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Results for search "Fiber, Dietary".

Health News Results - 16

Parents frazzled by their little ones' finicky food choices often sigh in exasperation, thinking: "They'll grow out of it by college."

Maybe not, suggests a new study from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Some young people continue their picky eating into early adulthood, often restricting their diets to 10 foods or even fewer.

Such a limited diet can mean they're not getting...

Whole grains can help older adults maintain a thinner waist, lower blood pressure and lower blood sugar, new research suggests.

Just three servings a day may do the trick, the authors said.

One serving is a slice of whole-grain bread, a half-cup of rolled oat cereal, or a half-cup of brown rice.

Researchers noted that their study -- partially funded by the General Mills Bell ...

More and more Americans are seeking out healthier, greener and more ethical alternatives to meat, but are plant-based alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat truly nutritious substitutes?

The answer is yes, according to new research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. It found the imitation meats to be a good source of fiber, folate and iron while containing ...

TUESDAY, June 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) - If you're like most American adults, it might be time to reach for a piece of fruit, a plate of vegetables or a bowl of whole grains.

Only 7% of adults get enough fiber, a type of carbohydrate that passes through the body undigested and supports not only regular bowel movements, but also offers important health benefits. Too little fiber is associa...

People who eat plenty of vegetables, fish and fiber may have more inflammation-fighting bacteria in their guts, but fast-food lovers may be feeding inflammatory microbes.

That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at people's diet habits and the makeup of their gut "microbiome."

The term refers to the vast collection of bacteria and other microbes that naturally dwell in the g...

When it comes to guarding against colon cancer, what you eat is everything.

You can reduce your risk of colon cancer by eating five food types, an expert says. These include: vegetables; whole grains; legumes; nuts and seeds; and fiber-rich fruit.

"Vegetables contain cancer-preventing nutrients called carotenoids and flavonoids," said Amy Rosenfeld, program coordinator of community ...

A trip down a grocery store's baking goods aisle can leave you in a daze these days if you're thinking about replacing white or all-purpose flour with one of the many alternatives on shelves.

In recent years, the pantry staple used for baking and making pasta has become a dietary public enemy, giving way to healthier nut and seed flours, such as almond, chickpea and even banana.

But...

New research reinforces advice to include more whole grains in your diet.

A diet heavy in "refined" grains (such as white bread, cookies and muffins) may increase your risk for heart disease and early death, while whole grains may lower it, according to the study.

"We encourage people to have moderate consumption of carbohydrates and to have different types of grain, especially whol...

Certain nutrients, foods and medicines may help protect you against colon cancer, a large research review suggests.

A team of international researchers led by Dr. Marc Bardou, of Dijon Bourgogne University Hospital in France, reviewed about 80 studies that examined how diet and certain medicines affected colon cancer risk. The studies were published between September 1980 and June 201...

Whether she gets it from fruits, beans, grains or vegetables, dietary fiber appears to at least slightly lower a woman's risk for breast cancer, a comprehensive new review finds.

The review covered data from 20 different trials involving millions of women. It found that high levels of total fiber consumption "was associated with an 8% lower risk of breast cancer," compared to low ...

If you want to reduce bloating when eating a high-fiber diet, try making it carbohydrate-rich rather than protein-rich, new study findings suggest.

Bloating is a common side effect that discourages many people from adopting a high-fiber diet.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from a clinical trial involving 164 participants who followed heart-healthy, high-fiber diets...

A fiber-rich diet appears to help people with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes in multiple ways, lowering their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, a new study suggests.

High blood pressure (hypertension) and diabetes raise the risk for heart disease, and diet may help keep it at bay, researchers say.

"This study helps us determine three important thi...

If you often feel bloated after a meal, don't be too quick to blame high-fiber foods. The real culprit might surprise you.

Your gut may be rebelling because you're eating too much salt, a new study suggests.

"Sodium reduction is an important dietary intervention to reduce bloating symptoms and could be used to enhance compliance with healthful high-fiber diets," said study...

The more we learn about fiber, the more important the recommendation to get enough of it becomes.

Key Health Benefits of Fiber

  • Lowering cholesterol
  • Lowering blood sugar
  • Easing elimination
  • Improving heart health
  • Possibly reducing colon cancer risk
  • Helping with weight control

"Fiber" is actually an ...

For nutrient-dense foods that are low in calories, it's hard to beat berries. But it's also hard to pay what they cost out of season.

Frozen berries are a healthy freezer staple that taste as good as fresh, and are a lot more budget-friendly.

Raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and cranberries (they're not just for cranberry sauce) are all superfoods -- low...

A large, new analysis helps confirm that eating lots of grains, vegetables and fruit lowers your risk of dying early from cancer or heart disease.

When compared with those who consume very little fiber, people at the high end of the fiber-eating spectrum saw their risk for dying from heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and/or colon cancer plummet by 16 to 24 percent, investigators ...