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Health News Results - 158

Many American cancer survivors struggle to pay for their medical care and have to cut back on spending, dip into their savings, or change their living situation.

These problems are more common among those under 65 than among older survivors, a new survey reveals.

Researchers focused on 401 cancer survivors, ages 18 to 64, and 562 who were 65 and older.

Among the you...

Minority women with breast cancer are less likely to have insurance, which could lower their odds of survival, researchers say.

"Having adequate health insurance for all could reduce the persistent racial outcome disparities in breast cancer," said study lead author Dr. Naomi Ko, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

She added that early d...

Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

"Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much...

There are significant differences in rates of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes between subgroups of Hispanic and Asian Americans, a federal government study finds.

Hispanics and Asians represent 23% of the U.S. population and are expected to account for 38% by 2060.

And, these groups may be at higher risk for type 2 diabetes due to genetic, lifestyle and environmen...

The number of Americans who have a primary care doctor is shrinking -- with potential consequences for their health, researchers say.

Their new study found that in 2015, an estimated 75% of Americans had a primary care provider -- down from 77% in 2002. The declines were most pronounced among people under 60: For Americans in their 30s, for example, the figure dropped from 71&...

The daily use of low-dose aspirin against heart disease may have taken another knock.

New research shows that the practice may not provide black Americans with any lowering of their heart attack risk.

Researchers analyzed 11 years of data from more than 65,000 people, ages 40-79, living in the American Southeast. More than two-thirds of the participants were black, and about...

A national program to fight high blood pressure by sending pharmacists to black barbershops could prevent thousands of strokes, heart attacks and deaths, and save the health care system $870 million a year, a new analysis shows.

The research, led by Dr. Dhruv S. Kazi of the Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, built on th...

Following a vegan diet for five weeks may decrease risk factors for heart disease, new research shows.

The study included 50 African Americans who were asked to eat only prepared meals delivered to their homes. A cardiovascular risk calculator was used to assess their risk of heart attack or stroke over the next 10 years. For 36 participants who had pre- and post-diet risk scores, th...

The extra care that black women's hairstyles can require is often a barrier to exercise, but many U.S. health care providers aren't even aware of the problem, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the department of family medicine at Ohio State University, and found that 95% of them sometimes/often discuss exercise with bl...

Infants are more likely to be born with serious heart defects if their homes are in neighborhoods that are polluted or economically deprived, a new study finds.

Congenital heart defects – abnormalities in the heart or nearby blood vessels that arise before birth – affect an estimated 1.3 million Americans. At least 8 in every 1,000 babies have some form of congenital hear...

About 1 in 4 young adults has high blood pressure. But few are getting treated, with new research concluding black young adults are especially vulnerable.

In a study that included 15,171 black, Mexican American and white adults, researchers found that nearly 31% of black young adults had high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. It was the highest rate among the three grou...

Racial bias among health care providers limits black Americans' odds of receiving a heart transplant, a new study finds.

Researchers asked 422 U.S. physicians, nurses and other hospital decision-makers to review the hypothetical cases of black men and white men with heart failure and to decide if the patients should be referred for a heart transplant.

The hypothetical cases ...

Only two-thirds of lung cancer patients in the United States get the minimal recommended treatment, a new study finds.

And race and age appear to play a role in who gets the best care, the researchers said.

Black patients were only 78% as likely to receive the minimum care, compared with white patients, the findings showed. Meanwhile, those aged 80 and older were onl...

Higher levels of education may counter the genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease among older black adults, a new study indicates.

"This suggests that education can buffer the effects of the APOE e4 gene on episodic memory retention and working memory, which are usually the first types of memory to be affected in people with Alzheimer's," said study first author Jet Vonk. She is a postdo...

If you're black or Hispanic and hospitalized for heart failure, new research suggests you're less likely to be treated in special cardiac care units.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on nearly 2,000 patients treated for heart failure at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston over 10 years.

"These outcomes are both unjust and avoidable, and in no way unique to a singl...

American Indians have a higher rate of the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation than other racial/ethnic groups, a new study suggests.

Commonly called a-fib, the heart rhythm disorder affects about 2.7 million people in the United States, putting them at increased risk of stroke and other heart diseases.

For this study, researchers analyzed 300,000 new cases of a...

There are significant racial disparities in treatment of U.S. patients with multiple myeloma, a new study shows.

Researchers reviewed nationwide data on 3,504 white, 858 black and 468 Hispanic patients treated from 2007 to 2013.

The average time between multiple myeloma diagnosis and start of treatment was 2.7 months for whites; 4.6 months for Hispanics; and 5.2 months for b...

Nearly a third of U.S. heart patients die at home, which is more than the number who die in the hospital, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on more than 12 million heart disease patients who died between 2003 and 2017. They looked at whether the deaths occurred in a hospital, home, nursing or long-term care facility, inpatient hospice, or elsewhere (outpatient medica...

Chronically high levels of stress may increase black Americans' risk of high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

"Given the disproportionately high burden of hypertension in African-Americans, determining if chronic stress increases the risk of hypertension in this population is an important question that could guide prevention strategies," said lead study author Tanya Spruill, an a...

Historically, black teenagers in the United States have had lower suicide rates than whites. But a new study finds that more black teens have been attempting suicide in recent years -- and experts are not sure why.

Researchers at New York University found that between 1991 and 2017, there was an increase in the number of black teenagers who said they'd att...

If you're Hispanic and missing out on needed sleep, a new study suggests that could make you more prone to memory problems and possibly Alzheimer's disease.

"This finding is particularly important because Hispanics have a significantly higher risk of Alzheimer's disease compared with non-Hispanic whites," said study leader Dr. Alberto Ramos. He is a sleep ...

If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Cancer is typically diagnosed by a specialist, but 20% to 50% of cancers are only caught during an ER visit, researchers said.

"Emergency room detection of cancer provides a window to understanding ...

One of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes is excess weight. But you don't have to be overweight to have the disease -- and new research revealed that some racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to have diabetes at lower weights.

"Patients who belong to one of the high-prevalence racial or ethnic groups may be at risk for diabetes or prediabetes even if the...

The gap in death rates between U.S. whites and minority groups has been narrowing in recent years, but a new study suggests that trend stopped between 2009 and 2012.

"After years of progress in reducing racial/ethnic mortality disparities, our study shows that progress among most racial/ethnic and age groups has stalled and/or reversed in the U.S. over the last decade," explained rese...

Checking blood pressure at home or elsewhere outside a doctor's office could help predict a certain heart problem among black adults better than the same check done during a medical visit, new research suggests.

The study published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension sought to shed new light on a long-known issue: High blood pressure is more common an...

Autism rates among U.S. children are rising fastest among blacks and Hispanics, researchers say.

"We found that rates among blacks and Hispanics are not only catching up to those of whites -- which have historically been higher -- but surpassing them," said study author Cynthia Nevison, a research scientist at the University of Colorado Boulder.

"These results suggest that a...

Despite calls for more diversity among doctors in the United States, a new study shows that minorities remain underrepresented in medical schools.

Researchers found that between 2002 and 2017, the actual number of minority students in medical schools increased, but the rate of increase was slower than that of age-matched members of those minorities in the U.S. population.

By...

Pregnancy is a far riskier undertaking for many minority women than it is for white women in the United States, a new government study shows.

The chances of dying from pregnancy complications is two to three times higher for black, American Indian and Alaska Native women than it is for white women.

"These disparities are devastating for families and communities, and we must ...

Asian heart failure patients who also have type 2 diabetes can develop changes in the structure of their heart and are at increased risk for hospitalizations and premature death, a new study finds.

Diabetes is on the rise worldwide, and it's common for patients to have both diabetes and heart failure.

There has been extensive research into the combination among Western patie...

Excess weight, especially a "spare tire" around the middle, increases the risk of an earlier death for Hispanics, a large new study suggests.

The study found that for every 5 point increase in body mass index above 25, the risk of dying prematurely went up by 30%.

Body mass index (BMI) is an estimate of a person's fat levels based on height and weight. BMI that fall...

Black and Hispanic people having a stroke are less likely than their white counterparts to get treatments proven to reduce death and improve quality of life, new research shows.

For strokes caused by a clot, the gold standard treatment is a clot-busting drug called alteplase, according to guidelines from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. Some people migh...

High blood pressure exacts a far greater toll on poor people than it does on affluent Americans, a new, national study finds.

The data from the clinical trial, which was designed to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), showed that poor people were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled over the course of six years. They were also more likely to die, and to die of ...

A "dual burden" of serious maternal complications and premature birth occurs in about one in 270 births, a new study finds.

But hospital staff are often blind to the stress caused by this double whammy, researchers say.

"The situation of combined maternal and newborn complications is likely to be extremely stressful for families concerned for both the mother's and the infa...

Many studies have uncovered racial gaps in health care in the United States, but now a new review confirms that the disparity begins at birth.

The review, of 41 studies, found that infants born to minority women typically received poorer care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) compared with white newborns.

The finding was often related to lower-quality care in hospit...

The number of preterm births to Hispanic women in the United States inched up shortly after the 2016 election -- raising the question of whether the political climate played a role, researchers say.

The study, of births between 2009 and 2017, found an uptick in preterm deliveries among Hispanic women that occurred in the nine months after President Trump was elected.

During ...

A new study confirms that when it comes to assessing heart health, an important question a doctor can ask an African American woman is, "Did you have complications during a pregnancy?"

The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, analyzed data collected on 439 African American women who had a coronary CT angiogram...

Cardiac arrest is rare in children. But a new study finds that if it does happen, kids are less likely to get life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they're black and living in a poor neighborhood.

In fact, these kids were much less likely to receive CPR from a bystander than white children living in any type of neighborhood, the research showed.

Children in oth...

If you struggle with infertility, chances are you will be twice as likely to get treatment for the heartbreaking condition if you are white, college-educated or affluent.

So claims a new study that analyzed data from more than 2,500 women aged 20 to 44 who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2013 and 2016.

Nearly 12.5% of the wo...

Tragically, teens can be vulnerable to suicide as they navigate the emotional pitfalls of growing up, and a new U.S. study suggests black teens might be the most vulnerable of all.

Suicide deaths among black females aged 13 to 19 rose 182% between 2001 and 2017, while the rate among black teen males rose 60% during that same period.

The study also found that the meth...

One-third of U.S. cancer survivors have chronic pain, and 1 in 6 have levels that restrict their daily activities, a new study finds.

"The prevalence of chronic pain and high impact chronic pain among cancer survivors in our study was almost double that in the general population, suggesting there are important unmet needs in the large and growing community of people with a history of ...

Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it's in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to document how facial bones change as black adults ...

Fifty-six of America's 500 biggest cities have major gaps in life expectancy between neighborhoods, a new study reveals.

These gaps can mean people in one neighborhood live 20 to 30 years longer than those just a mile away -- and the inequalities are prevalent in cities with high levels of racial and ethnic segregation, according to New York University researchers. They said their fin...

Expanding Medicaid coverage after the Affordable Care Act seems to have narrowed U.S. racial differences in cancer treatment, a new study suggests.

Before the Affordable Care Act, blacks diagnosed with advanced cancer were 4.8 percentage points less likely than whites to get treatment within the month after diagnosis, the researchers said.

States that expanded Medicaid in 20...

There's been a steep uptick in aggressive uterine cancers among American women, especially black women, since 2000, a new study shows.

It also found that black women with these aggressive cancers have lower survival rates than other women.

Researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) analyzed data on uterine cancer among 30- to 79-year-olds. They found that cases ...

Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

That meets the U.S. Department of ...

"Watchful waiting" is on the rise overall among U.S. men with low-risk prostate cancer, but black men remain less likely to opt for it, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined 2010-2015 data on more than 50,000 low-risk prostate cancer patients in the United States. The investigators found that black men were 16% less likely than other men to decide on watchful wai...

Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease that attacks the skin, joints and organs, can shorten the lives of its victims, but new research shows it can shorten the lives of black patients the most.

Health data from two counties in Georgia found that black people with lupus have an average age at death of about 52. Meanwhile, white people with the disease live an average of around 65 years.<...

When it comes to opioid addiction treatments, money and race matter, researchers say.

White, wealthy Americans are much more likely to receive medication for their addiction than minorities and the poor, the new study found.

Racial and financial differences have only grown wider as the opioid crisis in the United States has worsened, even though opioid addiction rates are s...

Too many women still die from pregnancy-related causes, some up to a year after delivery, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About 700 pregnancy-related deaths occur in the United States each year, and 3 out of 5 are preventable, data show.

Nearly 31% of the deaths happen during pregnancy, and another 36% occur during deli...

Most people are terrified of having a heart attack, but they might also need to worry about heart failure, particularly if they are black.

After years of decline and despite treatment advances, the risk of dying early from heart failure-related causes started increasing after 2012, new research shows. Black men seem especially hard hit by this troubling new trend, the study authors n...