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Results for search "Behavior".

15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

Health News Results - 424

Here's yet another reason to limit screen time and get moving: Boosting your activity levels could reduce your risk of sleep apnea, according to a new study.

Compared to the most active people in the study, those who spent more than four hours a day sitting watching TV had a 78% higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and those with sedentary jobs had a 49% higher risk.

And th...

Coffee delivers the boost that many people need to start their day. Now, new research suggests this breakfast powerhouse may also provide some protection against COVID-19.

Consuming vegetables and having been breastfed might also reduce your COVID-19 risk, according to the new study from Northwestern University in Chicago. Conversely, processed meats may increase your susceptibility to th...

Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination — advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll revea...

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- An active mind in old age may delay Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a new study suggests.

Activities like reading, writing letters, playing cards or doing puzzles may prolong brain health even for those in their 80s, researchers say.

"The key element is that you're processing information," said lead researcher R...

WEDNESDAY, July 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for...

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality — and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological basis for human spirituality.

"It is something of a treacherous subject to navigate," said lead researcher Michael F...

WEDNESDAY, July 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Is it possible to become addicted to gaming on the internet?

Yes, warns new research that discovered when young people get too hooked it may trigger sleep difficulties, depression, anxiety and, in some cases, even suicidal thoughts.

Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and ...

Lotteries that pay cash and prizes to Americans who get vaccinated sound like a sure-fire recipe for success, but a new study finds they don't actually boost vaccination rates.

After media reports suggested that Ohio's "Vax-a-Million" lottery increased vaccination rates, other states decided to use lotteries to reinvigorate slowing vaccination rates.

"However, prior evaluations of t...

Want to hold a preschooler's interest in learning something new? Give them just enough information to make them want to know more, a new study suggests.

This creates the perfect mix of uncertainty and curiosity in children, said researchers from Rutgers University, in New Jersey.

"There is an infinite amount of information in the real world," said lead study author Jenn...

Behaviors associated with eating disorders can make real changes to the brain, new research shows. The findings could help explain why these serious disorders are often chronic -- and may also point the way to new treatments.

Eating disorders — such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder — can result in severe complications, including death. Related behaviors include ...

WEDNESDAY, June 30, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Is spanking good for parents? Is spanking good for kids? Is spanking good for anyone? No, no and no, according to a big new review of prior research.

"Zero studies found that physical punishment predicted better child behavior over time," said study co-author Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sc...

WEDNESDAY, June 30, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Planning to celebrate the Fourth of July with a traditional Southern-style spread of fried chicken, pork rinds, buttermilk biscuits and sweet tea?

Don't make it an everyday habit.

These staples of a regional diet heavy in fried foods, fats and sugary drinks may boost your odds for sudden cardiac death, a new study warn...

Dog obedience trainer Cindy Leung has a very anxious client who loves a very anxious breed, the Shetland Sheepdog.

"My [human] student startles at loud noises," Leung said. "That's just part of her personality. Loud, sudden noises startle her. Something weird that shows up in the environment startles her. She's got a really strong startle reflex, and her dogs have a strong startle reflex,...

U.S. high school seniors say marijuana was significantly harder to come by during the pandemic -- yet their use of the drug continued at rates similar to those before school closures began, a new study finds.

Their binge-drinking also continued at similar rates, according to the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

"Last year brought dramatic changes to adolescents' lives, ...

COVID-19 patients with mental confusion are at increased risk for a severe form of the illness, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed the electronic health records of more than 36,000 COVID-19 patients at five Florida hospitals. Of those, 12% developed severe COVID-19.

Patients with mental confusion were three times more likely to develop severe illness than those without such sym...

Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free -- and they're happy that way.

The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of parents or people who planned to have children.

On one h...

It might have seemed harmless to while away hours stuck at home during the pandemic with extra wine and cocktails. But new research instead points to a troubling trend: Alcohol use and risky drinking rose among Americans over the last year.

For the study, the researchers surveyed the same group of U.S. adults twice in 2020. The first poll was conducted in May and asked participants about...

A leading medical group is offering testing guidelines for children with autistic behaviors.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Environmental Health emphasized that certain measurements to test for exposure to chemicals are not helpful to guide treatment. The council pointed out that just because a chemical is found in the body doesn't mean it will cause harm.

The counc...

It's long been known the sun's rays can cause skin cancer.

But a new poll shows that only about 30% of American adults say they're concerned about developing skin cancer -- even though nearly 70% have at least one risk factor for the disease.

The American Academy of Dermatology's survey found that 49% of respondents were more worried about avoiding sunburn than preventing skin cance...

Your health and fitness apps may have privacy issues that put your personal information at risk, researchers warn.

"This analysis found serious problems with privacy and inconsistent privacy practices in mHealth [mobile health] apps. Clinicians should be aware of these and articulate them to patients when determining the benefits and risks," lead study author Muhammad Ikram and his co-aut...

When young adults are seeking a casual dating relationship, drinking is likely to follow, new research suggests.

Meanwhile, those who are already in a serious relationship are likely to drink less.

The study included more than 700 people in the Seattle area, aged 18 to 25, who filled out surveys every month for two years. The study used a community sample that was not limited to col...

What can make a young person vulnerable to eating disorders? Teasing them about any extra pounds they may carry, researchers say.

"Our findings add to the growing evidence that weight-based mistreatment is not helpful and is often harmful to the health of young people," said study leader Laura Hooper, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health, in Minneapolis.<...

The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

The old double standard lives on.

A new study finds that many people still believe -- incorrectly -- that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem. And they don't think the same is true of men.

"We were surprised that this stereotype was so widely held," said study first author Jaimie Arona Krems, an assistant professor of psychology at Oklahoma State University. "This st...

Suffering for fashion is nothing new. Researchers in the United Kingdom have unearthed new evidence that stylish pointed shoes caused a "plague" of bunions in the late medieval period.

Investigators from the University of Cambridge analyzed 177 skeletons from cemeteries in and around the city of Cambridge. Included were a charitable hospital, the grounds of a former Augustinian friary wh...

WEDNESDAY, June 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) - You've heard it often: Don't get behind the wheel of a car after a night of drinking. Now, a new study confirms that rideshare services like Uber and Lyft are making it easier for people to follow that advice and get home unharmed and alive.

Texas researchers saw a marked change in motor vehicle collision traumas from before Uber entered the Hou...

ADHD medications might help lessen the risk of suicide in children with serious behavioral issues, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that medications like Ritalin and Adderall, commonly prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), were linked to a lower risk of suicidal behavior among 9- and 10-year-olds with substantial "externalizing" symptoms.

That includ...

Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

"Spending hours on end on your phon...

Fewer temptations at checkout?

People may spend more money when they buy their groceries online, but they also tend to buy fewer unhealthy, "impulse-sensitive" foods like candy and cookies, new research shows.

For the study, the researchers looked at the shopping habits of 137 primary household shoppers in Maine to compare their in-store and online purchases. The shoppers had shopp...

Could getting out of bed just one hour earlier every day lower your risk for depression?

Yes, claims new research that found an earlier start to the day was tied to a 23% lower risk of developing the mood disorder.

The study of more than 840,000 people found a link "between earlier sleep patterns and reduced risk of major depressive disorder," said study author Iyas Daghlas.

T...

America, get ready for a baby boom.

That's the likelihood anyway, according to a new forecast that suggests a drop in pregnancy and birth rates seen during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic is about to be reversed.

"We expect a dramatic rebound soon," said study lead author Dr. Molly Stout. She is maternal fetal medicine director at Michigan Medicine Von Voigtlander Women's Ho...

COVID-19 lockdowns had at least one welcome upside: a significant drop in crime in cities worldwide, according to an international study.

Researchers analyzed crime data from 27 metro areas (including Chicago; London; Sao Paulo; Barcelona, Spain; Tel Aviv, Israel; and Brisbane, Australia) and found big declines in most types of crimes, with the notable exception of homicide.

"City l...

It's a scenario fraught with potential conflict: Moving back home as an adult can be tough - on both the grown children and their parents.

But it can also come with opportunities, as long as expectations are established early, say some "boomerang kids" who moved back in with mom and/or dad after reaching adulthood.

A new study interviewed 31 of those young adults, aged 22 to 31, who...

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

Adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder, a common mental health condition known as OCD, may have more than triple the risk of having a stroke, according to a new report from Taiwanese researchers.

As to why, the study authors aren't sure.

The investigators speculate that other mental health problems suffered by OCD patients - "comorbidities" such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorde...

Angry outbursts at the office, threats made in everyday interactions: New research using data from hundreds of studies suggests folks who act out in this way often have narcissistic traits.

They don't even have to rate high in narcissism to be prone to aggressive behavior, the research team found.

"Those who are high in narcissism have thin skins, and they will lash out if they feel...

A ban on flavored vaping products in San Francisco may have increased high school students' use of conventional cigarettes, according to a new study.

In 2018, voters in the city overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure banning the sale of flavored tobacco products.

An analysis of 2011-2019 data on high school students younger than 18 found that before the ban was implemented, past 3...

WEDNESDAY, May 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - Teenage girls who use over-the-counter diet pills and laxatives to lose weight run a very high risk of developing eating disorders, researchers say.

In a new U.S. study, girls who used diet pills had a 258% greater risk of being diagnosed with an eating disorder like anorexia or bulimia within five years. If they used laxatives, the risk was 17...

TUESDAY, May 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) - Country by country, the percentage of people willing to mask up in a during the pandemic has varied greatly. Now, researchers have identified one key mindset that helps explain why.

A culture's level of "collectivism" -- prioritizing the group's needs over an individual's -- influences whether someone is willing to wear a mask, researchers say.

...

Though obesity by itself can drive up heart disease risk, new research suggests diabetes and heart disease risk is especially high when combined with a tendency to stay up late at night.

The finding stems from a comparison of sleep patterns and disease in 172 middle-aged people as part of an ongoing obesity prevention study in Italy.

"The sleep-wake cycle is one of the most importan...

Many Americans felt relief and joy at the announcement last week that fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear masks at many indoor and outdoor locations.

But don't be surprised if those good feelings come tinged with stress or worry: Mental health experts said in a HealthDay Now interview that the COVID-19 pandemic has left a lasting mark on people's psyches, and folks will be stru...

When the COVID-19 pandemic kept young kids indoors, their time spent watching TV and other screens rose dramatically.

That's the finding of a new study that investigated the screen time of kindergarteners from low-income families in Ohio. The researchers found that their use of television, video, movies, short clips, and apps or games on any electronic device topped six hours a day in May...

An estimated 9 million Americans turn to prescription pills when they can't sleep, but a new study of middle-aged women finds taking the drugs for a year or longer may do little good.

Comparing a group of about 200 women who were medicated for sleep problems with over 400 women who had sleeping problems but did not take medication, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston f...

Maintaining adequate social distance from strangers -- a key COVID-19 preventive measure -- can be tough when you're drinking alcohol, researchers say.

In a new study, the researchers put more than 200 young social drinkers in different social situations in laboratory settings. They drank either alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages.

In half of the cases, participants drank with a fri...

Could having heart disease risk factors in childhood sow the seeds of thinking declines in middle-age?

It looks like it might, new research claims.

"I think it was not so big of a surprise for us, but maybe for the scientific community who have been focusing mainly on the midlife risk factors and old-age cognition," said study co-author Suvi Rovio. She is senior researcher of cardio...

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

That growling dog may actually be terrified of you.

Fear and age-related pain are among the reasons why dogs are aggressive toward people, a new study suggests.

The findings could help two-legged folks better understand and prevent aggressive behavior, such as growling, barking, snapping and biting, according to Finnish researchers.

"Dogs' fearfulness had a strong link to aggr...

The weight-loss drug Saxenda can keep extra pounds off -- but combining it with exercise brings a bigger payoff, a new clinical trial finds.

The study found that some longstanding advice is valid: Prescription weight-loss drugs work best when used along with -- and not in place of -- lifestyle changes.

Saxenda (liraglutide) is a prescription drug approved in the United States for sp...

Adults with autism report a broad range of sexuality -- being much more likely to identify as asexual, bisexual or homosexual than people without autism, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 2,400 adults, researchers found that those with autism were three to nine times more likely to identify as homosexual, asexual or "other."

Among men, those with autism were over three times ...

You might think everybody knows how to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays, but a new survey reveals that one-third of Americans lack a basic understanding of sun safety and skin cancer.

That's the surprising takeaway from an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey of 1,000 U.S. adults.

Fifty-three percent of respondents didn't realize shade offers protection from t...

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