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Results for search "Cancer: Skin".

22 May

How to Protect Yourself from the Sun's UV Rays This Summer

Tips on how to reduce your risk of skin cancer, the most common cancer in the United States.

Health News Results - 53

With many beaches and parks opening in time for Memorial Day, the American Cancer Society is reminding people to practice sun safety.

Overexposing yourself to the sun increases your risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, with almost 5.5 million cases each year. That's more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.

"COVID-19 ...

The coronavirus pandemic has many people putting off medical appointments, but if you have possible cancer symptoms, don't delay.

A small lump in a breast, blood in your stool or an odd-looking mole, for example, should not be ignored, according to experts at Cedars-Sinai Health System in Los Angeles.

"We're seeing a concerning trend that some cancer diagnoses are being de...

Though most Americans are well aware that protecting themselves from sunburn is important, many don't take precautions, a new survey finds.

Protecting yourself from exposure to sunlight is the best way of preventing skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

The results of the AAD survey show that 76% of Americans know the importance of sun pr...

New treatments for melanoma have dramatically reduced deaths from this often fatal skin cancer.

Leaders of a new study report that the death rate from aggressive melanoma that spread to other organs plummeted 18% between 2013 and 2016, after jumping 7.5% between 1986 and 2013. The figures apply to white Americans, the group that accounts for nearly all cases of melanoma in th...

People whose spouse or partner has died are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma, but more likely to die from it, a new study says.

An analysis of data from population-based studies conducted in the United Kingdom and Denmark between 1997 and 2017 found that people who had lost a spouse or partner were 12% less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma than others.

But b...

Gay and bisexual men in the United States have higher skin cancer rates than heterosexual men, while bisexual women have lower rates than heterosexual women, according to a new study.

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston analyzed data culled from national surveys conducted from 2014 to 2018 and found that skin cancer rates were 8.1% among gay men, 8.4% among...

Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds.

"Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.

She and her colleagues from the University of Utah ...

The chemicals in sunscreens help shield people from the sun's rays, but they are also absorbed into the body at levels that raise some safety questions, a new study confirms.

The study, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a follow-up to a 2019 investigation. Both reached the same conclusion: The active ingredients in popular sunscreens can be absorbed into the blood at ...

A 29% drop in U.S. cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017 was driven by declines in deaths from four major cancers -- lung, colon, breast and prostate, according to the latest American Cancer Society (ACS) annual report.

Cancer deaths in the United States fell 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest-ever single-year decrease.

That record drop was spurred by a rapid decl...

Weight-loss surgery does more than shed pounds: new research suggests it might also lower your risk for skin cancer.

"This provides further evidence for a connection between obesity and malignant skin cancer, and for the view that we should regard obesity as a risk factor for these forms of cancer," said investigator Magdalena Taube. She's a researcher in molecular and clinical medici...

Widely condemned for driving up skin cancer risk, tanning beds remain common in that shrine to healthy living: gyms.

That's the finding from a study of tanning beds in three of America's six largest gym chains: Anytime Fitness, Planet Fitness and Gold's Gym.

Collectively, they operate more than 1,900 branches in the areas included in the study (33 states and Washington, D.C....

Using herbal products to treat breast cancer that's spread to the skin could slow wound healing and interfere with chemotherapy or hormone treatment, an expert warns.

Many patients try herbal products and creams to treat these skin lesions, according to Dr. Maria Joao Cardoso, head breast surgeon at Champalimaud Cancer Center in Lisbon, Portugal.

"There are many of these the...

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is recovering in a Georgia hospital after he broke his pelvis in a fall at his home on Monday night.

"He has been admitted to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture," said a statement issued early Tuesday by The Carter Center. "He is in good spirits and is looking forward to recovering at home."

<...

Melanoma is the most lethal type of skin cancer, and a new study finds that the diagnosis of a suspect lesion gains accuracy when a specialist pathologist is brought on board.

Many patients with melanoma are first diagnosed by general practitioners, dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A biopsy sample of the suspect lesion might then be sent to a general pathologist for further diagnos...

Cases of deadly melanomas on the head and neck rose more than 51% over two decades among young people in the United States and Canada, a new study reports.

Researchers found that the incidence of head and neck melanoma rose nearly 4% a year from 1995 to 2001, and 1.2% a year from 2001 to 2014 in children and young adults.

Using data from a North American cancer r...

Wondering if you can do more than slap on some sunscreen to prevent skin cancer? A new study suggests that getting more vitamin A may help.

The study of around 125,000 Americans found that people with the highest intake of vitamin A lowered their risk of squamous cell skin cancer by around 15%. Most of the vitamin A they consumed came from foods.

"These findings just ...

Don't invite skin cancer to your holiday weekend.

As you celebrate America's independence at beaches, pools or backyard parties, remember that the sun's damaging rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. -- and protecting yourself is a must.

"When it comes to sunscreen, people in general don't put on enough, and they don't put it on as often as they should," said Dr. William...

When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is normally invisible to the naked eye.

"T...

Monitoring a melanoma patient's progress is challenging. But a laser-based test might allow doctors to quickly screen the patient's blood to spot tumor cells roaming the body, a preliminary study suggests.

Those cells, known as circulating tumor cells, are "shed" from the original cancer site into the blood vessels or lymph system. They are considered a potential red flag. They could ...

Whether you're at the beach, the park or a pool this summer, be sure to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, and most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Fortunately, everyone can take action to protect their s...

Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

Researchers found that only about one-third of homemade sunscreens on the popular information-sharing website Pinterest specified how much sun protection factor (SPF) each "natural" sunblock contained. In some cases, SPF content dipped as low as 2 -- far bel...

For all of those men who view a mustache as a largely ornamental addition to their masculine appearance, a new study reveals it can also guard against lip cancer.

"Mustaches seem to protect the lip the same way that hair protects the scalp," explained study author Dr. Daniel Aires. He is director of dermatology with the University of Kansas Health System. ...

The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game.

"I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor.

Within days, Langill was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma -- an advanced stage of the mos...

Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found.

Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers.

One in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer a...

For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.

Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test subjects applied spray, lotion and cream...

Even though many moisturizers now contain sunscreens, people may not put them on their faces as carefully as they do sunscreen lotions, new research suggests.

"Moisturizer is not as well applied as sunscreen," said lead author Kevin Hamill, a lecturer in eye and vision science at the University of Liverpool in England.

"Therefore, if planning prolonged sun exposure, we advis...

Tens of millions of Americans develop sun-linked skin lesions called actinic keratoses, which are tied to later cancer risk.

Many will get a combo of treatments to help clear the blemishes.

Now, research shows that the same two-ointment combo -- one used to ward off skin cancer and the other a psoriasis drug -- also greatly reduce the odds for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs)...

A healthy diet may trigger a better response to a certain kind of melanoma treatment.

How?

New research suggests that a diet that's full of fiber appears to lead to more diverse intestinal bacteria (microbiome). In turn, a thriving gut microbiome is linked to a stronger response to an immune therapy for the aggressive skin cancer.

"We found that patients eating a ...

For people with the deadly skin cancer melanoma, one dose of the drug Keytruda before surgery might stop the cancer in its tracks, according to a groundbreaking new study.

Keytruda (pembrolizumab) is a PD-1 inhibitor, an immunotherapy drug that triggers the body's immune response to attack cancer cells. According to results of this study, the drug's effects peak as early as seven days...

Melanoma patients who are recent and current smokers have lower survival rates than nonsmokers, suggesting that smoking may weaken immune response to the most deadly skin cancer, researchers say.

In a study of more than 700 melanoma patients in the United Kingdom, smokers were 40 percent less likely to survive melanoma than people who hadn't smoked for at least 10 years before their ...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to tighten regulation of over-the-counter sunscreen products.

Included in the proposed rule are updates on sunscreen safety, sun protection factor (SPF) requirements, and the effectiveness of insect repellent/sunscreen combinations.

"The proposed rule that we issued today would update regulatory requirements for most ...

All expectant parents worry, and for those undergoing fertility treatments, there are additional concerns about the health of their child.

But a new study finds one less thing they need to stress over -- their children don't appear to be at greater risk of cancer than other children.

"These results provide reassuring evidence that children conceived as a result of fertility ...

A new mint-sized, battery-free patch that alerts wearers to potentially harmful sunlight exposure in real time might become a powerful weapon in preventing skin cancer.

Powered by the sun while designed to measure its rays, the patch automatically transmits sun readings to a user's smartphone. It works wet or dry, is fully reusable, and weighs next to nothing.

"In the U.S., ...

Melanoma skin cancer death rates in men are on the rise in most countries, but are stable or declining for women in some, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed World Health Organization data from 33 countries between 1985 and 2015. Melanoma death rates in men were increasing in all but one nation.

In all 33 countries, melanoma death rates were higher for men than fo...

It's a perfect case of the enemy of my enemy is my friend.

A potentially dangerous bacteria appears to target malignant cells and could provide a new means of fighting cancer, a small, preliminary study reports.

The bacteria, Clostridium novyi-NT, can cause gas gangrene and sepsis if infection is allowed to run amok in a wound.

Bu...

A combination of two drugs that work with the immune system can help beat back melanoma that has moved to the brain, an early clinical trial has found.

The study included 94 patients with advanced melanoma that had invaded the brain. All were treated with two "immunotherapy" drugs -- Opdivo (nivolumab) and Yervoy (ipilimumab) -- which help the immune system find and destroy tumors.

Poverty is a major reason black and Hispanic children with some types of cancer have lower survival rates than white patients, a new study finds.

Researchers examined U.S. government data on nearly 32,000 black, Hispanic and white children who were diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2011. For several cancers, whites were much more likely to survive than blacks and Hispanics.

...

People who have frequent recurrences of a common skin cancer may be at increased risk of a range of other cancers, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the heightened risk among patients who'd had many bouts of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) -- a highly treatable form of skin cancer diagnosed in over 3 million Americans each year.

Patients who'd developed at least six BCCs ov...

Don't kid yourself that using a sunless tanning product will prevent skin cancer.

Unless you're willing to stop sunbathing altogether, you're still at risk for skin damage, researchers report.

"For the most part, adults who use sunless tanning products continue to engage in risky tanning behaviors," said study leader Matthew Mansh, a dermatology resident at the University of...

Organ transplant recipients are at increased risk for skin cancer and need to protect themselves, a dermatologist warns.

"Individuals who receive organ transplants need to take immunosuppressive medications for the rest of their lives, and this makes it more difficult for their bodies to fight disease, including skin cancer," said Dr. Christina Lee Chung. She is former director of th...

Gym rats are trying to get healthy. So why do so many U.S. gyms have tanning beds, researchers want to know.

Since indoor tanning raises the risk of skin cancer, this common combo sends a conflicting message to gym users, University of Connecticut researchers say.

"By pairing exercise with tanning beds, gyms send the message that tanning is part of a healthy lifestyle. It is...

Karolina Jasko was a high school senior when a nail salon worker pointed out the black vertical line on her right thumbnail.

Because she typically painted her nails, the black line had gone unnoticed and unheeded, but then it started to show signs of infection.

At that point, Jasko sought out medical advice and got her diagnosis: a melanoma of the nail.

"My mom was...

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many people apply sunscreen too thinly, and that could mean far less sun protection than they hoped for, new research shows.

So, it might be a good idea to use sunscreens with a higher sun-protection factor (SPF) to begin with, the British researchers advised.

"What this research shows is that the way sunscreen is applied plays a...

Two years ago, Ian McKenzie thought his mom's remaining days were dwindling.

The 97-year-old woman had developed a severe case of what was thought to be an untreatable form of squamous cell carcinoma, the second leading form of skin cancer.

Lesions had developed over much of her right leg, in such numbers and size that chemotherapy and surgery were ruled out as treatments.

A type of therapy that harnesses the immune system is giving new hope to people battling a once hopeless cancer -- melanoma that's spread to the brain.

New research involving more than 2,700 U.S. patients is confirming what specialists in the field have long known -- that "checkpoint blockade" treatment can beat back these devastating tumors.

"Physicians who treat patients w...

Stick or spray-on sunscreens are essential tools against skin cancer, but it's important to use them the right way, a dermatologist says.

"Sticks are easy for under the eyes and the backs of the hands, while spray sunscreens are often easier to apply on children," Dr. Debra Wattenberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release.

"However, it's important to take p...

Flight attendants may face higher-than-average risks of breast and skin cancers, a new study finds -- though the reasons why aren't yet clear.

Harvard researchers found that compared with women in the general U.S. population, female flight attendants had a 51 percent higher rate of breast cancer. Meanwhile, their rates of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers were about two to four t...

If you could protect yourself from cancer, you'd do it, right? Yet most Americans still aren't taking the easiest step to prevent the most commonly diagnosed type -- skin cancer, which will affect one in five people at some point in their lives.

Only 14 percent of American men and 30 percent of women regularly use sunscreen when outside for more than an hour, according to a report fro...

Where fear of skin cancer has little effect, vanity may succeed.

In a new study, sun worshippers who were shown computer images of how their face would age after years of ultraviolet (UV) light exposure often decided to quit the tanning habit.

In fact, "a single, 10-minute exposure to one's own face, digitally aged, with and without excessive UV exposure, reduced indoor and...

A computer can beat even highly experienced dermatologists in spotting deadly melanomas, researchers report.

The study is the latest to test the idea that "artificial intelligence" can improve medical diagnoses.

Typically, it works like this: Researchers develop an algorithm using "deep learning" -- where the computer system essentially mimics the brain's neural networks. It...

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