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Results for search "Heat- / Sunstroke".

Health News Results - 57

Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

Warm summer nights may leave you tossing and turning in bed, but that could be the least of your worries. Just a slight rise in summer nighttime temperatures increases the risk of heart-related death for men in their 60s, a new study shows.

"Considering the growing likelihood of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • An increase in heat waves driven by climate change is causing hundreds more heart disease deaths in the United States each year, with men and Black people at particular risk, researchers say.

    Each year, the United States now has about three times as many heat waves as in the 1960s. Heat can put increased strain on the heart and trigger heart attacks and other cardiac problems.

    "Thes...

    A spike in hospitalizations for a dangerous low-salt condition is the latest in a growing list of health threats linked to climate change.

    An average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit could lead to a 14% increase in hospitalizations for critically low sodium levels in the blood, a condition called hyponatremia, according to a

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  • March 14, 2022
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  • Extreme heat from climate change is making it harder for people with mental illness and drug addiction to cope and adding to pressure on pandemic-stretched U.S. emergency rooms.

    During these severe summer temperature spikes, Americans with depression, anxiety, mood disorders and drug addiction are increasingly flocking to hospital ERs for help, a

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Devastating wildfires around the world will only grow in number in coming decades as climate change further fuels the chances of out-of-control blazes, a landmark report from the United Nations warns.

    “The heating of the planet is turning landscapes into tinderboxes,” said the

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  • February 23, 2022
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  • In yet another sign that climate change strikes the poorest without mercy, a new study shows that low-income people have a 40% higher exposure to heat than those with higher incomes.

    By the end of the century, heat wave exposure for the poorest 25% people worldwide will equal the rest of the global population combined. That's after ...

    Wildfires and rising temperatures are exposing more and more Americans to an air pollution double-whammy of smoke and smog, a new study warns.

    Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of people in western states have been simultaneously exposed to high levels of two kinds of air pollution: Fine-particle pollution generated by

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...

    Summer can sizzle in the city, but a new report finds urban living is getting hotter than ever before.

    The research shows that city dwellers may be suffering from what scientists call an urban ...

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

    Extreme heat brings a jump in emergency room visits by adults of all ages, a new study shows.

    While it's well known that extreme heat puts adults aged 65 and older at increased risk of hospitalization and death, it's been less clear how it affects young and middle-aged adults.

    To find out, the researchers analyzed the associations between heat and ER visits among more than 74 millio...

    Global warming may pose a threat to your kidneys, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from hospitals in more than 1,800 cities in Brazil between 2000 and 2015, and found that just over 7% of all admissions for kidney disease could be attributed to hotter temperatures.

    That equates to more than 202,000 cases of kidney disease, according to the report publi...

    Climate change is already making Americans sick and researchers warn that the nation must take swift action to protect people's well-being.

    "Climate change effects aren't just an abstraction, something that will happen years from now. They are happening today, and they impact every aspect of your health, from the air you breathe [more smoke, more pollen] to the nutritional quality of the ...

    You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

    In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

    As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

    Urban dwellers around the globe are sweating through three times as many "extreme heat" days as their counterparts did in the 1980s, a new study suggests.

    The study is the latest to chart humans' growing exposure to dangerously high temperatures. Experts said it looked at what's happening in finer detail than previous research has -- and it suggests that exposure to extreme heat is more w...

    Climate change is the "single biggest health threat facing humanity," and governments must "act with urgency" to tackle the crisis, a World Health Organization (WHO) special report warns.

    In advance of a United Nation's climate change summit in early November, groups representing 45 million nurses, doctors and health professionals worldwide signed an open letter urging action on the clima...

    It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

    "They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

    An editorial written jointly by the editors of more than 230 medical journals worldwide has a grim warning for humanity: Climate change is making people sick -- and it's going to get worse.

    As reported by CNN, the same global warming that's causing extreme weather events has had a number of negative impacts on human health during the past two decades, the journal editors said. A...

    Hotter weather driven by climate change is bad news for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study warns.

    Researchers say warming trends could worsen COPD symptoms, such as shortness of breath, wheezing or coughing. Millions of people have COPD, a combination of emphysema and chronic bronchitis that is often tied to smoking.

    "The climate emergency is prov...

    Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

    "Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

    Babies and seniors...

    This summer has brought dangerous, record-breaking heat to parts of the United States and Canada. The hot weather poses an extra challenge for pregnant women.

    Mothers-to-be need to stay cool to avoid heat exhaustion and its complications, according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston.

    "The summer is tough on pregnant women because the body struggles to cool down w...

    Extreme heat strikes poor and minority neighborhoods in U.S. cities harder than those that are wealthier and mainly white, a new study finds.

    "The distribution of excess urban heat varies within cities, and as a result, communities do not share a city's extreme heat burden equally," said study co-author Jennifer Burney. She's chair of global climate policy and research at the University o...

    Climate change has already become deadly enough to cause 5 million extra deaths worldwide each year, researchers report.

    "This is the first study to get a global overview of mortality due to non-optimal temperature conditions between 2000 and 2019, the hottest period since the pre-industrial era," said study co-leader Yuming Guo, a professor at Monash University in Australia.

    The fi...

    On sizzling hot summer days, it's important to guard against heat exhaustion and heat stroke, an expert says.

    "Heat stroke occurs when the core temperature of the body reaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and changes in our central nervous system take place, such as disorientation, confusion, behavioral or emotional changes or altered mental status," said Isabel Valdez, a physician assistant an...

    Could trees be the key to a cool summer in the city?

    Yes, claims new research that calculated just how much greenery can bring temperatures down.

    "We've long known that the shade of trees and buildings can provide cooling," said study co-author Jean-Michel Guldmann. He is a professor emeritus of city and regional planning at Ohio State University, in Columbus.

    "But now we can...

    Human-caused global warming is responsible for more than one-third of heat-related deaths worldwide, but the proportion is much higher in certain countries, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data gathered between 1991 and 2018 from 732 locations in 43 countries. They concluded that 37% of all heat-related deaths in recent summer periods were attributable to the warming of the planet...

    As you head into the great outdoors this summer, keep safety in mind, an expert says.

    Drowning is one of summer's risks. It only takes a few seconds and can happen without an obvious struggle, according to Dr. Seth Hawkins, a wilderness medicine expert and assistant professor of emergency medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, N.C.

    Adults must always closely superv...

    Rising temperatures caused by climate change could trigger a worldwide increase in stillbirths, researchers warn.

    The team at the University of Queensland in Australia analyzed 12 studies on the subject. They found that exposure to extremely high temperatures throughout pregnancy appeared to increase risk of stillbirth, particularly late in pregnancy.

    "Overall, risk of stillbirth ap...

    The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

    "Our results for a business-as-usual pathway indicate that, especially in the second half of this century, unprecedented super- an...

    Poor neighborhoods in the United States have fewer trees and are hotter than richer neighborhoods, new research shows.

    In the study, the researchers assessed tree cover in the 100 largest urban areas of the country.

    In nine out of 10 communities, there was less tree cover in low-income areas than in high-income areas. On average, low-income neighborhoods had about 15% less tree cove...

    Limiting global warming to targets proposed in the Paris Agreement could keep tropical regions from reaching temperatures that are beyond human tolerability, a new study projects.

    Researchers estimate that if countries are able to cap warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the tropics will be spared temperatures that surpass the "survival limit." But life in the worl...

    When temperatures rise, people with multiple sclerosis need to keep cool. Heat sensitivity is a hallmark of the central nervous system disorder.

    So, what happens when warm weather spikes become more frequent because of climate change?

    More MS patients end up in the emergency room. A new study found that during periods of unusually warm weather, they were more likely to visit the eme...

    Asphalt baking in the summer sunshine is no fun for tender feet, but a new study suggests it's not doing your lungs any favors either.

    As it heats up, asphalt releases chemical compounds that contribute to air pollution. And its emissions double as its temperature increases from 104 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit, researchers found.

    Sunlight plays a key role in these asphalt emis...

    Some of the leading hotspots in the United States are on track to become even more sweltering in the coming decades -- thanks to a combination of greenhouse gas emissions, urban development and population growth.

    In a new study, researchers estimate that over the course of this century, the biggest relative increases in extreme heat will hit cities in the Sunbelt -- including Atlanta;...

    With much of the United States blanketed by a heat wave this week, the American Red Cross offers some survival tips.

    Each year, extreme heat kills more than 600 people in the United States. And many others are at risk of heat-related illness, especially adults aged 65 and older and those with chronic medical conditions, the Red Cross noted in a news release.

    Electric fans ma...

    Heat is an underestimated killer in the United States, a new study suggests.

    According to researchers, death records indicate that heat kills as many as 600 hundred Americans each year, but moderate heat may actually be killing more than 5,000 annually. And the social distancing restrictions of COVID-19 might make staying cool harder this summer.

    Most of the deaths were from...

    Can working or playing in the hot sun "fry" your brain?

    Yes, claims a new, small study that found too much heat on the head hampered thinking in volunteers.

    Most people know that high temperatures can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke as the body's core temperature becomes dangerously high, but the beating sun can affect your brain even if your body temperature stays norm...

    Here's more bad news associated with climate change: Pregnant women exposed to air pollution or heat waves face a greater risk of having a preterm or underweight baby, a new research review finds.

    The review, of 68 studies from across the United States, found that the large majority arrived at the same conclusion: Babies were at greater risk when their mothers lived in areas with poor...

    As summer temperatures soar, dogs are at risk of potentially fatal heat-related illness -- and certain ones appear particularly vulnerable, a large new study confirms.

    The study, of more than 900,000 dogs, found that older pooches and those who carried extra pounds were at increased risk. The same was true of certain breeds -- often dogs with "flat" faces, such as bulldogs and pugs.

    Researchers have predicted that if climate change goes unabated, the planet will experience intolerable heat in several decades. But a new study has found that in certain global hot spots, it's already happening.

    In recent years, certain regions -- including the Persian Gulf, Indian subcontinent and some Mexican locales -- have recorded off-the-charts combinations of heat and humidity...

    Dangerously hot days for crop pickers in the United States will double over the next three decades because of climate change, a new study warns.

    "Studies of climate change and agriculture have traditionally focused on crop yield projections, especially staple crops like corn and wheat," lead author Michelle Tigchelaar, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University who conducted the...

    A wet T-shirt may cool seniors more effectively than an electric fan in hot, humid weather, reducing their risk of heat-related illness, according to a new study.

    It included adult volunteers, average age 68, who sat for two hours in a room with an air temperature of 108 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of 34%.

    Volunteers did three tests. In one, they wore a dr...

    Heart disease deaths spike with extreme heat, and rising temperatures due to climate change may lead to a surge in such deaths in hot regions, researchers say.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed 2010 to 2016 data on more than 15,000 heart-related deaths among people aged 15 and older in Kuwait, which has an average temperature of 82.2 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

    Compared ...

    As the days heat up, people tend to report more emotional distress, a new study finds, adding to concerns that global warming could take a growing mental health toll.

    The study of more than 3 million Americans found that the longer people had to sweat out 80-degree days, the bigger the mental health drain. They were more likely to report problems with depression, stress and emotional ...

    As the Earth continues to warm from climate change, an estimated 1.2 billion people will be affected by heat stress from extreme heat and humidity by 2100, a new study predicts.

    That is four times more people than are affected today and over 12 times more than would have been affected if climate change hadn't happened, researchers say.

    "When we look at the risks of a warme...

    If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

    Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

    The res...

    Climate change-caused increases in heat and humidity could put Muslims making the pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia in "extreme danger," a new study warns.

    This pilgrimage, known as the Hajj, involves several days of activities, including 20 to 30 hours outdoors.

    The timing of the Hajj varies. This year, it was Aug. 9 to 14, and next year it will be July 28 to Aug. 2, dur...