Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Show All Health News Results

Health News Results - 1253

Suffering from PTSD may take a toll on your sex life if you're a woman, new research reveals.

About 10% of women have PTSD symptoms because of combat exposure, childhood abuse and sexual violence. Little research has been done looking at how these symptoms might affect sexual functioning among midlife women.

"As women age, there are many reasons why sexual functioning may become an ...

"Talk therapy" may help people with fibromyalgia manage their chronic pain -- and alter the brain's pain-processing circuitry along the way, a new study shows.

Researchers found that after eight sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), patients with fibromyalgia felt less burdened by their pain and other symptoms in daily life. And that was related, in part, to changes in areas of ...

A longstanding core belief of mental health maintains that people must confront their fears to ease the anxiety and depression stemming from those negative thoughts.

Now a new study argues that, for some people, suppressing negative thoughts and worries might be a more successful strategy.

Mental health actually improved for some study participants after they underwent training to h...

Highly processed packaged foods and drinks may be quick, cheap and tasty, but new research suggests they’re also likely to up your risk for depression.

Among big consumers of ultra-processed foods, depression risk may rise by as much as 50%, the new study found, particularly when those foods are artificially sweetened.

“Given what we know about these foods and the important role...

Nearly one in five counties across the United States lack psychiatrists or internet service, making it difficult for around 10.5 million Americans to find mental health care, a new study shows.

The counties examined in the study were more likely to be in rural areas, have higher unemployment rates, and have populations that were more likely to be uninsured and lack a bachelor’s degree....

Patients with Parkinson’s disease already face poorer mental and physical health, but now a new study shows they also suffer from decreased levels of hope and self-esteem due to the stigma associated with their disease.

“There are patients who don't even disclose the disease to family members because they're afraid that the children may change their opinion of them or start making pl...

A new study is adding to evidence that the party drug "ecstasy" can boost the benefits of talk therapy for people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

In a clinical trial, researchers found that three months of talk therapy, assisted by carefully monitored doses of ecstasy (MDMA), worked significantly better than therapy alone.

Of 52 patients who completed MDMA-assi...

A lot of older adults have digestive diseases that can be debilitating. They can also be linked to loneliness and depression, a new study says.

“These conditions are very common in ambulatory care,” said gastroenterologist Dr. Shirley Cohen-Mekelburg, who specializes in problems like ...

For a needed mood boost, skip social media and strike up an in-person conversation with someone instead.

Face-to-face socializing boosts mood more than screen time, a new study finds.

People often expect that will be the case, but they don’t always follow that instinct, according to the researchers.

"These findings suggest that people may use their smartphones because ...

A healthy lifestyle -- especially getting enough sleep -- may offer substantial protection against depression, new research suggests.

The study, of more than 287,000 British adults, found that several lifestyle factors seemed to curb the risk of developing depression over the next nine years. Among them were eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, staying socially active, not smo...

Seniors, pick up those knitting needles, some paintbrushes or that favorite novel, because new research suggests that having a hobby is linked to having lower depression in older people.

Hobbies might include anything from gardening to playing games, arts and crafts, volunteering, reading or being part of a club, according to the study, which spanned numerous countries and included more t...

Could an algorithm take your job someday? Concerns about artificial intelligence, or AI, are plaguing U.S. workers, according to a new American Psychological Association poll.

Some workers are uncomfortable with the way their employers are tracking them, while others worry that AI will make their jobs obsolete.

“Employers interested in investing in artificial intelligence systems...

There's an adage that in romantic relationships, opposites attract. Now, a large, new study confirms that just like many old sayings, it's wrong.

In an analysis of about 200 studies involving millions of couples, researchers came to the conclusion that there is little behind the claim that opposites attract. If anything, the one about birds of feather flocking together is much closer to t...

“Vain” isn’t a word normally associated with football players, but many wide receivers believe they look slim and fleet-footed with a lower number on their jersey rather than a higher one.

New research shows these players are onto something.

In two experiments, subjects shown images of players consistently said that those wearing jerseys numbered 10 to 19 looked thinner than t...

Just like adults, kids face daily stressors.

Luckily, a new study suggests that teaching them creative thinking can help them manage it all.

Researchers found that when school-age children learned some "narrative creativity" techniques -- such as shifting your perspective and imagining "what if" scenarios -- they quickly became better problem-solvers.

After a week-long creativ...

Being fit doesn’t just help your body -- it also helps your mind, a new study reports.

People in better physical condition appear to have less need for drugs to treat mood disorders, Norwegian researchers have found.

“We find that people who are in better shape fill fewer prescriptions for anxiety and depression medications,” said senior author

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • September 6, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • It’s not unusual to experience driving anxiety. Living in cities with heavy traffic, five-lane highways and little public transportation can make it even harder.

    A psychologist offers some suggestions for easing those fears.

    “One of the biggest challenges centers around anxiety related to the trigger, and that can be exacerbated by a variety of things like weather, traffic or c...

    It can be hard for new college students, or those returning after summer break, to be away from home.

    Homesickness is a normal reaction. About 30% of all students and 70% of first-year students experience it. Though it can happen at any time, it’s most common in the first few months away.

    Float therapy, where a patient is suspended in a pool of warm, salty water in a soundproof room, could help ease some aspects of anorexia nervosa, a small new study found.

    “The idea is that women with anorexia have dysfunctional interoceptive abilities [sensing internal signals from your body], so they're not able to attend to and perceive their bodily experiences in the same way that ...

    Most fathers experience a decline in relationship satisfaction that can last for years after the baby is born, new research shows.

    “A good couple relationship during the transition to parenthood is important for parents' mental health, involvement in parenting and bonding, as well as child development,” said lead author

    If a loved one were living with addiction, a majority of Americans say they would know how to get help.

    About 71% of 2,200 respondents to an American Psychiatric Association poll said they would know how to assist a friend or family members.

    Most, about 73%, would refer that loved one to treatment, and 74% would talk to them about their addiction.

    "It’s promising, especiall...

    It’s become more common for people to share mental health struggles on social media, but that decision could have a negative impact on future employment.

    Potential employers view job candidates differently if they talk about their personal mental health publicly, a new study finds.

    “People are often encouraged to discuss their mental health struggles on social media with the goa...

    When the pandemic began, spending on mental health services skyrocketed and it continues to rise even as use of telehealth services leveled off.

    That's the key takeaway from a new study published Aug. 25 in JAMA Health Forum.

    Some rule...

    With 2023 predicted to be the hottest year on record, a new study is pointing to another potential consequence of heat waves: faster declines in older adults' memory and thinking skills.

    The study, of nearly 9,500 older U.S. adults, found that those with greater exposure to heat waves over 12 year...

    Young people have high levels of distress about climate change, and a new study argues that their anguish could be key to fighting it.

    “People of all ages are being affected by the climate crisis. Young people in particular, though, will live through more of the unfolding hazards of the climate crisis than older generations,” said researcher

  • Sarah D. Collins HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 23, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Millions of Americans who experience major depression will suffer a relapse, but a new study suggests that learning to focus on the positive, rather than the negatives in everyday life, might help reduce those odds.

    “What we started to realize is it’s not just about how people with depression process negative information but there’s something interesting about how they process ...

    The brain is a complex organ, and a new study — believed to be the largest ever on the brain’s genetics — identifies more than 4,000 genetic variants linked to brain structure.

    The research, involving some 36,000 brain scans, was led by a team at the University of Cambridge in England.

    Brains are quite varied in terms of overall volume, how the brain is folded and how thick th...

    America's emergency rooms are being flooded by children suffering from psychiatric emergencies like anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts or attempts, a new joint report from three leading medical associations warns.

    This surge in pediatric mental health emergencies has overwhelmed ERs in the United States, says the joint paper from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American ...

    “She's cheer captain and I'm on the bleachers,” Taylor Swift laments to her popular crush in the song “You Belong With Me.”

    The lyrics of longing to fit in at school reflect an old trope re-confirmed by a new study that compared teens in the United States and Lithu...

    Punishing heat is a fact of life inside America's prisons without air conditioning, and it is taking a serious toll on prisoners' mental health.

    When the outside thermometer hits 90 degrees Fahrenheit or more, a new study shows that prison suicide risk jumps 36%, in comparison to when temperatures are in the 60s.

    The finding comes from a look at the Louisiana prison system, one of ...

    Modern antidepressants could be effective for long-term treatment of some patients with bipolar disorder, a new trial suggests.

    Current guidelines discourage use of antidepressants in these patients, over concerns that the drugs will trigger a manic episode.

    But bipolar patients who remained on antidepressants for a whole year had fewer mood episodes than those who were switched to ...

    A large new study challenges the long-held idea that depression makes people more vulnerable to cancer, finding no association between the mental health condition and most types of cancer.

    The study, of more than 300,000 adults, found that neither depression nor chronic anxiety were linked to increased odds of developing cancer in the coming years. And when researchers looked at specific ...

    It seems obvious that texting and walking can be a dangerous duo, but now a new Australian study offers solid evidence of the dangers.

    Emergency room doctors Dr. Michael Levine and Dr. M...

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a new pill, called zuranolone, that may quickly ease severe postpartum depression and help millions of women regain their emotional equilibrium following childbirth.

    Taken as a pill once a day for two weeks, zuranolone (Zurzuvae) showed “rapid, significant and sustained” reductions in depressive symptoms when compared to a place...

    Workers may sense it intuitively but their mouse clicks prove it: Friday afternoon is the least productive time of the work week.

    It's also when workers make the most typos.

    A Texas A&M University team studied this using the computer usage metrics of 789 in-office employees at a large energy company over two years.

    “Most studies of worker productivity use employee self-repor...

    Ever feel like your job is pointless?

    A big part of the population feels just that way — that the jobs they do matter little to society.

    And a Swiss study that delved into what's been dubbed the "bullshit jobs theory" found that feeling was especially likely for ...

    When studying which personality types were more likely to resist getting vaccines, researchers got a surprise.

    It was the extroverts who were more vaccine resistant. Compared to other personality styles, extroverts were 18% more likely to refuse the COVID-19 vaccine, the new study finds.

    “We expected that people who were especially high in extroversion would be more likely to ge...

    The trauma and unhappy family dynamics of childhood may follow kids into old age, affecting both their mind and body, according to new research.

    “We looked at self-reported disability, as well as objectively measured physical and cognitive impairment, and learned that early-life stressful experiences can have ramifications all the way into older age,” said senior author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 4, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • All eyes are on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week as the agency weighs approval of a new pill that may quickly treat and ease severe postpartum depression.

    Approval of the drug could help millions of women regain their emotional equilibrium following childbirth. The FDA's decision is expected by Friday.

    Taken as a pill once a day for two weeks, zuranolone showed “ra...

    Being exposed to lead while in the womb or during early childhood may increase a person's chance of engaging in criminal behavior as an adult, a new review claims.

    To arrive at this conclusion, the review authors evaluated 17 previous studies that used varying methods to test for lead exposure, including blood, bones and teeth. They also addressed the effects of exposure at different ages...

    One dose of the hallucinogenic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may help some people with anorexia move past their preoccupation with body image, an early study suggests.

    The study, of just 10 women with anorexia, tested the effects of a single dose of psilocybin plus psychological counseling sessions.

    Researchers found that the treatment appeared safe, with patients rating the exper...

    After the death of a parent, boys may have a tougher time than girls, a new study suggests.

    Young people who lose a parent before age 21 are at risk for poor mental health, lower income and unemployment in adulthood. Researchers say boys seem to be harder hit.

    The study was published July 25 in the

    When parents meet U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, one concern comes up time after time.

    "The most common question parents ask me is: 'Is social media safe for my kids,' " Murthy said. "The answer is that we don't have enough evidence to say it's safe, and in fact, there is...

    Summer jobs can give teens valuable life experience that help them transition to adulthood -- not just a paycheck, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Benefits of summer jobs include:

    • Career exploration: Summer jobs and internships help high school students explore different careers that might interest them. They also provide opportunities to netwo...

    As kids prepare to return to school, a new poll warns that the many children who found the last school year challenging are likely to be apprehensive this time around.

    The online survey, conducted by the Harris Poll on behalf of the nonprofit On Our Sleeves Movement for Children's Mental Health, found that 71% of American parents say their children experienced challenges last school year....

    While the record-breaking heat the United States is experiencing this summer can stress people to their limits, it can be particularly hard to navigate for those with mental health issues.

    "All mental illnesses increase with heat because it results in more fatigue, irritability and anxiety, and it can exacerbate depressive episodes," said

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • July 27, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that his administration is seeking new rules to push insurance companies to increase coverage of mental health treatment.

    The new rules, which still must go through a public comment period, would require insurers to study if customers have the same medical and mental health benefits and fix any disparities if they don't.

    "You know, we can all ag...

    The national 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline has hit its one-year anniversary, and it appears that the public is increasingly turning to the number in times of darkness.

    The most recent statistics show a substantial increase in call volume, with nearly 160,000 more crisis calls, chats and texts in May 2023 compared to May 2022 -- two months before 988's activation on July 16.

    Compared...

    It's commonly thought that having a companion animal — be it a dog, cat or bird — is good for the owner's mental health.

    A new study suggests that's not so, at least for people with severe mental illness and for pets that aren't trained therapy animals. Pets may, however, be an important part of the social network for folks with severe mental illness.

    Having pets was not signifi...

    Depression, suicidal thoughts and other mental health problems sent record numbers of American kids, especially girls, to emergency rooms during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Once there, many waited days or even weeks to be admitted to the hospital, a new study reports.

    "The system was already stretched to begin with and then the pandemic hit and more people were seeking care," said senior...

    Show All Health News Results