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Results for search "Travel Safety: Motor Vehicle Injury".

Health News Results - 41

Sparse traffic on U.S. roads during the coronavirus pandemic has spawned a spike in speeding and other types of reckless driving, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) says.

Here are some examples.

Police in Colorado, Indiana, Nebraska and Utah have clocked drivers going more than 100 miles per hour on highways.

In Los Angeles, cars are going as much as ...

Uber and Lyft are a convenient way to get around town and get home after a night of bar-hopping, but crashes involving cars and pedestrians haven't decreased, a new study finds.

These ride-hailing or ride-sharing services have made 11 billion trips in the United States since they began in 2010, and crashes involving drunk drivers have decreased -- but the total number of crashes hasn...

If more women were hired for trucking jobs, the roads would be a lot safer, British researchers suggest.

That's because men, who hold most driving jobs, are more likely to drive dangerously. This puts other road users at risk, said lead researcher Rachel Aldred. She's a reader in transport at the University of Westminster in London.

"Greater gender equity would have a posi...

Walking on America's streets is getting ever more dangerous, a new report shows.

Based on data from the first six months of 2019, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) predicts there were 6,590 pedestrian deaths that year, which would be a 5% increase over the 6,227 pedestrian deaths in 2018.

The 2019 figure is the highest number of such deaths in more than 30 ...

Gun violence appears to deliver more long-term damage to survivors than car crashes do.

"Our study shows that injury, and especially firearm injury, casts a long shadow over the lives of those who survive," said study author Dr. Juan Herrera-Escobar. He is research director of Long-Term Outcomes in Trauma in the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital in B...

Even when they're not high on marijuana, recreational users of the drug display signs of impaired driving, a new study finds.

The findings may come as a surprise to many, said senior study author Staci Gruber, director of Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery (MIND) at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School affiliate in Belmont, Mass.

"People who use cann...

If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

The res...

Electric scooter accidents are sending droves to emergency rooms -- especially young adults, a new study finds.

As e-scooters' popularity has exploded, so have injuries -- skyrocketing 222% between 2014 and 2018 to more than 39,000. Hospital admissions also soared -- 365% to nearly 3,300.

Head injuries made up about a third of the injuries -- twice the rate seen in...

More bicyclists on the road make cycling safer, but head and face injuries still occur, a new study finds.

From 2008 to 2017, even as the number of bike riders increased, the number of head and face injuries stayed steady, according to researchers from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

"We believe this may be due to a safety-in-numbers phenomenon, whereby increased public...

Nearly half of American adults admit that they've fought to stay awake while driving, a new survey finds.

Of the more than 2,000 respondents, 45% said they'd struggled to remain awake while behind the wheel, while 48% said they'd never driven drowsy, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) survey conducted in September.

Each year in the United Sta...

Could America's roads become safer in the future?

Maybe.

A new online survey involving just over 1,400 participants showed that a growing number of American teens are getting their driver's license before age 18, which means more of them are learning to drive under supervised conditions.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety study released Oct. 21 surveyed teens an...

Think the chances that your kid could be hit by a train are slim to none?

New research suggests you should think again.

Issued to coincide with "Rail Safety Week," the Sept. 23 report finds that, on average, a child dies of a train-related injury somewhere in the United States every five days. And for every death, another three children are injured.

The finding ind...

One in three patients who have implanted devices for irregular heartbeats still drive, despite being banned from getting behind the wheel, a new Danish study finds.

It looked at more than 2,500 patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), which deliver an electric shock to correct potentially deadly abnormal heart rhythms.

Some ICD patients are healthy enough ...

Drinking and driving an electric scooter doesn't mix, according to a new study.

Researchers reported serious injuries like brain bleeding or fractures that have happened while riding an electric scooter (e-scooter). Alcohol and drugs were a factor in many of these crashes.

"E-scooters may look like fun and games, but it's a vehicle. It's a motor attached to wheels, and you n...

Everyone has done it: breezing through a red light at the last minute. But a new report shows that deaths caused by drivers taking that chance are on the rise in the United States.

There were 939 people killed in red light running crashes in 2017, a 10-year high and a 28% increase since 2012, according to AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety researchers.

"Drivers who decide...

The Fourth of July holiday is one of the most deadly times on America's roads, so Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is urging everyone to avoid drinking and driving.

"Celebrating our nation's independence with backyard barbecues, fireworks displays and other festivities should be fun, not dangerous," said Bob Garguilo, executive director of MADD Connecticut.

"Celebrate sa...

If Colorado is any indication, the legalization of marijuana does not come without health hazards.

New research shows that while it led to a decline in hospitalizations for chronic pain, there were increases in traffic crashes, alcohol abuse and drug overdoses in the state. However, there was no significant increase in overall hospital admissions.

"We need to think carefully...

Despite countless public service messages warning against texting and driving, more than two-thirds of parents have read a text while behind the wheel and roughly half have written a text while driving, a new survey finds.

Millennial parents were more likely to report distracted driving behaviors, such as reading a text. But both millennial parents (born between 1981 and 1996) and ol...

When a state bans texting while driving, will the number of car crash victims showing up in its emergency rooms drop?

New research suggests the answer is yes.

In the study, states that have full bans in place had an average of 8 percent fewer car crash victims seen in emergency rooms.

"People tend to think of these bans as inconveniences, but they actually do have ...

It's a good thing U.S. drivers are less likely to hit a moose than a deer. Because a run-in with a majestic bull moose is a whole lot deadlier, a new study finds.

The reason is simple -- moose are much larger than deer. Moose weigh 800 to 1,300 pounds and can reach 6 feet, 6 inches at the shoulder. When a car hits a moose, the impact is typically on the animal's long legs, causing it...

The switch to Daylight Saving Time can increase the risk of driver fatigue and crashes, but there are a number of ways to reduce the danger, an expert says.

"Any time change can exacerbate drowsiness because your internal clock has not adjusted to the time change. This can lead to disruptions in sleep until your body adjusts, which can take a few days to a week," said Jeff Hickman, a...

The damage wrought by the opioid epidemic has spread to America's highways, with the percentage of fatal car crashes involving a driver who was high on the powerful painkillers tripling in the past 25 years.

Study co-author Dr. Guohua Li said the finding "adds important information for understanding the ripple effects of the opioid epidemic, particularly its adverse effect on driving...

In states where marijuana is legal, teens smoking pot and then getting behind the wheel of a car is common, a new study finds.

"There's a general public zeitgeist that marijuana is a pretty safe drug," said study co-author Darin Erickson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health.

"In actuality, there hasn't been a lot of research regard...

For the first time in history, Americans' risk of dying from an opioid overdose is higher than their risk of dying in a car accident, the National Safety Council reported Monday.

The chances of dying from an accidental opioid overdose in the United States are now 1 in 96, compared to a 1 in 103 risk of dying in a traffic crash, according to the new analysis of preventable deaths in th...

Medical marijuana may help the thousands of Americans who use it, but far too many of these folks are getting behind the wheel while high, new research shows.

In a poll of medical marijuana patients in Michigan, more than half acknowledged having driven within two hours of consuming a cannabis treatment at least once during the prior six months. About 20 percent they had done so while...

Car crashes and guns have been the two leading killers of kids in the United States for decades, and deaths from both causes are on the rise.

More children have been dying from motor vehicle crashes and firearms injuries since 2013, a new report shows.

Car crashes accounted for 20 percent of all deaths for children aged 19 and younger in 2016, while firearms accounted for 15...

People in cars aren't the only ones who benefit from distracted driving laws: Research shows drops in motorcyclist deaths after such legislation is passed.

In the new study, researchers analyzed 2005-2015 data from across the United States and found that motorcyclist death rates in states with moderate to strong bans on drivers' use of cellphones and other handheld devices were as muc...

Many older drivers take medications known to raise the risk of a crash, a new study shows.

It found that nearly 50 percent of older adults who drive use seven or more medications. Nearly 20 percent take what are called potentially inappropriate medications because they have limited benefits, pose excess risk of harm, or both.

Most of these potentially inappropriate medicatio...

There are wide variations between states when it comes to child restraint rules for ride-share services such as Lyft and Uber, researchers report.

This can cause uncertainty and confusion for parents and other caregivers. Ride-share vehicles typically don't come with a car seat, and an option to request one is available only in some cities, the study authors said.

Parents ca...

Driving under the influence and distracted driving are well-known hazards, but few people think twice about getting behind the wheel when feeling drowsy, a sleep expert warns.

"Drivers can reduce the danger by being aware of risk factors and taking precautions," said Dr. Praveen Rudraraju, who directs the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y.<...

Trick-or-treating is a Halloween tradition that can quickly turn disastrous, with new research showing a more than 40 percent spike in pedestrian deaths on the spooky holiday.

Kids wearing dark costumes, zigzagging across streets and popping out between parked cars are potentially tragic targets for drivers rushing home after work, explained study author Dr. Donald Redelmeier. He is a...

Getting too little sleep at night? If so, your odds for a car crash are rising, new research suggests.

Crash risk is highest if you get fewer than four hours of shuteye a night, scientists found. That's like driving with a blood alcohol concentration roughly 1.5 times the legal limit, the researchers explained.

But even those who sleep fewer than seven hours a night are more...

New cars are now coming out with high-tech safety features designed to prevent crashes. But if you don't know how they work you could be inviting an accident, new research suggests.

These advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) -- including blind-spot monitoring, forward-collision warning and lane-keeping assist -- can, when used properly, make your driving safer. But many drivers...

Following years of decline, fatal car accidents involving teen drivers have accelerated in the United States, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns.

New research also reveals that teenage drivers are more likely to be involved in a serious or deadly crash than any other age group, notes the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The group has updated its 2006 policy statement...

Is it possible that showing teenagers the real-life consequences of risky driving might make them safer drivers?

Maybe, a small study suggests.

Taking teens to the emergency room, intensive care unit and morgue increased their awareness of the results of unsafe driving. But the researchers couldn't prove that the teens actually became more careful drivers.

The rese...

Kids should ride in rear-facing car safety seats until they reach the highest height and weight their seat can hold, a leading pediatricians' group now says.

The previous advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics was to stop using a rear-facing seat when a child was 2 years old.

"Fortunately, car seat manufacturers have created seats that allow children to remain rear-...

Cellphone users blundering into signs, lampposts, other people and traffic have become a recurring sidewalk sight in many places.

And now, new video analysis reveals the extent to which cellphones interfere with a person's ability to hoof it from here to there.

Cellphone use drastically alters a pedestrian's balance, coordination and movement, said senior researcher Mohamed ...

The National Safety Council has a sobering forecast for this Fourth of July.

It estimates that 18,600 people could be seriously injured on U.S. roads and 164 could be killed -- nearly 4 percent more than the number of deaths (157) that occurred in 2012, the last time July 4 fell on Wednesday.

"Independence Day should be about spending time with loved ones and watching firewo...

Data on more than half a million Canadian seniors shows that traffic accident rates fall after drivers undergo a needed cataract surgery.

The effect was relatively modest -- about a 9 percent decline -- but suggest that "improvements in visual function from cataract surgery are associated with decreased driving risks," according to a team led by Dr. Matthew Schlenker, of the Kensingt...

Letting any teen behind the wheel of a car is nerve-wracking for parents, but if your teen has autism, you may wonder if driving is even possible.

Well, a new study offers some comfort because it found that kids with autism who aren't intellectually disabled are probably capable of driving a car safely, though they may need more practice time before they get their license.

T...

A perfect storm of murder, addiction and carelessness has fueled a recent and troubling increase in deaths among U.S. children and teens, a new government report shows.

The total death rate for those aged 10 to 19 rose 12 percent between 2013 and 2016, mostly due to an increase in deaths from accidental injury, homicide and suicide, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...