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Winter months can be a challenge for those trying to keep their high blood pressure in check, new research suggests.

In an analysis of more than 60,000 American adults being treated for high blood pressure at six health care centers in the Southeast and Midwest United States, scientists found that systolic blood pressure -- the top number -- rose slightly in winter months, by up to 1.7 mm...

COVID-19 patients face a markedly greater risk for developing persistently high blood pressure, even if they never had blood pressure concerns before, new research indicates.

The rise in risk seen among otherwise heart-healthy patients also appeared to be notably greater among COVID patients than in influenza patients.

The findings, said senior study author

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 21, 2023
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  • Every day, millions of people must take one or more pills to control their blood pressure and reduce their risk for heart attack or stroke, but if new research pans out, some may be able to scrap their pills for a twice-yearly shot with the same benefits.

    Given as a shot every six months, zilebesiran suppresses the gene that produces a hormone called angiotensin that causes blood vessels ...

    Patients could find lifesaving benefits in using a home blood pressure cuff.

    New research finds that home blood pressure monitoring saves lives and cuts costs. It also reduces health care disparities in racial and ethnic minorities and rural residents.

    Furthermore, regular self-testing better controls high blood pressure, especially in underserved patients, reducing the risk o...

    Loneliness might be a true heartbreaker for people with diabetes — raising their odds of a heart attack even more than unhealthy lifestyle habits do.

    That's according to a new study of over 18,000 adults with the blood sugar disease. Researchers found that people who reported feeling lonely were up to 26% more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke in the next decade, compared to tho...

    You could have high blood pressure and not realize it. The only way to know for sure is to have your blood pressure tested.

    It's an important step, according to the American Heart Association (AHA), and so is understanding your results so you can keep your blood pressure under control.

    A diagnosis of high blood pressure -- and any unusually low blood pressure readings - must be mad...

    Many men will put off going to the doctor unless they are really sick, but men's health screenings help catch problems before symptoms appear.

    So, how can you tell if a health screening or preventive care appointment is right for you?

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the

    Dangerously low blood pressure is considered an “invisible” consequence of paralysis, adding to the woes of as many as 9 out of 10 people with spinal cord injuries.

    Now, a new implant has been developed that treats the problem by delivering electrical stimulation to a select group of spinal neurons.

    The device, called a neuroprosthetic baroflex, stimulates the lower part of the ...

    That road noise outside your window could be wreaking havoc on your blood pressure.

    A new study published March 22 in JACC: Advances found that the roaring engines, blaring horns and wailing sirens can themselves elevate high blood pressure (hypertension) risk, aside from questions about the impact of air pollution.

    “We were a little surprised that the association between...

    Plenty of people enjoy a cup or two, or maybe three or four, of coffee every day.

    But new research shows that people with severe high blood pressure ("hypertension") should steer clear of drinking too much java.

    The study found that for those with blood pressure of 160/100 or higher, drinking two or more cups of coffee daily was associated with a doubled risk of death from heart di...

    Adding a little yoga to an exercise routine can be the fix someone needs to drop high blood pressure, a small study suggests.

    “As observed in several studies, we recommend that patients try to find exercise and stress relief for the management of hypertension [high blood pressure] and cardiovascular disease in whatever form they find most appealing,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 8, 2022
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  • Mindfulness is a centuries-old practice that's become trendy in recent years -- and a new study now says it can help your heart health.

    Training in mindfulness can help people better manage their high blood pressure by helping them stick to healthy lifestyle changes, a new clinical trial reports.

    An eight-week customized mindfulness program helped people lower their systolic blood p...

    Some patients with high blood pressure can't get it under control with standard medications, but a new study shows an experimental drug is up to the task of treating these tough-to-treat cases.

    Why do some folks struggle more with managing their high blood pressure than others? When the hypertension i...

    Although blood pressure levels among Americans rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests things could have been far worse.

    "We expected blood pressure control to be worse due to decreased physical activity, stress, poor sleep and other cardiovascular disease risk factors that worsened during the pandemic," said study leader

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2022
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  • Controlling high blood pressure in older adults may be one of the "best bets" for reducing the risk of developing dementia, Australian researchers report.

    "Given population aging and the substantial costs of caring for people with dementia, even a small reduction could have considerable global impact,...

    Regular home monitoring can help with blood pressure control, but only half of people who have hypertension or other related conditions actually do it, a new study found.

    Of Americans ages 50 to 80 who take blood pressure me...

    When it comes to why U.S. heart patients wind up in the emergency room, uncontrolled high blood pressure (or "hypertension") fuels about one-third of those medical crises.

    “These visits resulted in hospital admission less than 3% of the time and with very few deaths — less than 0.1%. This suggests...

    It doesn't seem to matter what time of day or night you take your blood pressure medication, a new study finds.

    The results of a randomized trial of more than 21,000 patients with high blood pressure who were follo...

    When it comes to taking your blood pressure at home, smart devices with lots of bells and whistles are no better than old-school monitors, which happen to cost much less.

    This is the main finding of a new study that compared high-tech devices that link to your smartph...

    Women who are their own bosses might have healthier hearts to show for it, a new study suggests.

    The study, of more than 4,600 working U.S. women, found that those who were self-employed typically got more exercise and were less likely to be obese or have

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure — and that alone more than doubles their odds of being hospitalized if they are infected with the Omicron variant of the coronavirus, a new study revealed.

    This was true even in people who were fully vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19, according to researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los ...

    Next time you work out, maybe take a 15-minute sauna when you're done for extra heart health benefits.

    That's the main finding of research out of Finland. It found taking a sauna confers additional cardiovascular benefits over exercise alone.

    The new study didn't look at how saunas can boost heart health, but other studies have elucidated these benefits. It has been shown "that some...

    Called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the environment, new research suggests that middle-aged women with high levels of perfluoroalkyls and polyfluoroalkyls (PFAS) in their blood may be more vulnerable to high blood pressure.

    In the study, women aged 45 to 56 who had the highest concentrat...

    Rates of dangerous high blood pressure problems during pregnancy more than doubled in the United States between 2007 and 2019, a new study finds.

    "The increase in pregnancy complications is alarming because these adverse pregnancy outcomes - including hypertension [high blood pressure] in pregnancy, preterm birth and a low birth weight infant - not only adversely influence both mom and ch...

    "Fill your plate up with colorful fruits and veggies for heart health."

    Such customized reminder texts may help folks who have had one heart attack avoid a second one, according to a new study out of Australia.

    "Texts provi...

    High blood pressure complications during pregnancy can be scary, but a new study warns they also significantly raise a woman's risk for heart disease later in life.

    "Women with a history of gestational hypertension or

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 10, 2022
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  • When women go into pregnancy with mild high blood pressure, treating the condition can cut the risk of health threats to themselves and their babies, a new clinical trial has shown.

    Experts said the findings could change the way many women have their blood pressure managed during pregnancy.

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in America, accounting for more than one in five deaths. Still, far too few women realize the danger.

    In fact, "Awareness of heart disease as the leading cause of death among women actu...

    The often-used steroid spironolactone is not linked to any increased risk of a range of common cancers, according to a new study.

    The synthetic steroid is routinely used to manage heart failure, high blood pressure and edema, and also used off-label to treat acne, hair loss and excessive hair growth (hirsutism).

    "Though the

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  • March 10, 2022
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  • Regular blood pressure readings at home are more accurate for diagnosing high blood pressure than those taken at a doctor's office, according to a new study.

    "Blood pressure varies a lot over the day and one or two measurements in clinic may not reflect your average blood pressure," said study author Dr. Beverly Green, a senior investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Researc...

    A new study offers more evidence that oral health is connected to heart health: Older women who harbor certain bacteria in their mouths might be at increased risk of developing high blood pressure.

    The study, which followed 1,200 women for a decade, found that 15 types of mouth bacteria were linked to the odds of developing

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  • March 2, 2022
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  • Pancreatic cancer is notoriously difficult to treat and beat, but new research suggests that commonly prescribed high blood pressure drugs may boost survival in patients.

    Known as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin receptor blockers (

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Once they're pregnant, women have a lot of checkups to make sure they stay healthy. But a mom's health preconception is vitally important, too, and a growing cause for concern.

    Increasingly, moms in the United States are starting their pregnancies already having heart risks like high blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes and obesity.

    A new study finds that 60% -- even higher in so...

    Giving dark chocolate to your sweetheart on Valentine's Day may be a win-win emotionally and physically, an expert suggests.

    But it's important to keep any potential health benefits in perspective, noted Lizzy Davis, an assistant professor of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    "What is healthy for one person may not be healthy for another," she said in a ...

    Almost everyone has had a dizzy spell after standing up too quickly, but some people suffer them regularly. Now, a new study suggests two do-it-yourself ways to help.

    The study focused on what's called initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH), where a person's blood pressure drops sharply within...

    Mobile health apps can help older Americans but only about four in 10 use them, and those most likely to benefit are least likely to take advantage of them, a new survey reveals.

    Health apps monitor everything from calories and exercise to blood pressure and blood sugar to help users manage chronic conditions or achieve health goals.

    "Now that most older adults have at least one mob...

    February is American Heart Month - the perfect time to remind women of three things they need to know about heart disease.

    It's the leading cause of death among U.S. women, accounting for one in three deaths, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). While progress to reduce that rat...

    Acetaminophen may do wonders for a headache, but using it for long-term pain relief could prove risky for people with high blood pressure, a new clinical trial suggests.

    Over two weeks of use, the painkiller caused blood pressure to spike in people who already had elevated numbers, the researchers found. That was true whether they were on blood pressure medication or not.

    The findin...

    Instead of adding salt to their meals, older adults can use spices to give their food more zip and keep their blood pressure under control, new research suggests.

    "We were working specifically with a population of older adults to see if we could reduce the amount of salt in a product and then tailor it to their tastes," explained study leader Carolyn Ross. She is a professor of food scien...

    Middle-aged folks who had high blood pressure since they were young adults show brain changes that may increase their risk of future mental decline, a new study says.

    Previous research has found that high blood pressure affects the structure and function of the brain's blood vessels, resulting in damage to...

    Hospitalizations for dangerously high blood pressure more than doubled in the United States from 2002 to 2014, new research shows.

    This jump in hospitalizations for what's called a "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 1, 2022
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  • A simple blood test may help spot pregnant women who are at risk for developing preeclampsia -- dangerously high blood pressure during pregnancy -- before it becomes a threat to both mother and child.

    Marked by a sudden spike in blood pressure, protein in urine or other problems during pregnancy, preeclampsia occurs in about 1 in 25 pregnancies in the United States, according to the lates...

    The number of American women with chronic high blood pressure who are dying during and after pregnancy is up sharply, a new study warns.

    Of 155 million births in the United States between 1979 and 2018, more than 3,200 mothers died of high blood pressure-related causes-- a 15-fold rise over the period. The risk was particularly high among Black women, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 5, 2022
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  • Millions of people are at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and don't even know it, due to a hidden hormone problem in their bodies.

    As many as 1 in 10 people have a non-cancerous tumor on one or both of their adrenal glands that could cause the gland to produce excess amounts of the stress hormone cortisol.

    Up to now, doctors have thought that these tumors h...

    They take care of others, but many U.S. home health care workers say they're not in good shape themselves, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed self-reported data collected from nearly 3,000 home health care workers in 38 states between 2014 and 2018 and found that more than a quarter rated their general health as fair or poor, 1 in 5 reported poor mental health, and 14% reported poor ...

    Yet another pandemic-related health woe has come to the fore: rising blood pressure.

    Data covering almost half a million middle-aged Americans shows that about 27% saw their blood pressure go up significantly in 2020 after COVID-19 restrictions unfolded compared to the prior year. Women appeared to be particularly vulnerable.

    Still, "the blood pressure elevation was not limited to o...

    Nearly 1 in 5 people with hypertension may be unintentionally taking a drug for another condition that causes their blood pressure to climb even higher, a new study suggests.

    Left untreated or undertreated, high blood pressure will increase your risk for heart attack, stroke, kidney disease and vision problems by damaging blood vessels. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss, restricting ...

    Tight blood pressure control -- not too high and not too low -- during surgery for spinal cord injuries may improve patients' outcomes, a new study suggests.

    "Damage to neurons in spinal cord injuries leads to dysregulation of blood pressure, which in turn limits the supply of blood and oxygen to stressed spinal cord tissue, exacerbating spinal neuron death," said co-lead author Abel Torr...

    Despite a nationwide effort to control blood pressure, the number of seniors hospitalized for a sudden, sharp rise in blood pressure surged over the last two decades in the United States.

    The largest increase was among Black Americans, with the highest rates in the South, new research shows.

    The aim of the study was to "evaluate whether we have made any progress in the last 20 years...

    Working in an already dangerous environment, the blood pressure of firefighters jumps when they get an emergency call, new research shows.

    That could be risky for those who already have high blood pressure, experts say.

    "All emergency and first responders should be aware of their health," said senior author Deborah Feairheller, director of the clinical cardiac program at the Univer...

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