Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Safety &, Public Health".

25 Jan

More Kids Suffering Eye Injuries From Hand Sanitizers

And a significant number are undergoing surgery for severe eye lesions, researchers say

Health News Results - 1171

If you think you're fine to drive after drinking, there's a good chance you're wrong, new research shows.

The study found that despite being over the legal driving limit, half of the participants believed they were safe to drive.

The study included 90 volunteers, average age 24, in Germany who drank either wine or beer until they reached a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrA...

New York City's ban on a certain type of heating oil led to significant reductions in air pollutants that pose a risk to health, new research shows.

“It is very encouraging to see the overall success of the Clean Heat Program in reducing pollution levels in the city, and particularly exciting to find that the policy is effective in both low- and high-income neighborhoods,” lead author...

Nearly 235,000 pounds of fully cooked ham and pepperoni products were recalled by Michigan-based Alexander & Hornung on Sunday due to possible listeria contamination.

There are no confirmed reports of illness associated with the products that were sold across the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

The recalled ...

It happens very rarely, but most teens and young adults who do experience heart inflammation (myocarditis) after a COVID-19 shot have mild symptoms and recover quickly, new research shows.

“Overwhelmingly, data continue to indicate that the benefits of COVID-19 vaccinat...

You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

"It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

If you're a patient with a weakened immune system, roll up your sleeves to stay safe over the holidays and winter months.

"Immunocompromised patients absolutely should get a flu shot as well as an additional COVID-19 vaccine dose," said Dr. Marwa Kaisey, a neuroimmunologist and assistant professor of neurology at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles.

"Otherwise, they are more likely to hav...

Lab studies show that the mutations found in COVID-19's Delta variant make the virus more resistant to existing vaccines, a potentially ominous development as the new Omicron variant starts to wend its way around the world.

Full vaccination with the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccines still produces enough antibodies to neutralize Delta, British researchers found.

But the Delta variant p...

Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

COVID-19 lockdowns brought surprising news to scientists studying pollution: Cars spew much more ammonia into the air than previously thought.

Ammonia is a common air pollutant that's a major cause of lung and heart disease, especially in cities.

“The tricky question has always been: How do we separate out ammonia concentrations owing to traffic from the ammonia emitted from sourc...

If you're getting together with others outdoors, a windy day might be best, researchers say.

The investigators found that when people socialize outside, the risk of coronavirus infection is as much as 45% greater when there's hardly any breeze than when there are stronger winds.

"The issue is really about an increased danger of infection spread in the presence of stale air as oppose...

Just one day after the first Omicron case was reported in the United States, federal officials announced a second case on Thursday, this time in a Minnesota man who had traveled to an Anime convention in New York City in November.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it is working on the case with the Minnesota Department of Health and the New York City Department of H...

Children and teenagers vaccinated against the mumps virus have accounted for one-third of infections in recent years, a new U.S. government study finds.

The reasons are unclear, and experts stressed that routine childhood vaccination remains the best weapon against mumps -- a contagious infection that is usually mild, but can cause serious complications.

After the mumps vaccine was ...

Hearing dogs make a huge difference in deaf people's lives, a new British study shows.

The dogs are trained to alert deaf people to everyday sounds such as doorbells, human voices, baby monitors and alarm clocks, as well as safety-related sounds such as smoke and intruder alarms. The animals also provide companionship and emotional support.

The trial included 165 people in the Unite...

For those who think vaping is safer than smoking, think again.

A new study warns that vaping triggers the same gene regulation changes that smoking does, so it may raise the risk of cancer and other serious diseases.

"Our study, for the first time, investigates the biological effects of vaping in adult e-cigarette users, while simultaneously accounting for their past smoking exposur...

Americans who are vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19 should have enough antibody protection to prevent severe illness if they become infected with the new Omicron variant, White House COVID response officials said Tuesday.

Omicron has caused concern among medical experts due to a "large number of mutations, around 50, much larger than previous variants," including some "anticipated t...

The first wave of girls to receive the HPV vaccine are much less likely to contract or die from cervical cancer than women just a few years older, a new study reports.

Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), for which a vaccine has been available since 2006.

Cervical cancer deaths and cases have fallen dramatically among 14- to 24-year-old women...

Several Old Spice and Secret aerosol spray antiperspirants and hygiene products have been voluntarily recalled in the United States due to the presence of the cancer-causing chemical benzene, Proctor & Gamble says.

Benzene exposure can occur by inhalation, orally and through the skin. It can lead to cancers including leukemia and blood cancer of the bone marrow, as well as potentially lif...

A weekly dose of deep red light in the morning may protect fading eyesight as people age, U.K. researchers say.

"Using a simple LED device once a week recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like recharging a battery," according to Glen Jeffery, lead author of a small, new study.

In previous work, the researchers found that daily three-minute exposu...

Women getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) now need two or three shots, but an African clinical trial suggests a single dose is just as effective.

The finding could speed up the immunization process in developing countries with high levels of HPV-related cancers and protect many more women more quickly.

"These findings are a gamechanger that may s...

Add an inexpensive gout drug to the growing list of medications touted as potential COVID-19 treatments -- only to offer no apparent benefit.

The anti-inflammatory drug colchicine doesn't lessen COVID severity, the risk of death or shorten hospital stays, a new study reports. Nor does it lower the need for admission...

People will probably need regular booster shots for COVID-19 over the next few years to keep their immune systems on guard against a potentially deadly infection, an infectious disease expert says.

COVID mutations and high transmission rates in some parts of the country mean that even the vaccinated remain at risk for a breakthrough infection, said Dr. Jonathan Abraham, assistant professo...

Debate rages over access to abortion, but experts say the collected medical evidence makes one thing clear — it is a fundamentally safe procedure for women.

Abortion is safer than childbirth and it's also safer than a host of other common procedures — colonoscopy, tonsillectomy and plastic surgery, said Dr. Sarah Prager, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wa...

Kraft Heinz Co. announced that it is recalling certain lots of Country Time Lemonade, Tang, Arizona Tea and Kool-Aid powdered drinks because they may contain small pieces of metal or glass.

The company also

  • Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
  • |
  • November 24, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • One in five adults avoided seeking health care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when they had symptoms suggesting the need for urgent medical attention, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

    "Health care avoidance during COVID-19 may be prevalent amongst those who are in greater need of it in the population, such as older individuals," a team led by Silvan Licher, of Erasmus Univ...

    A widely available drug used to treat alcoholism has potential as a COVID-19 treatment, researchers say.

    The investigators found that people taking disulfiram (Antabuse) for alcoholism had a lower risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and were less likely to die from COVID-19 if infected than those not taking the drug.

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • November 23, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Don't drive drunk. That's simple and obvious advice. And it appears ridesharing services are making it easier for people to take it.

    In a new study that looked at Chicago data, more rideshare trips meant fewer alcohol-involved crashes.

    "This study was designed to look specifically at drunk driver crashing," said study author Christopher Morrison.

    "When there are more rideshare...

    Though airborne exposure causes most cases of COVID-19, the virus lurks on objects near the beds of infected nursing home patients, according to a new study.

    "Coronavirus is ubiquitous and persistent in the rooms of nursing home residents with COVID-19, and highlight the ongoing importance of rigorous cleaning and protection of staff and visitors," first author Dr. Lona Mody said in a Uni...

    If you buy or get items such as furniture or TVs during the holidays, be sure to get anti-tip-over kits for them to protect your children, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    From 2017 through 2019, an average of 11,100 U.S. children were treated each year in hospital emergency rooms for injuries from tip-overs. And between 2000 and 2019, 469 children aged 17 and you...

    There was no smallpox virus in frozen vials recently discovered at a vaccine research facility in Pennsylvania, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

    Instead of the variola virus that causes smallpox, lab tests showed that the vials contained vaccinia, the virus used in smallpox vaccine, according to the agency.

    On Nov. 15, federal officials were alerted...

    Several frozen vials that were labeled "smallpox" have been discovered in a vaccine research facility in Pennsylvania, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

    There is no indication that anyone was exposed to what was in the vials, the agency noted.

    The vials were found by a laboratory worker while cleaning out a freezer in a facility that conducts vaccine research...

    Nearly a third of health care staff in U.S. hospitals were not vaccinated against COVID-19 as of mid-September, a new study shows.

    Researchers analyzed data on more than 3.3 million health care workers at more than 2,000 hospitals nationwide between Jan. 20 and Sept. 15.

    "Our analysis revealed that vaccine coverage among U.S. hospital-based [health care personnel] stalled significan...

    Vaccinated health care workers with breakthrough COVID-19 infections shed less virus than those who are unvaccinated and infected, according to University of California, Los Angeles researchers.

    "SARS-CoV-2 viral loads are known to be a critical driver of transmission," wrote authors led by Dr. Paul Adamson, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases. "Thus,...

    Most people know that sun-sourced vitamin D is good for their bones. So could avoiding the sun to reduce skin cancer risk weaken your bones?

    A new study brings a reassuring answer: "Sun-protective" behavior — wearing long sleeves, seeking shade or using sunscreen — "was not associated with decreased bone mineral density or increased risk of osteoporotic fracture," the researchers conc...

    A case of monkeypox in a traveler who returned to the United States from Nigeria is being investigated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Maryland Department of Health.

    The infected person is currently in isolation in Maryland.

    Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness that typically begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes, and then...

    Nearly 1 in 3 older Americans plan an extended trip next year, and 1 in 4 plan to travel for the holidays, but many will take COVID-19 into account, a new survey shows.

    If COVID cases surge at their destination, 20% said they would definitely change their plans, and another 52% said they might do so.

    "These poll findings are consistent with previous AARP research which shows that op...

    WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) – When young people are allowed to give their own consent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, vaccination rates are higher, new research shows.

    The new study suggests that allowing teens to consent without parental involvement could be an important strategy for boosting HPV vaccination rates. This consent is already a policy in several U.S....

    For Emily Litvin, this Thanksgiving is going to look different from the last one and she couldn't be happier about it.

    "I'm so excited to have some sort of normalcy, especially for my daughter and her cousins. It's nice for them to all get together and experience the traditions that we grew up with," said Litvin, a schoolteacher who lives near Columbus, Ohio. "We're so excited."

    But...

    A young boy who was injured at the Astroworld Festival in Houston has become the 10th person to die from a huge crowd surge at the event.

    Ezra Blount, 9, was trampled at the festival and had been placed in a medically induced coma in an attempt to deal with severe brain, liver and kidney trauma, attorneys for his family said last week, CBS News reported.

    "The Blount family ...

    COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective for most cancer patients, a new study confirms.

    Cancer patients have an increased risk of severe illness and death from COVID because their immune systems have been weakened by their disease or treatments.

    "We pursued this study because there were limited data on the safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in people with active cancer; no published pro...

    Parent-collected nasal swab samples from kids could be as good at detecting respiratory infections such as COVID-19 as those taken by nurses, but that's not the case with saliva samples, British researchers say.

    Respiratory infections such as colds and flu are among the most common illnesses in kids treated by primary care doctors. COVID-19 is also a respiratory infection.

    "Our...

    The world faces an increased risk of a measles outbreak because 22 million infants did not get their measles shots last year due to the pandemic, the World Health Organization and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Wednesday.

    They said that 3 million fewer infants were vaccinated against measles in 2020 than in 2019, and just 70% of infants received both doses of the t...

    About 900,000 U.S. children aged 5 to 11 received their initial dose of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine during the first week of eligibility for that age group, the Biden administration said Wednesday.

    Not only that, nearly 700,000 more are scheduled in the coming days, health officials added.

    The low-dose Pfizer vaccine for younger children was approved on Nov. 2 and the first doses w...

    The COVID-19 pandemic has offered some lessons on respiratory disease transmission, and now a new review suggests that hospitals could use those insights to create even smarter infection-control policies.

    The review, published Nov. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, suggests that some longstanding infection-control tactics at hospitals are "outdated."

    And certain changes, like gr...

    While the lockdowns of the pandemic may have done the planet's atmosphere a favor, a new study predicts that discarded masks, gloves and face shields will add more than 25,000 tons of plastic waste to the world's oceans.

    Researchers from Nanjing University's School of Atmospheric Sciences in China and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Scripps Institution of Oceanography used ...

    The sale of unproven and unapproved stem cell treatments has skyrocketed in the United States, according to a new five-year study.

    The study found a fourfold jump since 2016 in the availability of the treatments, which claim to do everything from relieving pain to slowing aging.

    People who use these treatments are needlessly spending thousands of dollars and could be putting their h...

    Working in an already dangerous environment, the blood pressure of firefighters jumps when they get an emergency call, new research shows.

    That could be risky for those who already have high blood pressure, experts say.

    "All emergency and first responders should be aware of their health," said senior author Deborah Feairheller, director of the clinical cardiac program at the Univer...

    Setting your clocks back an hour this Sunday also means it's time to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    Working alarms are especially important because people are spending more time at home due to the pandemic, which means furnaces, fireplaces and other fuel-burning appliances are being used mo...

    At a veterinary clinic in the United Kingdom, the staff noticed a sudden and atypical increase in cats and dogs who were experiencing myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle.

    Was it a coincidence that these animals were showing up severely ill from a condition that has been linked to COVID-19 just as the highly contagious Alpha variant was circulating?

    Apparently not.

    Most folks groan when the time comes to either "spring forward" or "fall back" an hour, with the waxing and waning of daylight saving time.

    But that one-hour time shift — which occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday — is more than just a minor annoyance, sleep experts say.

    Research has shown that deliberately messing with our internal clock twice a year increases our risk of accident, illness ...

    Many young Americans with asthma aren't sufficiently prepared by their childhood care providers to transition to adult care, a small new study shows.

    It's important for youth with asthma to understand their asthma-related medical needs will likely change as they age, and they may need to switch providers, experts say.

    "Teens who are about to go off to college are at an ideal stage t...

    Show All Health News Results