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Results for search "Aging: Misc.".

05 Aug

Making Time for Friends May Protect Your Brain Health

Being socially active in middle age may lower your risk of dementia, study finds

Health News Results - 288

People with physically demanding jobs take more sick leave. They also have higher unemployment rates and shorter work lives, a new Danish study finds.

"This study showed that high physical work demands are a marked risk factor for a shortened expected working life and increased years of sickness absence and unemployment," study co-author Lars Andersen and colleagues wrote. Andersen is...

Many older women struggle with urinary tract infections, and researchers now think they know why.

A big reason is because their bladder walls can be invaded by several species of bacteria, a recent study found.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common type of bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. UTI recurrence rate...

Want to give your brain a boost? Go for a swim, take a walk, or spin your partner on the living room floor.

A new study finds that aerobic exercise can improve older adults' thinking and memory, even if they're longtime couch potatoes.

This type of exercise increases blood flow to the brain and counters the effects of normal aging, according to the study published online May...

Older Americans were going hungry even before the coronavirus pandemic short-circuited the nation's food supply, a new poll finds.

Before the COVID crisis, 1 in 7 adults ages 50 to 80 had difficulty getting enough food because of high costs or other factors, according to the National Poll on Healthy Aging conducted by the University of Michigan.

The number unable to obtain ...

If you're worried about developing Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that eating more fruits or drinking more tea or red wine might help protect your brain.

People who had the lowest amounts of fruits -- like apples and berries -- and red wine and tea in their diets were two to four times more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease or another related dementia, the study found...

Before the COVID-19 pandemic upended people's lives, Americans were already feeling more stressed than they did a generation ago. Now, new research finds that no group is feeling the impact of additional stress more than middle-aged people.

The study found that most age groups reported an increase of 2% more daily stress in 2012 than they did in 1995. But middle-aged folks -- 45- ...

If you're a grandparent, shaking a leg with your grandchild might benefit both of you.

That's the upshot of a new study from Israel, where researchers examined how dancing together affected 16 grandmas and granddaughters. The takeaway: It can encourage exercise and deepen ties between the two generations.

Dancing "promoted physical activity even when the body was fatigued an...

The coronavirus hits older people and those with chronic medical conditions hardest. But many of these folks didn't take the virus seriously as the outbreak took off in the United States, a new study finds.

Before stay-in-place orders were announced, investigators called nearly 700 people in the Chicago area who were part of five U.S. National Institutes of Health studies. Most were ...

Eating a Mediterranean diet that's high in vegetables, whole grains and fish could reduce your risk of mental decline, two studies from the U.S. National Eye Institute (NEI) suggest.

"We do not always pay attention to our diets. We need to explore how nutrition affects the brain and the eye," lead author Dr. Emily Chew said in an NEI news release. She is director of the institute's di...

People who carry a gene called APOE4 face an increased risk of Alzheimer's. But that effect may be lessened if they got luckier with a different gene, researchers have found.

Scientists have long known that the APOE gene is the strongest genetic influence over whether people develop Alzheimer's late in life. Those who carry a form of the gene called E4 have a higher-than-average risk....

If you're a middle-aged woman, it's not too late to make lifestyle changes that could significantly reduce your risk of stroke, researchers say.

"We found that changing to a healthy lifestyle, even in your 50s, still has the potential to prevent strokes," said lead author Goodarz Danaei, an associate professor of cardiovascular health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

...

Mindfulness may explain why many older people feel their life has gotten better with age, a new study suggests.

Mindfulness is being aware of your experiences and paying attention to the present moment in a purposeful, receptive and non-judgmental way, and it can help reduce stress and promote good mental health, according to the Flinders University researchers.

The study a...

Once infected with the new coronavirus, a 20-something has about a 1% chance of illness so severe it requires hospitalization, and that risk rises to more than 8% for people in their 50s and to nearly 19% for people over 80, a comprehensive new analysis finds.

On the other hand, the death rate from COVID-19 is significantly lower than that seen in prior estimates, the new ...

Blood pressure that goes down when you stand up is associated with frailty and falls in older people, according to a new study that advocates more testing.

The research, published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, delved into the relationship between geriatric patients and orthostatic hypotension - a type of low blood pressure that occurs when you stand ...

Your teeth provide a detailed account of your life, much as a tree's rings record its history, a groundbreaking study shows.

"A tooth is not a static and dead portion of the skeleton. It continuously adjusts and responds to physiological processes," said lead study author Paola Cerrito, a doctoral candidate studying anthropology and dentistry at New York University (NYU) in New York ...

Certain combinations of cholesterol and blood pressure drugs may do more than help the heart -- they might also lower a person's risk of dementia, a new study finds.

The drugs in question include two common types of blood pressure medications -- ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) -- as well as cholesterol-lowering statins.

It's long been known that k...

Many U.S. primary care doctors worry they aren't ready to care for the growing ranks of Americans with Alzheimer's disease, a new report suggests.

In a Alzheimer's Association survey, half of primary care doctors said the U.S. medical profession is unprepared for the coming surge in Alzheimer's cases.

Right now, it's estimated that more than 5 million Americans age 65 and ol...

Take a walk, weed your garden, go for a swim or dance -- it could keep your brain from shrinking as you age, a new study suggests.

Being physically active may keep your brain four years younger than the rest of you, which might help prevent or slow the progression of dementias like Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

"We recently published a paper using information of bo...

Physical activity may help seniors live longer and healthier -- and exercise doesn't have to be intense, two new studies say.

"Finding a way to physically move more in an activity that suits your capabilities and is pleasurable is extremely important for all people, and especially for older people who may have risk factors for cardiovascular diseases," said Barry Franklin, past chair ...

Older Americans often return home from the hospital with disabilities they didn't have before, a new study finds.

These new problems can lead to difficulties with daily activities, such as bathing and dressing, shopping and preparing meals, and getting around inside and outside the home.

Such struggles can lead to re-hospitalization, having to go to a nursing home and perman...

If you're over 65 and sleeping well at night, yet find yourself nodding off during the day, you may have a higher risk of developing new medical conditions like diabetes and cancer.

New research found that people who were excessively tired during the day had about twice the risk of being diagnosed with high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or cancer.

"Healthy people, withou...

U.S. life expectancy hasn't kept up with other wealthy nations and experts have cited health care, drug addiction and mental health woes as possible causes.

But maybe the key to longevity can be found in the classroom, new research suggests.

In the new study, a team from Yale and the University of Alabama-Birmingham sought to tease out the impact of race and education on l...

Americans may want to rethink the stereotype of the pot-loving teen: More U.S. seniors are using the drug now than ever before.

The proportion of folks 65 and older who use pot stands at 4.2%, up from 2.4% in 2015, according to figures from the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

"The change from 2.4 up to 4.2, that's a 75% increase," said senior researc...

There may be something about a patient's age of 80 that makes doctors alter their heart attack treatment decisions -- consciously or not, new research suggests.

In a study of U.S. heart attack patients, researchers found that just one month in age made a difference in whether doctors performed bypass surgery -- one of the treatments for the artery blockages that cause heart attacks.

The so-called Mediterranean diet is already considered one of the healthiest for your heart, and now scientists say it may give your gut bacteria a boost, too.

The diet is typically high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, olive oil and fish, and low in red meat and saturated fats. The new study finds that older adults who eat a Mediterranean diet tend to have more types of gut bacte...

Americans who grew up in the swath of the South known as the Stroke Belt are more likely to develop thinking declines later in life, even if they moved away as adults, a new study suggests.

But people who grew up elsewhere and moved to the Stroke Belt are less likely to succumb to so-called cognitive decline than if they'd lived there all their lives, researchers found.

"A...

A large fraction of Americans nearing retirement age are worried they can't afford health insurance now, much less when they quit working to enjoy the good life, a new survey shows.

One in every four people between 50 and 64 are not confident they'll be able to afford health insurance during the next year, and nearly half worry they won't be able to afford coverage once they retire, r...

Missing just one eye doctor appointment can result in vision loss in older adults with macular degeneration, a new study warns.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, and these findings show the need for patients to keep all scheduled appointments with an ophthalmologist, the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine researchers sa...

Many hospitals use bedside "sitters" to protect patients from falling, but a new review finds little evidence the tactic works.

However, researchers said the problem is a lack of rigorous studies -- and not proof that bedside sitters are ineffective. So it would be premature to abandon the practice.

"We've been doing this for years," said Dr. Cathy Schubert, a geriatrics spe...

Discrimination based on age -- ageism -- is widespread throughout the world, and it takes a toll, new research reveals.

The study of more than 7 million people aged 50 and older in 45 countries found that age affected whether or not they got medical treatment and, whether the treatment, its length and frequency were appropriate.

The investigators reviewed 422 published st...

After four years of declines, life expectancy in the United States increased in 2018, health officials reported Thursday.

The jump in longevity comes as deaths from opioid overdoses dropped for the first time in 28 years, as did deaths from six of the 10 leading causes.

The new data could be a glimmer of good news for Americans' health, with recent declines in average lifesp...

When it comes to parts of your brain, bigger isn't necessarily better.

Experts long believed that a bigger hippocampus meant better memory. But new research finds that the size of this seahorse-shaped structure deep in the brain doesn't always predict learning and memory abilities.

Researchers looked at more than 330 older adults in Germany and found that a larger hippocampu...

The racism black Americans face may age them prematurely, a new study suggests.

This aging is occurring at the cellular level -- specifically, the shortening of telomeres, researchers say.

Telomeres are the repetitive sequences of DNA that sit at the tips of your chromosomes -- like the plastic caps at the ends of a shoelace -- and help keep the chromosomes from fraying. <...

If you want to slow down the aging process, it might not hurt to replace whole milk with skim, new research suggests.

The study of over 5,800 U.S. adults found that those who regularly indulged in higher-fat milk had shorter telomeres in their cells -- a sign of accelerated "biological aging."

The findings do not prove that milk fat, per se, haste...

It's a question many aging Americans face: Is it time to replace my aching knee, or should I wait?

New research suggests that for far too many patients, the procedure is done either too late or too soon.

Much of the success of knee replacement surgery for knee osteoarthritis depends on timing, but a team at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago fou...

Women who exercise throughout life may keep their muscle power as they age, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., examined muscle strength, power and the size and type of muscle fibers in the thighs of three groups of women.

Seven women in one group were over 70 and had exercised regularly for nearly 50 years. The seco...

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

For decades, scientists have known that Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by the buildup of clumps of amyloid protein between brain cells. Could these plaques be causing the disease?

That's been a prevailing theory driving Alzheimer's research for years. But a new study suggests the strategy could be wrong.

Researchers reporting Dec. 30 in the journal Neurology have...

Diets heavy in red meat and fatty foods could help spur a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, new research suggests.

The study found that people who ate more typical Western diets were three times more likely to develop an eye condition that robs you of your central vision -- late-stage age-related macular degeneration.

"What you ea...

Caring for a grandchild might be the best way to fight the isolation of old age, new research suggests.

This conclusion is based on 2014 data collected as part of an ongoing German survey of older adults.

Among the nearly 3,900 grandparents in the survey, more than 1,100 said they cared for a grandchild. Those who had grandchildren to care for had lower scores on loneliness...

Seniors in cardiac intensive care units may suffer delirium and other problems if doctors only focus on their heart, a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement says.

Older adults in the cardiac ICU require different care from younger patients, according to the statement. They're likely to be frail, have other medical conditions and use multiple medications.

Do you feel like you know why you're here?

The answer to that question could determine how you feel day-to-day.

If you've found meaning in your life, you're more likely to be both physically and mentally healthy, a new study reports.

On the other hand, people restlessly searching for meaning in their life are more likely to have worse mental well-being, with their ...

Despite media stories about a "loneliness epidemic" plaguing the elderly, two new studies find that they feel no more lonely than their peers from past generations.

The studies -- one in the United States, one in the Netherlands -- reached the same basic conclusion: Yes, people tend to feel more lonely after age 75 or so. But today's older adults are no more likely to feel isolated or...

Know any folks who are just too full of themselves? Rest assured: They'll probably get over it eventually.

That's because narcissism tends to decline with age, according to what researchers described as the longest study ever of the personality disorder.

For the study, a Michigan State University team looked at nearly 750 people to assess how narcissism changed between ages...

Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly.

New research suggests it's not the stuff of science fiction anymore.

The scientists analyzed plasma -- the cell-free, fluid part of blood -- from more than 4,200 people between the ages of 18 and 95, and found a link between 373 proteins and aging.

"We've known for a long time that measuring ce...

Playing cards and board games like chess, bingo and Scrabble might be the mental workout you need to keep your wits as you age, Scottish researchers suggest.

People in their 70s who regularly play board games score higher on tests of memory and thinking skills than those who don't. And 70-somethings who step up their game-playing are more likely to maintai...

Despair, as evidenced in rising rates of drug abuse and suicide, may be eroding the average life expectancy of Americans, a new study finds.

Deaths among working-age adults, especially, have been increasing in the United States for decades, particularly in economically struggling parts of the nation such as the "Rust Belt" and Appalachia, the researchers reported.

These earl...

The brains of middle-age adults may be aging prematurely if they have obesity or other factors linked to cardiovascular disease, new research has found.

Almost one-quarter of adults have metabolic syndrome, a set of factors that in combination amplify a person's risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke and other illnesses. In the new research, participants were considered metabolicall...

Concerns that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can impair brain health appear to be unfounded, according to new research.

"Statins won't make you stupid or cause memory loss," said lead researcher Dr. Katherine Samaras, a professor of medicine at St. Vincent's Clinical School of Medicine in Darlinghurst, Australia.

And for some people at risk of dementia, statins like L...

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