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Health News Results - 122

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

Many surgeons have neck and back pain after performing operations, a small new study finds.

It included 53 surgeons (34 men and 19 women) who did 116 operations at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. They wore devices that measured neck, back and arm posture during surgery, and were asked about pain and fatigue levels before and after.

Pain increased after surgery in every body area...

Could long hours at the office put you at risk for hypothyroidism?

New research suggests it's possible: Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) was more than twice as common in adults who worked 53 to 83 hours a week as in those who worked 36 to 42 hours a week (3.5% vs. 1.4%).

Hypothyroidism can cause tiredness, depression, feeling cold and weight gain, and it's als...

As the coronavirus pandemic stresses the U.S. health care system, personal protective equipment -- including high-tech masks -- are in desperately short supply.

But a new study suggests an innovative solution: Reusable respirators typically used by construction or factory workers may be a viable alternative to disposable N95 respirators used by health care personnel.

The r...

"I have worked the last four days, and I have cried every day."

Eileen McStay, a registered nurse at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it is mentally and emotionally wearing her and her colleagues down.

McStay works on a hospital floor filled with nothing but lonely, scared coronavirus patients, some of whom are fi...

Being recognized for your efforts at work could reduce your risk of burnout, new research suggests.

Emotional exhaustion, decreased productivity and depersonalization (loss of identity) are characteristics of burnout, a widespread problem that takes a significant toll on workers and employers, the researchers said.

For the study, they asked 328 employees to complete a questi...

Millions of workers who constantly interact with the public are exposed to viruses and bacteria on a weekly basis, and so they face a greater risk of falling ill with coronavirus, a new analysis reveals.

Due to the nature of their jobs, about 1 in 10 U.S. workers (14.4 million) face exposure to infections weekly, while nearly 2 of 10 (26.7 million) are exposed at least once a month in...

The argument against paid maternity leave in the United States often focuses on the cost, but a new study suggests that more paid leave would not only be beneficial for families, but also for society.

In the study, researchers found that new parents with paid medical leave of 12 weeks or more were more likely to be in better mental and physical shape than those who received less paid ...

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

People who work with potentially dangerous chemicals or hazardous metals such as lead may unwittingly bring those toxic substances home, a new review says.

In the home, these substances put family members, especially children, at risk of serious illness.

While precautions may be taken in the workplace to protect workers, these take-home exposures may fall into a regulatory bli...

People afflicted with cluster headaches miss work twice as often as colleagues without the debilitating headaches, a new study finds.

Cluster headaches are extremely painful headaches that last from 15 minutes to three hours, for many days, or even weeks, in a row. They're more common in men.

For the study, Swedish researchers compared more than 3,200 working-age people who ...

Protections may be in place for employees who breastfeed, but the onus is on working moms to seek out the resources they need, according to a University of Georgia survey.

"We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation," said lead author Rachel McCardel, ...

When most people think of sexual harassment of females on the job, they assume it's happening to lower-level staffers. But surprisingly, women supervisors actually encounter more of it than other female workers, a new study finds.

Researchers examined workplace sexual harassment in the United States, Japan and Sweden. They found that female supervisors experienced between 30% and ...

More than one-third of working Americans don't get enough sleep, and the problem is greatest among the police, the military, health care workers and truckers, researchers report.

Their analysis of data from more than 150,000 employed adults between 2010 and 2018 also found that the rate of inadequate sleep (7 hours or less) rose from about 31% to nearly 36% during that time....

Minimum wage laws can be a literal lifesaver for people who are struggling to get by, a new study suggests.

The suicide rate declines among less-educated folks when the minimum wage is increased, researchers discovered.

States experience as much as a 6% decrease in their suicide rates for every $1 increase in the minimum wage, said lead researcher John Kaufman, a doctora...

If you're not taking regular breaks to move around during your workday, your muscles may rebel after being scrunched in your desk chair hour after hour.

The rebellion might be felt in your neck, shoulders, back, hips and legs when you do finally stand up. Stop the insurrection with these three simple stretching exercises you can do without even leaving your workstation or office.

...

It's a connection that health officials might miss, but an alarming new study shows that when factories close, deaths from opioid overdoses soar.

"There's this sense of increasing despair among people -- especially people who are working-class who have seen in the last several decades a lot of their economic opportunities wither away," said lead researcher Dr. Atheendar Venkataraman...

Long hours spent working will do no favors for your blood pressure, a new Canadian study suggests.

The five-year study tracked the working hours and blood pressure readings of 3,500 white-collar workers at three public institutions in the province of Quebec.

Compared to those who worked less than 35 hours a week, those who worked 49 or more hours each week had a 70% high...

Nurses get less sleep before their scheduled shifts compared to nonwork days, which could affect patient care, according to a new study.

How much less sleep? Almost an hour and a half.

"Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," said study lead author Amy Witkoski Stimpfe...

Being a musician might be hard on your hearing, new British research suggests.

Those in the music industry have a much higher risk of tinnitus than people who work in quieter settings, a new study finds.

People with tinnitus hear ringing, buzzing or whistling noises when there are no external sounds.

"Our research shows that people working in the music industry are...

Could your chosen profession determine the health of your heart?

It could certainly have an influence, new research suggests.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 65,000 postmenopausal women in the United States and found that several jobs were associated with poor heart health.

Compared to women with other jobs, the risk of poor heart health was: 36% higher...

Requiring drivers to get treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) saved a trucking company a large amount in insurance costs for other health conditions, a new study shows.

People with apnea repeatedly stop breathing and wake partially during the night, resulting in poor sleep that can worsen other medical conditions.

Researchers noted that even though OSA has been linked...

Few meals may be less loved than the workday lunch. Pulled from a brown bag, yanked from a microwave in the middle of a shift or nabbed from a bland cafeteria between meetings, it's more associated with frustration than nutrition.

A recent online survey by the Harris Poll for the American Heart Association and the food service company Aramark put numbers on that frustration: More tha...

Hard-hat jobs are tough and demanding, often entailing intense physical labor performed in dangerous situations.

But a new study finds construction work also comes with another danger: An increased risk of drug abuse.

Construction workers and miners are much more likely than people in other professions to misuse opioids, cocaine and marijuana, the research showed

C...

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to findings published online Oct. 18 in J...

Money may not buy happiness, but a bigger paycheck is good for your heart. And new research suggests the reverse is also true: When income drops, your risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure goes up.

"One could argue that the fraying social and economic fabric of American society is, quite literally, killing us," said Dr. Edward Havranek, a professor of medicine and cardiology...

Add this to the list of daily hazards taxi drivers face: A new study shows they are exposed to excessive levels of black carbon from diesel engines.

Taxi drivers experience higher levels of the pollutant than couriers, truckers, waste removal and emergency service workers, researchers say.

For the study, 140 professional drivers in central London carried monitors linked wit...

Working around high levels of pesticides may translate into a high risk for heart trouble later, a new study suggests.

That was the case for a group of Japanese-American men in Hawaii who were followed for more than three decades. Compared to men who had not worked around pesticides, those who had the greatest exposure had a 45% higher risk for heart disease or stroke, researchers...

Walking speed may indicate whether young stroke survivors are ready to return to work, a new study suggests.

And 3 feet per second may be the threshold that predicts whether they can meet a workday's challenges, the researchers found.

One of every four people who has a stroke is younger than 65 years old. As many as 44% may be unable to return to work, largely because of...

As Americans mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and man's first steps on the surface of the moon, a new study offers a solution for a vexing problem that many astronauts experience on their return to Earth.

All the time that astronauts spend floating weightless can trigger fainting and dizziness when they once again feel Earth's gravity, but the new research finds that...

A new U.S. government rule on asbestos is at best a toothless measure against the cancer-causing material, critics charge.

The rule, laid out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), went into effect in June. The agency says it was designed to strengthen decades-old public health protections.

But two former government officials said the rule does nothing to address...

Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, a new study finds.

Work disruptions range from mild, such as adjusting work hours, to severe. Severe disruptions include moving from full- to part-time jobs, taking a leave of absence or even early retirement.

The study included 642 workers at a public un...

If you struggle to eat a healthy lunch during your workday, a new survey suggests you're far from alone.

"The good news is most people said they are interested in doing better" when it comes to healthy eating, said Dr. Anne Thorndike, vice chair of the nutrition committee at the American Heart Association (AHA).

The survey included more than 900 U.S. adults who typically ea...

A possible link between World Trade Center dust and prostate cancer in first responders has been found by researchers.

Exposure to dust at the New York City site after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks triggered chronic inflammation in the responders' prostates, which may have contributed to their cancer, according to the Mount Sinai Health researchers.

They noted that i...

Almost half of American firefighters have some form of physical and emotional burnout, with sleep problems and mental health disorders as major factors, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed more than 6,300 firefighters from 66 fire departments nationwide and found that 49% had high levels of physical and emotional burnout in at least one area.

Those who'd been diagnos...

Being first at the office and the last to leave may help get you that promotion, but new research warns that working long hours may not be so good for your heart.

And the longer you do it, the higher your risk for a stroke, French researchers said.

The findings come from a review of self-reported work habits and heart health among roughly 144,000 French men and women between the...

Many health care workers are still on the job even if they have symptoms of a cold, flu or other respiratory infection, putting patients and coworkers at risk, a new study finds.

It included more than 2,700 health care workers at nine Canadian hospitals who completed online diaries whenever they had symptoms of a respiratory infection.

Half reported an acute respiratory vira...

Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 70,000 adults in the United Kingdom, found that when unemployed people found a job, their mental health typically improved. But, on average, it only took eight hours of work per week -- with no sign of extra benefits with more time ...

Being yelled at or insulted is never easy. But it's a situation faced by about one-quarter of U.S. home health care workers, a new study finds.

Certain environments, such as caring for someone with dementia or working in a very cramped space, were linked to a higher risk of verbal abuse from patients or their kin.

"Our study found that aides frequently experience verbal abus...

New research shatters the image of U.S. soldiers as the epitome of fitness and primed for battle: Instead, they are less likely to have ideal blood pressure than their civilian counterparts.

In fact, less than one-third of active Army personnel have ideal blood pressure (120/80 mm Hg), compared with over half of the general population, the researchers found.

"It's unexpecte...

Exhausted, stressed-out doctors are responsible for poorer care, patient dissatisfaction and malpractice lawsuits that carry a huge cost for U.S. health care, researchers report.

In fact, it's calculated that physician burnout adds nearly $5 billion a year to health care spending in the United States.

"Physician burnout is known to be associated with increased physician turn...

Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds.

It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping and lack of understanding about mental health issues.

That's the consensus of researchers from Brazil, the Netherlands and t...

If your back aches while on the job, you have plenty of company: New research shows that nearly 40 million American workers suffer from chronic lower back pain.

In all, that's more than a quarter of the workforce reporting lower back pain severe enough to affect their ability to work. As striking as these findings are, the researchers believe that many more workers suffer from lower b...

Job stress, high blood pressure and poor sleep may be a recipe for an early death, German researchers report.

In a study of nearly 2,000 workers with high blood pressure who were followed for almost 18 years, those who reported having both a stressful job and poor sleep were three times more likely to die from heart disease than those who slept well and didn't have a trying job, the ...

Being bullied as a youngster may lead to lifelong struggles in adulthood.

New research warns that victims of teenage bullying face a 40% greater risk for mental health problems by the time they hit their mid-20s.

Young adults with a history of adolescent bullying may also see their odds for unemployment spike by 35%, investigators found.

For the study, the...

Nearly half of U.S. workplaces now offer wellness programs, a new study finds.

"Most American adults work, and many spend half or more of their waking hours at work," said study author Laura Linnan. She's a professor in the department of health behavior at the University of North Carolina's School of Global Public Health.

"Where we work, how long we work, the conditions of...

There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

For example, the difference between neighbor...

Many American women feel less welcome at work once they become pregnant, a new study finds.

On the other hand, expectant and new fathers often get a career boost.

"We found that pregnant women experienced decreased career encouragement in the workplace only after they disclosed they were pregnant," said study author Samantha Paustian-Underdahl. She's an assistant professor o...

If your job keeps you chained to a desk all day, you might be able to erase the ill effects with regular exercise, a large new study suggests.

Research has shown that people who spend a lot of time sitting may pay for it with a higher heart disease risk and a shorter lifespan. But the new study, of nearly 150,000 adults, indicates you can avoid those consequences by fitting in exercis...