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has reversed course and

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2022
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  • Insomnia is widespread in heart disease patients and significantly boosts the risk of heart attack, stroke or other major heart event, a new study says.

    The findings show the need to check for and treat sleep problems in heart disease patients, according to researchers.

    “Our study indicates that insomnia is common in heart disease patients and is linked with subsequent cardiovascu...

    Major heart complications soon after a stroke can put survivors at higher risk for a heart attack, death or another stroke within five years, new research shows.

    Heart problems after a stroke are common and are referred to as stroke-heart syndrome. These heart problems were known to increase stro...

    Warm summer nights may leave you tossing and turning in bed, but that could be the least of your worries. Just a slight rise in summer nighttime temperatures increases the risk of heart-related death for men in their 60s, a new study shows.

    "Considering the growing likelihood of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Heart attack survivors with depression have an increased risk of stroke, and more research is needed to find out why, according to the authors of a new study.

    "There could be a multitude of de...

    If you believe an occasional tipple is good for your heart, a new study may make you reconsider the notion.

    Some previous research has suggested that light drinking may benefit the heart, but this large study concluded that any amount of drinki...

    As if recovering from a heart attack wasn't hard enough, new research shows many patients may suffer severe thinking declines.

    Researchers in Poland found that in the six months after a

  • Consumer news
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  • March 25, 2022
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  • Living in a noisy neighborhood may not only cost you sleep, it could also increase your odds for a heart attack, researchers say.

    They concluded that 1 in 20 heart attacks in New Jersey were associated with noise from highways, trains and air traffic.

    "When people talk about pollution, they're usually talking about particles in the air or water," said lead author Dr. Abel Moreyra, a...

    An increase in heat waves driven by climate change is causing hundreds more heart disease deaths in the United States each year, with men and Black people at particular risk, researchers say.

    Each year, the United States now has about three times as many heat waves as in the 1960s. Heat can put increased strain on the heart and trigger heart attacks and other cardiac problems.

    "Thes...

    Your annual screening mammogram may do more than spot breast cancer early — it may give you a heads up on your heart disease risk, too.

    Digital breast X-rays can also detect a build-up of calcium in the arteries of your breasts, an early sign of heart disease. These whit...

    The lost hour of sleep when clocks spring forward for daylight saving time on Sunday, March 13 can pose risks to your heart -- but there are ways to protect yourself.

    A number of studies have found an increase in heart problems and stroke after the spring time change, according to the American Heart Association.

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  • March 8, 2022
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  • About 2 million adults worldwide undergo heart surgery each year, and checking blood levels of a certain protein could help assess their risk of death within 30 days, a new study shows.

    Blood tests to check levels of troponin (a type of pr...

    It's a fate many older women fear: loneliness and isolation as they age. Now, new research suggests those feelings may also predispose them to heart disease.

    The findings may be especially relevant now because of social distancing required by the pandemic.

    "We are social beings. In this time of COVID-19, many people are experiencing

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  • February 7, 2022
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  • Your heart and brain may often seem at odds, but they have more in common than you think. A new study shows that a heart attack can lead to faster mental decline over the years.

    "We need to realize that what's going on in the heart and brain ar...

    Four in 10 Americans say they've had at least one heart-related issue during the COVID-19 pandemic, and about one in four who have tested positive say COVID has affected their heart health, according to a new online poll.

    Shortness of breath (18%), dizziness (15%), higher blood pressure (15%) and chest pain (13%) were the top problems reported in the survey of 1,000 American adults.

    <...

    Your heart is in an incredibly vulnerable state if you've suffered a heart attack or are fighting heart failure, and cardiac rehabilitation could be an important part of your recovery.

    Unfortunately, not enough older folks appear to be taking advantage of this life-saving therapy.

    Fewer than one in 10 eligible Medicare beneficiaries get recommended heart failure rehab treatments, th...

    Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    It's a familiar trope of TV and movies -- a couple is engaged in passionate sex when the guy's heart suddenly gives out.

    "Usually it's a middle-aged man. Usually he's cheating with somebody else. It's funny, there's this myth in our mind that this can happen," said cardiologist Dr. Martha Gulati, who refers to the concept as the "Hollywood heart attack."

    But ardor simply isn't that ...

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 -- deaths that are considered "premature."

    The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

    WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death for Americans and has shortened life expectancy by nearly two years, a drop not seen since World War II, a new government report shows.

    Life expectancy dropped from 78.8 in 2010 to 77 in 2020 as the age-adjusted death rate increased 17%, going from 715 deaths per 100,000 people in 2019 to 835 d...

    This time of year can be hard on the heart.

    The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

    "The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

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  • December 12, 2021
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  • If you've had a heart attack or stroke, you might want to avoid ultra-processed foods, new research suggests.

    The study found that a high intake of such foods significantly increases the risk of another heart attack or stroke, and it's more likely to be fatal. This was true even in people following what seems to be a heart-healthy diet.

    Ultra-processed foods are made in part or enti...

    Folks who've had a clogged artery reopened probably can stop taking blood thinners sooner than previously thought, a new study argues.

    Patients are regularly prescribed blood thinners for a year or more after angioplasty. This is to make sure that blood doesn't clot inside the metal stent that now holds their artery open. That could cause a heart attack or stroke.

    But heart doctors ...

    A fatal heart attack or stroke is often the first indication of heart disease in middle-aged smokers, according to a new study.

    It also found that heart disease is the leading complication among smokers when compared with deaths from other causes -- including lung cancer. In addition, smoking is associated with developing heart disease at a younger age and shortening a person's life by as...

    Your daily cup of joe might be a quick pick-me-up, but it comes with a mixed bag of good and not-so-good effects on your health, a new study reports.

    Drinking coffee helps people stay more active, but it also significantly robs some of sleep, researchers say.

    And while java doesn't seem to cause irregular rhythms in the upper chamber of the heart, it can cause the lower chamber...

    Urban air cleared during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns as fewer commuters hit the road daily, and that might have resulted in one unexpected heart health benefit for Americans, a new study suggests.

    Those reductions in air pollution appear to be linked to a decrease in heart attacks during the shutdowns, according to research slated for presentation Saturday at the American Heart Associ...

    Bypass surgery is slightly better overall than stenting to open blocked arteries in people with severe coronary artery disease, new research shows.

    But decisions may still need to be made on a case-by-case basis: Stenting appeared more beneficial in some patients, particularly if they didn't have complex disease.

    The findings should help guide decisions about which treatment is best...

    ADHD medications are increasingly being prescribed to older adults, and they may cause a short-term spike in the risk of heart attack, stroke and arrhythmias, a large new study suggests.

    Stimulant medications, such as Ritalin, Concerta and Adderall, are commonly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But they are also increasingly being prescribed "off-label" to ol...

    The number of people experiencing numbness, pins and needles, and burning pain in their feet and toes seems to be on the rise, new research suggests, and some of these folks may be at increased risk for heart trouble.

    Exactly why there has been an uptick in "small fiber neuropathy" is not fully understood yet, but it could be due to the ongoing diabetes and obesity epidemic as both condit...

    People who live in disadvantaged parts of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die young from heart disease as folks in the wealthiest locales, a new study reports.

    In other words, your zip code can tell you as much or more about your heart health risk as your genetic code, said senior researcher Dr. Khurram Nasir, chief of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at Houston Meth...

    The length of a woman's menstrual cycle as she nears menopause could reflect her future risk of heart disease, researchers report.

    Some women's menstrual cycles become longer as they approach menopause, while others' cycles remain stable. This new study found that the women whose cycle increased in length two years before menopause had better measures of vascular health than those who had...

    Most people shouldn't bother taking daily low-dose aspirin to reduce their risk of a first heart attack or stroke, the nation's leading panel of preventive medicine experts announced Tuesday.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a draft recommendation that essentially backs off its previous advice urging many folks to consider taking low-dose aspirin to prevent heart di...

    It's no secret that excess weight is bad for the heart. But a new study suggests that obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight may reverse the related cardiovascular risks.

    Researchers found the odds for high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol were similar in formerly obese Americans who were now at a healthy weight and people who had always had a healthy weight.

    Di...

    For people with diabetes who have a stroke, there may be an ideal blood sugar target to prevent another one or a heart attack, a South Korean study finds.

    To determine average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months, the study team used the hemoglobin A1C test.

    "We know that having diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of having a first stroke," said study a...

    After a heart attack, a smartwatch app may help keep patients from being hospitalized again, researchers say.

    The app helps patients keep track of medications and make lifestyle changes. It may also reduce rehospitalization in the month after discharge by half, according to a new report.

    The American Heart Association says one in six heart attack patients returns to the hospital wit...

    You remember the ad. It asked if you've "got milk?" and said that "milk does a body good."

    So, does it? New research suggests it might.

    In the study, people who consumed more dairy fat actually had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those who drank or ate less dairy, CNN reported.

    "Increasing evidence suggests that the health impact of dairy foods ma...

    Younger women who undergo radiation for cancer in the left breast have a heightened risk of heart disease years later, a new study finds.

    Among women who received radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer, 10.5% developed coronary artery disease over the next 27 years, researchers found. That was close to double the rate among women who had radiation for tumors in the right breast.

    A year of exercise training helped to preserve or increase the youthful elasticity of the heart muscle among people showing early signs of heart failure, a small study shows.

    The new research, published Sept. 20 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, bolsters the idea that "exercise is medicine," an important shift in approach, the researchers wrote.

    The stu...

    If the Alps or the Rockies are on your bucket list, check with your doctor first if you're at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    New advice from the American Heart Association (AHA) suggests certain people take precautions before going to high altitude places.

    These recommendations apply to folks with high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart rhythm abnormalities (arrhy...

    Marijuana has been linked to a doubling in the risk of a heart attack in younger adults, no matter how they use it, a new study reports.

    Eighteen- to 44-year-olds who used pot were twice as likely to have a heart attack compared with non-users, whether they smoked, vaped or ate their weed, researchers found.

    "We found it wasn't only smoking that had this kind of effect. The effect s...

    Feelings of despair and hopelessness can raise the odds of death in people battling heart disease, and new research suggests that where you live, as well as your marital status, can also play a role.

    The study found that heart disease patients who lived in rural areas and were unmarried were more likely to feel hopeless.

    "Because we know hopelessness is predictive of death in p...

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