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Results for search "Neurology".

Health News Results - 734

For decades, Todd Vogt has been dedicated to the sport of rowing, believing he was in peak physical condition. Then, a series of symptoms began to emerge, turning his life upside down.

"My left arm stopped swinging, and I felt incredibly fatigued," Vogt, 49, recalled. "Eventually,...

Ultra-processed foods are bad for more than your waistline: New research shows they seem to raise the risk of stroke and dementia-related memory or thinking problems.

A 10% increase in the amount of ultra-processed foods a person eats is associated with a 16% higher risk of cognitive problems, researchers f...

Have you been socially and economically "upwardly mobile" through your life? If so, you may be doing your brain health a big favor, new Japanese research suggests.

Folks who scored high in terms of "climbing the ladder" tended to avoid dementia or develop it years later than folks whose lives weren't on such a successful track, reported a team led by

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 22, 2024
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  • MONDAY, May 20, 2024 -- When a stroke hits, "time is brain," doctors say, with neurons beginning to die off in minutes.

    Quickly figuring out which type of stroke a patient has been hit with is crucial. Now, an experimental blood test might speed that process along.<...

    Climate change is likely to make brain conditions like stroke, migraine, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis even worse, a new review warns.

    The potential effects of a changing climate is likely to be substantial on a range of neurological conditions, researc...

    A good night’s sleep helps clear the cobwebs from your mind, and researchers now think they’ve figured out how dreaming helps.

    A night spent dreaming appears to help people better process extreme events in their lives, as well as clear daily mundane things from their memory, according to results published recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 16, 2024
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  • THURSDAY, May 9, 2024 (HealthDay News) — Though it is a widespread disorder, neuropathy often goes undiagnosed, new research shows, leaving many people at risk of falls, infection and even amputation.

    Neuropathy is nerve damage that causes numbness and pain in feet and hands. 

    A study of 169 people treated at an outpatient clinic in Flint, Mich., found that 73% had neuropathy...

    A tiny, flexible device that wraps around the spinal cord could be a breakthrough in the treatment of spinal injuries.

    The device, developed by a University of Cambridge team, can record 360-degree information and provide a complete picture of spinal cord activity, researchers report in the journal Science Advances.

    The device ...

    Researchers say they’ve identified a human “neural compass” -- a pattern of brain activity that helps prevent humans from becoming lost.

    For the first time, the internal compass humans use to orient themselves and navigate through the environment has been pinpointed in the human brain, researchers reported May 6 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2024
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  • MONDAY, May 6, 2024 (HealthDay News) — Two-thirds of kids who suffer a subtle type of epileptic seizure go undiagnosed when they seek emergency room treatment, new research shows.

    “We do not know how many people are walking around with seizures that they are unaware of, and we are unaware of," said researcher Jacq...

    THURSDAY, May 2, 2024 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said it will spend $3 billion to help states and territories identify and replace lead water pipes.

    "The science is clear, there is no safe level of lead exposure, and the primary source of harmful exposure in drinking water is through lead pipes," EPA Administrator

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 2, 2024
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  • Add one more damaging consequence of sleep apnea to the list: New research suggests it's related to late-life epilepsy.

    Late-onset epilepsy is defined as seizures that tend to begin only after the age of 60.

    The condition might be related to underlying heart or brain illnesses, noted study co-author Dr. Rebecca Gottesman, chie...

    Advanced scanning techniques can find hidden inflammation in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, a new study shows.

    This “smoldering” inflammation detected by positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans could help explain why patients continue to decline even though imaging shows no brain changes, researchers reported recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2024
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  • Many people dogged by depression are turning to the psilocybin found in "magic mushrooms" to ease the condition, and often reporting success.

    Now, new research suggests much of the credit for that success lies in the relationship between th...

    Soldiers can suffer brain injury if they are repeatedly exposed to explosive blasts, a new study shows.

    Further, the more frequently a soldier is exposed to explosions, the greater their risk for brain injury, researchers reported April 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Based on this, researchers intend to develop a diagnostic test to detect blast b...

    Antipsychotics can substantially increase dementia patients’ risk of many serious health problems, a new study warns.

    Dementia patients prescribed antipsychotics have increased risk of stroke, blood clots, heart attack, heart failure, bone fractures, pneumonia and kidney damage, researchers ...

    In a new study, people living with HIV who got standard meds to keep the virus at bay also had much lower rates of Alzheimer's disease -- suggesting the drugs might also lower risks for the brain illness.

    It's early-stage research, but it's possible that mechanisms used by these HIV drugs work at a ...

    Most folks think of blinking as the eyes' version of windshield wipers, clearing the eye of debris and maybe lubricating it, too.

    But blinking is much more than that, researchers report: It also helps the brain process what it's seeing.

    That's perhaps counterintuitive: Wouldn't it make sense to not blink, so eyes are receiving an uninterrupted stream of information?

    Tapping the power of the small brain region called the cerebellum could improve patients’ ability to move cutting-edge robotic limbs, a new study suggests.

    The cerebellum is an ancient structure located under the brain, just above where the spinal cord connects to the brain.

    This structure has largely been overlooked by prosthetics researchers in favor of the cerebral cortex, whic...

    Volatile and toxic chemicals commonly stored in garages can increase the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Gasoline or kerosene, gas-powered equipment and lawn care chemicals represented the top three risk factors for ALS found in garages, researchers report.

    Exposures to each of these increased ALS risk around 15%, results show.

    Other chemicals found in garages tha...

    The discovery of a gene variant that rids the brain of toxic plaques linked to Alzheimer's might lead to new treatments for the disease, researchers report.

    The variant arises naturally in people who don't seem to get Alzheimer's disease despite having another gene, called APOEe4, that strongly prom...

    Obese folks are less likely to benefit from a nerve-stimulation treatment for sleep apnea that's recently been made available to them, a new study reports.

    The treatment is likely to be 75% less effective among obese people with BMIs of 32 to 35, compa...

    THURSDAY, April 4, 2024 (HealthDayNews) -- Following disappointing trial results, the maker of a controversial ALS drug said it is pulling the medication off the market.

    In a

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 4, 2024
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  • Desks that require folks to stand or move as they work also might help them produce better results on the job, a new study suggests.

    People's brains became sharper when working at a desk that made them stand, step or walk rather than sit, results show.

    Reasoning scores in particular improved when at an active workstation, researchers said.

    “It is feasible to blend movement w...

    When a soldier is rushed to medical care following a blast or other injury to the head, time is crucial in deciding just how extensive that injury is.

    Now, the U.S. Army has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared a bedside whole blood test that can answer that question in about 15 minutes.

    Prior tests relied on blood plasma or serum, and that meant sending ...

    Smacking a 100-mile-an-hour fastball or shooting down a fast-moving alien invader in a video game might involve more than fast reflexes, researchers report.

    Elite gamers and pro athletes may also have a hidden vision advantage over others, a new study finds.

    Some people can perceive rapidly changing visual cues better than others, researchers reported April 1 in the journal PLOS...

    For folks who have battled alcohol dependency for years, any treatment that could curb or block alcohol cravings would be a huge advance.

    Now, research in mice is giving a glimmer of hope that just such a therapy might be possible.

    A compound -- so far dubbed LY2444296 -- appears to block a key brain cell receptor called the kappa opioid receptor (KOP), a team at the Scripps Researc...

    A genetic mutation that boosts cell function could protect people against Alzheimer's disease, even if they carry another gene mutation known to boost dementia risk.

    The newly discovered mutation appears to protect people who...

    Children who are obese face double the odds of developing multiple sclerosis later in life, a new study warns.

    The overall odds for any one child to develop the neurodegenerative illness remains very low. However, the Swedish researchers believe the link could help explain rising rates of MS.

    "There are several studies showing that MS has increased over several decades and obesity ...

    Out of a host of possible risk factors for dementia, three really stood out in a new analysis: Diabetes, air pollution and alcohol.

    British and American researchers used brain scans to focus on a neurological network they labeled a "weak spot" in the brain. This network is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, as well as

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 28, 2024
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  • Fried foods not only wreck the waistline, but they could also be harming the brain, a new study of lab rats suggests.

    Fed chow that was fried in sesame or sunflower oil, the rodents developed liver and colon problems that wound up affecting their brain health, researchers found.

    These brain health effects not only were found in the lab rats that munched down the fried food, but also...

    Youngsters might have good cause to think they're brainier than their parents or grandparents, a new study finds.

    It turns out that human brains are getting larger with each generation, potentially adding more brain reserve and reducing the overall risk of dementia, researchers report March 25 in the journa...

    Chemicals found in common household products might damage the brain's wiring, a new study warns.

    These chemicals -- found in disinfectants, cleaners, hair products, furniture and textiles -- could be linked to degenerative brain diseases like multiple sclerosis and autism, researchers report.

    The chemicals specifically affect the brain's oligodendrocytes, a specialized type of cell ...

    A surgical treatment used to treat conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome and back sciatica might also help relieve the pain of patients with diabetic neuropathy, a new study finds.

    Surgical nerve decompression significantly eased pain among a small group of people with diabetic neuropathy for up to five years, researchers report.

    In the surgery, researchers removed inflexible tissu...

    Some people diagnosed with schizophrenia might instead be suffering from a rare visual condition that can cause other people's faces to appear “demonic,” a new study argues.

    The condition, called prosopometamorphopsia (PMO), can cause others' facial features to appear horrific -- drooped, larger, smaller, out of position or stretched in disturbing ways.

    “Not surprisingly, peo...

    A common antiseizure drug used to treat epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorder does not appear to increase the risk of autism for kids exposed to it in the womb, a new study says.

    Topiramate does not contribute to any ri...

    The flu is more likely to lead to a neurological disorder than COVID, according to a new study that surprised its authors. 

    "While the results were not what we expected to find, they are reassuring in that we found being hospitalized with COVID did not lead to more care for common neurological conditions when compared to being hospitalized with influenza," study co-author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 21, 2024
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  • Folks can learn their risk for Parkinson's disease and other related brain disorders through a simple skin biopsy, a new study says.

    Skin tests can detect an abnormal form of alpha-synuclein, a protein that is the hallmark of Parkinson's disease and similar degenerative brain illnesses, researchers say.

    This simple test could be a reliable and convenient tool to help doctors accurat...

    Nearly 7 million American seniors are living with Alzheimer's dementia, placing a huge strain on both personal caregivers and the U.S. health care system, according to a new Alzheimer's Association report.

    The cost of caring for seniors with Alzheimer's is projected to reach $360 billion this year, up $15 billion from just a year ago, says the association's

  • Dennis Thompson and Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporters
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  • March 20, 2024
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  • More than two-thirds of Chicago kids younger than 6 live in homes with tap water tainted by lead, a new analysis says.

    There are detectable levels of lead in the drinking water supplied to 68% of young children in the Windy City, say researchers with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Pub...

    “Havana Syndrome” appears to cause real and severe symptoms among federal employees suffering from the mystery illness, but there's no evidence of brain injury or biological abnormalities among them, a new report shows.

    Researchers evaluated 81 U.S. diplomats and other federal employees, mostly stationed abroad, who had complained of hearing noise and feeling head pressure just before...

    Astronauts who have never had headaches may develop migraines and other tension-type headaches for the first time when they go into space.

    A side effect of zero gravity, these headaches start with motion sickness as astronauts adapt to long-haul space flight, according to new research published March 13 in the journal

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 15, 2024
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  • Instead of approving the new Alzheimer's drug donanemab this month, as was expected, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will now require the experimental medication be scrutinized more closely by an expert panel, the drug's maker said Friday.

    “The FDA has informed Lilly it wants to further understand topics related to evaluating the safety and efficacy of donanemab, including the saf...

    Dementia could three times more common among people suffering from essential tremor, a movement disorder that causes involuntary shaking, a new study suggests.

    “Not only do tremors affect a person's ability to complete daily tasks such writing and eating, our study suggests that people with essential trem...

    Folks who've suffered a concussion and then develop headaches show iron accumulation in their brains, new research discovers.

    Excess brain iron stores are a hallmark of damage, noted a team led by Simona Nikolova, of the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. The team is slated to present the results in April at the an...

    Sleep apnea could have detrimental effects on the brain, causing memory or thinking problems, a new study suggests.

    People suffering from sleep apnea are about 50% more likely to also report having memory or thinking problems, compared to those without sleep apnea, researchers say.

    “These findings highlight the importance of early screening for sleep apnea,” said researcher

    Vaping and skipped meals appear to be the main causes of frequent headaches among teens, a new study says.

    Teens who ate breakfast and dinner with their family had a lower risk of frequent headaches than those who regularly missed meals, researchers report Feb. 28 in the journal Neurology.

    Meanwhile, vaping also was associated with frequent headaches for those 12 to 17, res...

    A bicycle built for two could be a positive prescription for Parkinson's patients and their caregivers, a small, preliminary study says.

    Parkinson's patients had better overall quality of life, improved mobility, and faster walking speed after sharing regular rides on a stationary tandem bike with a care partner, researchers plan to report at the annual meeting of the American Academy of ...

    In a finding that unearths yet another way Long COVID can harm health, new research finds the condition may trigger thinking declines.

    Published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study involved cognitive testing on nearly 113,000 people in England. It found that thos...

    Perhaps by reducing anxiety, a service dog can help reduce seizures in people with tough-to-treat epilepsy, a new study finds.

    A group of 25 study participants had an average 31% fewer seizures after months of owning a service dog trained to help people with epilepsy.

    And seven of those patients experienced a 50% to 100% reduction in seizures, researchers report in the Feb. 28 issue...