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Results for search "Urinary Tract Infections".

23 Jul

Women With Recurrent UTIs Fearful About Antibiotic Overuse, Study Finds

Women with recurrent UTIs say they're frustrated with doctors for not suggesting nonantibiotic treatments.

01 Mar

Many Women With UTIs Receive Wrong Antibiotics

Nearly half of women with urinary tract infections get inappropriate prescriptions, often for longer than necessary, researchers say.

Health News Results - 20

Former President Bill Clinton was released from a California hospital on Sunday after being treated for sepsis.

Clinton, 75, was admitted for care at the University of California Irvine Medical Center, in Orange, last Tuesday after developing sepsis triggered by a urological infection.

A spokesperson for Clinton shared a

  • Ernie Mundell and Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
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  • October 18, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • A spokesperson for former President Bill Clinton said late Saturday that the 75-year-old will be discharged from a California hospital on Sunday, CNN reported. Clinton was hospitalized at the University of California Irvine Medical Center, in Orange, earlier in the week after developing sepsis triggered by a urological infection.

    Speaking on Twitter on Saturday, spokesperson Ange...

    Former President Bill Clinton has been hospitalized after developing sepsis that was triggered by a urological infection.

    Sepsis occurs when the body has an extreme response to an infection, and it can be life-threatening. Infections that can trigger sepsis most often start in the lung, urinary tract, skin or gastrointestinal tract. Without timely treatment, sepsis can quickly lead to tis...

    Urinary tract infections: They're the bane of millions of women, and a new study finds that many sufferers are unhappy that diagnosis and treatments are still limited for this painful condition.

    One of the biggest concerns researchers found was that many women think frequent antibiotic use to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) might not be the best solution. The study also noted frustr...

    Women who try to hold their pee during the day might want to rethink that strategy.

    It's time to "get up and go," according to the Urology Care Foundation, which is encouraging women to be proactive about their urological health.

    That, of course, means get up and go to the bathroom if you need to. But the foundation also suggests a number of activities a woman can get up and go...

    Millions of Americans have at some point in their lives gotten a long course of antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection. But according to new recommendations from a major U.S. doctors' group, some of the most common bacterial infections can now be treated with shorter courses of the drugs.

    The advice, from the American College of Physicians (ACP), says that for several types of infec...

    Many women suffer through countless urinary tract infections (UTIs), but a new study in mice offers hope that a vaccine could one day bring their nightmares to an end.

    "Although several vaccines against UTIs have been investigated in clinical trials, they have so far had limited success," said senior study author Soman Abraham, a professor of pathology, immunology and molecular genetics &...

    If you've gone to the doctor for a urinary tract infection (UTI), chances are that you've been given the wrong antibiotic or a longer-than-necessary treatment plan.

    That's even more likely if you live in a rural area, researchers say.

    A new study of private insurance claims data found that 47% of women were prescribed antibiotics that were outside recommended guidelines and 76% were...

    Nearly 1 in 2 women over the age of 50 deal with the indignities of urinary incontinence, but experts say no one has to suffer in silence.

    Frequently considered an inevitable problem of aging, most women never even try to get treatment for the urinary leakage that they experience, said Dr. Christopher Hartman, chief of urology at Long Island Jewish Forest Hills in New York City.

    ...

    Most folks are familiar with the havoc that high pollen levels can wreak on their lungs, but new research suggests they can also exacerbate a painful pelvic condition in some people.

    "Our study provides evidence to suggest increased pollen counts may trigger symptom flares in people living with UCPPS [urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome]," said researcher Siobhan Sutcliffe, of Washingto...

    If you smoke, you significantly increase your odds of developing bladder cancer, experts warn.

    "Everyone knows smoking causes lung cancer, but they don't always know about bladder cancer," said Dr. Srinivas Vourganti, a urologist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago who specializes in treating bladder and other urinary tract cancers.

    Smoking causes more than half of all case...

    How does having multiple sclerosis (MS) affect a person's odds for cancer? The answer may depend on the type of cancer, new research shows.

    The study found that MS patients do have much greater odds of developing bladder cancer compared to people without the illness. But there was good news, too: Their risk of breast and colon cancer is no higher than for people who don't have MS, accordi...

    THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2020 (HealthDay) -- Vitamin D, fish oil supplements and weight training have long been touted for their health benefits, but for healthy seniors, none of them -- either in combination or alone -- boosts physical or mental performance or prevents broken bones, Swiss researchers report.

    For three years, they tracked more than 2,100 men and women (average age: 74) who were...

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) might be able to break the cycle of recurring urinary tract infections in some women, a new study reports.

    Women taking HRT for symptoms of menopause tend to have a greater variety of bacteria in their urine, including larger amounts of the healthy Lactobacillus-type bacteria known to protect against urinary tract infections (UTIs), researchers...

    Many older women struggle with urinary tract infections, and researchers now think they know why.

    A big reason is because their bladder walls can be invaded by several species of bacteria, a recent study found.

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common type of bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. UTI recurrence rate...

    For the sick or elderly, a urinary tract infection (UTI) can prove deadly. With many vulnerable patients developing UTIs post-discharge, a new study suggests that better monitoring is needed after leaving the hospital.

    Researchers at Oregon State University explored more than 3,000 at-risk patients. The study revealed that the risk of infection tripled once patients went home.

    ...

    A urinary tract infection might be more than just a painful nuisance for some, with new research suggesting it could raise the risk of stroke in vulnerable people.

    The study of over 190,000 stroke patients found that the risk of suffering a stroke was heightened in the weeks and months following any infection that required a trip to the hospital. But urinary tract infections (UTIs) sh...

    Adults aren't the only ones susceptible to urinary tract infections, or UTIs. They can occur in kids, even infants, if bacteria get into the urinary tract, often from the bowel.

    Any child can get a UTI. But some kids are more prone than others, and girls get them more often than boys.

    A UTI doesn't always cause symptoms, and a very young child can't voice his or her discomfo...

    For women who need relief from bladder control problems, behavioral therapies are a better bet than medication, a new research review finds.

    In an analysis of 84 clinical trials, researchers found that overall, women were better off with behavioral approaches to easing urinary incontinence than relying on medication.

    Study patients were over five times more likely to see the...

    For older adults with a urinary tract infection (UTI), antibiotic treatment should begin immediately to prevent serious complications, a new British study finds.

    Delaying or withholding antibiotics in this age group can increase the risk of bloodstream infection (sepsis) and death, researchers reported Feb. 27 in the BMJ.

    The findings suggest that doctors should "cons...

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