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Results for search "Sunburn / Tan".

14 Apr

Should Indoor Tanning Beds Be Banned For Teens?

A universal ban on indoor tanning for teens would prevent more than 15,000 cases of deadly melanoma, researchers say.

Health News Results - 37

If you're at the beach or pool, applying sunscreen before and after you've been in the water is a must, a cancer specialist says.

The intensity of exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays "is higher under water than it is above water," said Dr. Arun Mavanur. He is a surgical oncologist at the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute at LifeBridge Health, in Baltimore.

"UV rays also ar...

When a suspicious skin lesion sends you scurrying to a dermatologist, asking for a full-body skin check could save your life.

Dermatologists are twice as likely to find skin cancer with a full-body check, a new study reveals. More than half of the skin cancers discovered were not in the location the patient was concerned about.

"If the dermatologist did not check their entire body,...

Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

"Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

Here are some of her tips:

  • Wear a sunscreen with SPF ...

Sunglasses are often considered a fashion statement, but one expert says the style you choose is less important than picking a pair of shades that best protect your eyes from the sun's damaging rays.

"Wearing sunglasses without 100% UV protection is actually a serious health risk," said Dr. Dianna Seldomridge, clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

"Regardl...

New research finds that countries with more cloudy days tend to have higher colon cancer rates. Lower levels of vitamin D, the "sunshine vitamin," may be to blame.

So, boosting your vitamin D levels through exposure to sunlight could help reduce your risk of colon cancer, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

"Differences in UVB [ultraviolet-B] li...

Sunscreen isn't just for pool gatherings and beach outings: Using sunscreen every day could reduce your risk of skin cancer, experts say.

Daily use of at least an SPF 15 sunscreen can lower your risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- by 50%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

If you spend most of your day indoors, SPF 15 should provide adequate protection, bu...

It's long been known the sun's rays can cause skin cancer.

But a new poll shows that only about 30% of American adults say they're concerned about developing skin cancer -- even though nearly 70% have at least one risk factor for the disease.

The American Academy of Dermatology's survey found that 49% of respondents were more worried about avoiding sunburn than preventing skin cance...

Think you know all you need to know about slathering on the sunscreen this summer?

Maybe you don't.

As the Memorial Day weekend begins, many Americans are confused about the proper application of sunscreen and about its sun protection factor (SPF), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says.

A recent academy poll of 1,000 U.S. adults found that while 80% know they should a...

You might think everybody knows how to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays, but a new survey reveals that one-third of Americans lack a basic understanding of sun safety and skin cancer.

That's the surprising takeaway from an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey of 1,000 U.S. adults.

Fifty-three percent of respondents didn't realize shade offers protection from t...

A U.S.-wide ban on teen use of tanning beds would prevent thousands of cases of skin cancer and save millions in health care costs, researchers say.

Indoor tanning has been linked to an increased risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- and the highest risk is among people who start using tanning beds at a young age. Despite that danger, many U.S. teens do.

While ban...

Most people are familiar with common sun-protection advice, from wearing and reapplying sunscreen to putting on a hat.

But a new Canadian study finds that for people who take certain blood pressure medications, that advice becomes even more critical because those drugs can increase their sensitivity to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

The researchers reviewed data for nearly...

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect is not due to better uptake of the healthy "sunshine vitamin," vitamin D, noted the Scottish research team led by Richard...

Scientists may have discovered why cold sores caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) are triggered by stress, illness and sunburn.

The finding could lead to new ways to prevent recurring cold sores and herpes-related eye disease, U.S. and British researchers say.

More than half of Americans are infected with herpes simplex virus. It is spread through close contact with someone wh...

The great outdoors can soothe the soul, but new research suggests that working outside might also guard against breast cancer.

The study wasn't designed to say how working outside affects chances of developing breast cancer, but vitamin D exposure may be the driving force, the researchers suggested.

"The main hypothesis is that sun exposure through vitamin D production may decrease ...

Researchers from two universities in Utah have a warning for students planning to hit the slopes or play in the snow without sunscreen: You could greatly increase your risk of skin cancer.

A survey of students by Brigham Young University College of Nursing in Provo found that only 9% use sunscreen. They also found students' use of tanning beds surges in winter, especially among men.

Young women who regularly visit tanning salons may have an increased risk of developing endometriosis, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the findings, from a large study of U.S. women, don't prove that tanning beds help cause the painful pelvic condition.

But, they noted, the study might give women more incentive to avoid indoor tanning.

Endometriosis is a condition in wh...

Headed to the beach or park for a little fresh air? Don't forget your sun protection, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans, but many don't protect themselves from harmful UV rays.

Sixty percent of respondents to an AAD survey said they had had such a bad sunburn their ...

With many beaches and parks opening in time for Memorial Day, the American Cancer Society is reminding people to practice sun safety.

Overexposing yourself to the sun increases your risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, with almost 5.5 million cases each year. That's more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.

"COVID-19 ...

Though most Americans are well aware that protecting themselves from sunburn is important, many don't take precautions, a new survey finds.

Protecting yourself from exposure to sunlight is the best way of preventing skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

The results of the AAD survey show that 76% of Americans know the importance of sun pr...

Indoor athletes may be vitamin D-deficient, putting themselves at risk of injury and poor performance, a small study finds.

Researchers assessed vitamin D levels in players on George Mason University's men's and women's basketball teams. For the 2018-2019 season, players were given a supplement with a high dose, low dose or no vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for building a...

The chemicals in sunscreens help shield people from the sun's rays, but they are also absorbed into the body at levels that raise some safety questions, a new study confirms.

The study, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a follow-up to a 2019 investigation. Both reached the same conclusion: The active ingredients in popular sunscreens can be absorbed into the blood at ...

Widely condemned for driving up skin cancer risk, tanning beds remain common in that shrine to healthy living: gyms.

That's the finding from a study of tanning beds in three of America's six largest gym chains: Anytime Fitness, Planet Fitness and Gold's Gym.

Collectively, they operate more than 1,900 branches in the areas included in the study (33 states and Washington, D.C....

Cases of deadly melanomas on the head and neck rose more than 51% over two decades among young people in the United States and Canada, a new study reports.

Researchers found that the incidence of head and neck melanoma rose nearly 4% a year from 1995 to 2001, and 1.2% a year from 2001 to 2014 in children and young adults.

Using data from a North American cancer r...

Don't invite skin cancer to your holiday weekend.

As you celebrate America's independence at beaches, pools or backyard parties, remember that the sun's damaging rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. -- and protecting yourself is a must.

"When it comes to sunscreen, people in general don't put on enough, and they don't put it on as often as they should," said Dr. William...

A combination of depression and genetic risk may fuel an addiction to indoor tanning.

That's the conclusion of a new study out of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.

For the study, researchers surveyed nearly 300 women who used indoor tanning beds, sunlamps or sun booths, and analyzed DNA samples. The women were white and between 18 and 30 ye...

When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is normally invisible to the naked eye.

"T...

Whether you're at the beach, the park or a pool this summer, be sure to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, and most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Fortunately, everyone can take action to protect their s...

Interest in homemade sunscreens is hot, but many of these do-it-yourself brews lack effective sun protection, a new study warns.

Researchers found that only about one-third of homemade sunscreens on the popular information-sharing website Pinterest specified how much sun protection factor (SPF) each "natural" sunblock contained. In some cases, SPF content dipped as low as 2 -- far bel...

For all of those men who view a mustache as a largely ornamental addition to their masculine appearance, a new study reveals it can also guard against lip cancer.

"Mustaches seem to protect the lip the same way that hair protects the scalp," explained study author Dr. Daniel Aires. He is director of dermatology with the University of Kansas Health System. ...

The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game.

"I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor.

Within days, Langill was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma -- an advanced stage of the mos...

Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found.

Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers.

One in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer a...

For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.

Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test subjects applied spray, lotion and cream...

As you dig into gardening this spring, be sure you don't plant the seeds of skin problems, an expert advises.

"Adverse skin reactions from gardening are very common and may include bug bites and stings, plant-induced rashes, and cuts and infections," said Dr. Sonya Kenkare, a dermatologist in Evergreen Park, Ill.

"While most of these can be easily treated, some can be serio...

Sunscreen may do double duty when you're outside on a summer day, keeping you cool as it protects your skin from the sun's harmful rays.

New research suggests how: When unprotected skin is exposed to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, skin cells typically see a drop in levels of nitric oxide. This compound helps the skin's small blood vessels to relax and widen.

Reduced nitric...

Even though many moisturizers now contain sunscreens, people may not put them on their faces as carefully as they do sunscreen lotions, new research suggests.

"Moisturizer is not as well applied as sunscreen," said lead author Kevin Hamill, a lecturer in eye and vision science at the University of Liverpool in England.

"Therefore, if planning prolonged sun exposure, we advis...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to tighten regulation of over-the-counter sunscreen products.

Included in the proposed rule are updates on sunscreen safety, sun protection factor (SPF) requirements, and the effectiveness of insect repellent/sunscreen combinations.

"The proposed rule that we issued today would update regulatory requirements for most ...

If one of your resolutions for 2019 is to improve your health, reducing your risk of cancer should be part of that goal, a cancer expert says.

While cancer risk factors such as family history and aging can't be controlled, lifestyle changes such as eating right, staying active and not smoking can lower your risk, said Dr. Elias Obeid. He is director of breast, ovarian and prostate can...

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