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Results for search "Child Development".

01 Jun

Why Do Male Infants ‘Talk’ More During the First Year of Life?

A new study finds male infants make more vowel- and word-like sounds during the first year of life, but then lose that early advantage.

Health News Results - 580

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2024 (Health Day News) -- Schools that want little girls to get plenty of exercise might want to rethink their dress code.

A University of Cambridge study of more than 1 million kids in 135 countries found that in countries where most students wear school uniforms, fewer kids get the 60 minutes a day of physical activity recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO...

School districts could be severely underestimating how many kids are homeless in their communities, allowing those children to fall through the cracks, a new study warns.

Schools around the United States report that more than 1.2 million students are homeless every year.

But the information gathered by the districts isn’t enough to accurately track homelessness, researchers argue....

Babies born even slightly early have a higher long-term risk of developmental difficulties that could affect their behavior and learning ability, a new study finds.

Infants born moderately (32-33 weeks) or late preterm (34-36 weeks) are more likely to have epilepsy or problems with brain function, motor skills, vision or hearing, according to analysis of data from more than 1 million Swed...

Kindergarten might seem like child's play, but embracing the adventure can play a key role in a kid's future educational success, a new study finds.

A successful early transition to kindergarten -- what the researchers called the “big little leap” -- can put a child firmly on the right path, researchers found.

Kids who made a more successful transition in the first 10 to 14 week...

Expecting moms who often turn to acetaminophen for their aches and pains are more likely to wind up with kids who have behavioral issues, a new study warns.

Children between the ages of 2 and 4 were more likely to have attention and behavioral problems if their mothers frequently used acetaminophen during pregnancy, researchers found.

“The kinds of behaviors the caregivers reporte...

Exposing babies and toddlers to TV and other digital media could be linked to a heightened risk for dysfunction in what's known as "sensory processing," a new study warns.

Kids with "atypical sensory processing" are often hypersensitive to the touch, sound, taste or look of stimuli in their environment.

For example, kids might try to avoid the feel of certain clothing, the taste of...

Ear infections are common for kids, but they can lead to long-term developmental problems, a new study finds.

Temporary hearing loss caused by recurring ear infections can lead to delays in language development and sound processing years later, researchers reported recently in the Internationa...

Paxlovid might help shorten and diminish a COVID infection, but the antiviral doesn't reduce the risk of developing long COVID, a new study shows.

About 16% of COVID patients treated with Paxlovid wound up with long COVID symptoms, compared to 14% of those not given the oral medication, researchers found.

“Our finding that Paxlovid treatment during acute infection is not associate...

Acetaminophen, best known as Tylenol in the United States, is a go-to pain med for millions.

However, a new study is raising doubts about its safe use by women who are pregnant.

The researchers found kids born to women who used acetaminophen while pregnant had delays in language development, compared to children born to women who didn't use the drug.

This isn't the first tim...

The fluid-filled spaces around the brain's blood vessels need proper waste "clearance" every few hours. When that fails to happen, a baby's risk for autism appears to rise, new research shows.

It's too early to say that trouble within these "perivascular" spaces causes autism, but it seems to be an early marker for the condition, a team from the University of North Carolina (UNC) reports....

Doctors report they are seeing what they think is a new syndrome in babies who are exposed to fentanyl while in the womb.

All of the infants have cleft palates and unusually small heads, and all were born to mothers who said they'd used fentanyl and other drugs while pregnant.

Six babies were first` identified at Nemours Children's Health in Wilmington, Del., two in California and o...

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2023 (Healthday News) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it plans to require the removal of all lead pipes from the country's water systems.

The proposed rule, an ambitious effort that will cost up to $30 billion over the next decade, would affect about 9 million pipes that send water to homes in countless communities across the United S...

University of Louisville researchers say they've developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system with a near-perfect record of diagnosing autism in toddlers.

Using specialized MRI scans of the brain, the tool diagnosed toddlers with 98.5% accuracy, according to findings scheduled for presentation in Chicago next week at a meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2023 (Healthday News) -- Expert advice and self-help books are officially passé: Social media is where nearly all new parents now go for guidance on potty training, sleep issues and toddler tantrums, a new poll shows.

Four in five turn to forums like TikTok and Facebook for tips on caring for young children, while nearly half rate social media as very useful for finding ...

Air pollution could be harming the development of children, reaching into the womb to alter their healthy growth, a new study reports.

Researchers say certain air pollutants appear to negatively alter a specific measure of prenatal exposure to hormones.

“These findings suggest air pollution may interfere with normal hormone activity during critical periods of prenatal and early in...

An adolescent starts thinking like an adult right around the age of 18, according to new research.

That provides some of the first definitive evidence that executive function matures by that time.

Executive function is a set of mental skills that include the ability to plan, switch between tasks, resist tempting distractions and focus.

For

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 6, 2023
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  • Experts have long wondered whether diagnoses for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the youngest children in a class would hold.

    A new study suggests that being the youngest, and possibly most immature, did not appear to make a difference.

    “We know the youngest children in their year group are more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD -- but many believe this is becaus...

    Severe inflammation very early in childhood might hamper the development of key brain cells, perhaps setting the stage for conditions such as autism or schizophrenia, new research suggests.

    The origins of many neurodevelopment disorders remain mysterious. But the new study of postmortem brain tissue from children who died between the ages 1 and 5 shows how inflammation affects brain cells...

    Young children who are close to their parents are more likely to grow up to be kind, caring and considerate. These kids may also have fewer mental health problems during early childhood and adolescence, a new study finds.

    By contrast, children whose early relationships with their parents are emotionally strained or abusive are less likely to become thoughtful and generous.

    “Taking...

    Not all children diagnosed with autism as toddlers continue to have that diagnosis once they reach elementary school, a new study shows.

    While some past research has suggested this could be true, the new research backs that up, finding that a large percentage -- about 37% -- of these toddlers no longer met the criteria for the condition by the age of 6.

    “I think what this shows is...

    As many as 1 in 4 teens with autism may be undiagnosed, new research suggests.

    “Autism is much more prevalent than people assume,” said lead researcher Walter Zahorodny, an associate professor at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark.

    The

  • Sarah D. Collins HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 6, 2023
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  • In yet another reminder of the psychic toll the pandemic has taken on young people, new research shows spending on mental health services for U.S. children and adolescents has risen sharply since 2020.

    It climbed 26% for youths aged 19 and younger between March 2020 and August 2022, the RAND Corp. study found. Among a large group whose families had employer-provided insurance, use of ment...

    Exposure to ubiquitous chemicals known as PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, may delay puberty in girls, new research indicates.

    The study is the first to consider the role hormones play in the delay, according to researchers from the University of Cincinnati.

    Delayed puberty can lead to negative long-term health outcomes for girls, such as a higher incidence of breast ca...

    What a baby eats, or how the baby eats, may have an impact on future weight and health, research has shown.

    A new study backs that up. It found that 9-year-olds who had been breast-fed for six months or more had a lower percentage of body fat than their peers who were ne...

    Most parents want to help their kids do well in school, and for dads the answer may be found in something simple and fun.

    A new study from the United Kingdom finds that kids do better in elementary school when their fathers regularly spend time interacting with them through reading, playing, telling stories, drawing or singing.

    Researchers at Leeds University Business School found t...

    Having safer neighborhoods, where families feel less stress, can help prevent child abuse, according to new research that supports this long-suspected theory.

    When parents feel higher levels of stress or hopelessness about their surroundings, they may have a harder time caring for their children,

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 25, 2023
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  • Advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will weigh the possibilities and parameters of experiments with artificial wombs for premature human babies.

    Scientists have already had some success with the concept in animals.

    During a two-day

    Low-carb diets may be all the rage, but they're not for kids with diabetes, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

    In a new report, the AAP says that low-carbohydrate diets cannot be recommended for children or teenagers with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. That's because there's little evidence they're helpful, but there are concerns about restricting kids' diets to tha...

    For parents worried about how Disney princesses might impact their child's self-image, a new study is saying, “Let it go.”

    “In children's media, about 60% of the characters are men and boys, they're male. And Disney princesses are probably one of the more visible and more well-known examples of media, made for children specifically, that's focused on female characters and women's st...

    Certain combinations of bacteria found in dust in children's day care settings may have an impact on their young lungs.

    Researchers are trying to understand whether attending day care can affect children's lung health. Their aim is to lower the risk of asthma.

    “We find mixtures of different bacteria and other microbes living everywhere — outside, inside our homes, on our skin a...

    So much for the powerful feminist messaging in the new Barbie movie.

    Director Greta Gerwig's feminist interpretation of Barbie depicted the fashion dolls as judges, surgeons, naval officers, astronauts and U.S. Presidents in Barbie World, and it resonated. The Barbie movie broke box office records this summer.

    But new research shows most people are not living in this re-imagined Bar...

    Just like adults, kids face daily stressors.

    Luckily, a new study suggests that teaching them creative thinking can help them manage it all.

    Researchers found that when school-age children learned some "narrative creativity" techniques -- such as shifting your perspective and imagining "what if" scenarios -- they quickly became better problem-solvers.

    After a week-long creativ...

    Just 1 in 4 children with autism is diagnosed before age 3, but a new eye-tracking technology may allow for earlier diagnosis and intervention, according to three clinical studies of more than 1,500 kids.

    Autism is a disorder marked by difficulties with communication and social interaction. In the United States, it affects about 1 child in 36, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Con...

    A stressful or traumatic childhood experience — anything from parents divorcing to a sibling's drug problem — may have long-term effects on a woman's sexual health.

    These adverse childhood experiences may be linked to sexual inactivity and dysfunction in women later in life, a

    Phthalates are commonly used in plastics, and researchers have now tied them to developmental issues in toddler boys who were exposed to the chemical in the womb.

    The new study links the chemicals to emotional and behavioral development issues in 2-year-old boys ...

    Lots of children and adolescents have the condition known as ADHD, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    What should parents know? A number of treatments exist to help with functioning, including medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Typically, ADHD begins between ages 3 and 6, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health. It can continu...

    Along with having to deal with the social stigma of having a parent who is incarcerated, young adults in that situation may be more likely to develop signs of heart trouble, a new study finds.

    The health impacts of having a parent who spent time in jail have been understudied, the researchers noted.

    "There was very little data on its association with cardiovascular risks,” said le...

    Infants born three to six weeks early -- considered late preterm -- are at risk for learning problems, but they can be overcome, researchers say.

    Preschool attendance and sensitive parenting can help them bridge the gap academically, a new study shows.

    "Our findings highlight an opportunity for pediatric providers to offer prevention strategies to parents of late preterm infants to...

    If your child is acting out and you're looking for solutions, researchers at the University of Georgia's Youth Development Institute suggest better sleep might be the answer.

    Getting more hours of slumber could reduce impulsive behavior in kids, their new study showed.

    “Stressful environments are shown to make adolescents seek immediate rewards rather than delayed rewards, but the...

    Young Black children living in racially segregated U.S. neighborhoods are at heightened risk of potentially brain-damaging lead exposure, a new study warns.

    The study, of nearly 321,000 North Carolina children under the age of 7, found that those living in predominantly Black neighborhoods had higher blood levels of lead than those living in more integrated areas.

    Experts said the f...

    If you are a new mom struggling with postpartum depression, taking antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may also bear benefits for your child's development.

    That's according to new research that found the medications were associated with improvements in a child's behavior up to five years after birth.

    Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, ...

    Tears may flow when parents drop their teen off at college. Watching kids leave the nest can tug at the heart and make parents a little anxious about what's to come.

    That makes sense, but it's natural that young adults will become more independent and develop autonomy from their parents and grandparents. So, how can parents rise to the occasion?

    An expert from Virginia Tech offers s...

    Children need to get up off the sofa and move more, according to a new study that linked childhood sitting time with heart damage in young adulthood.

    That was true even when the adult's blood pressure and weight were healthy, according to researchers.

    “All those hours of screen time in young people add up to a heavier heart, which we know from studies in adults raises the likelih...

    Eye tests are an important way to catch potential eye-related issues in children, but more than two-thirds of kids in the United States are not receiving them at their checkups.

    Those with Medicaid and other public health insurance were far less likely to receive these vision checks in the past year at their primary care doctor's office, according to researchers at University of Michigan ...

    Too much screen time can lead to developmental delays in babies, researchers say.

    When 1-year-olds viewed screens for more than four hours a day, they had delays in communication and problem-solving skills when assessed at ages 2 and 4, according to a new study published Aug. 21 in

    When U.S. parents express their concerns about their school-aged children, social media use and the internet are at the top of the list.

    Mental health issues are another top worry, according to the University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

    “Parents still view problems di...

    Helping a child who struggles with reading can be a rewarding experience.

    A nationally known expert offers some tips for parents who are trying to help their child work through these difficulties.

    Patricia Edwards, professor of language and literacy at Michigan State University's College of Education, s...

    Childhood obesity is concerning for many reasons, among them that the severity of the sleep disorder known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) grows with obesity levels and age.

    A new study looked at the role of obesity in children's OSA. It adds to a growing awareness of the part ob...

    Buying back-to-school shoes should be more about the right fit than the right look — but with luck you can combine the two.

    Shoes play a big part in how kids' feet function and should be selected with care, say orthopedists at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York.

    “When parents bring their children in with foot pain or an injury, the first thing I do is ask about ...

    In the midst of a childhood obesity epidemic, a new study is pointing to a way to help school kids maintain a healthier weight: clean, accessible drinking water.

    The decidedly low-tech solution emerged in a study of 18 California elementary schools that serve largely low-income minority families. Researchers found that when they kicked off a "Water First" program -- which included putting...

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