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It sounds easy, but standing on one leg for 10 seconds can be harder than you think.

And your ability to do so — or not — may predict whether you are more likely to die within the next decade, a new study suggests. That's why an international team of researchers says the 10-second test should be part of routine health checks f...

Keeping your body well-fueled and hydrated is a must during outdoor summer sports and exercise, a nutrition expert says.

"For summer workouts, it's important to make sure that adequate carbohydrates, fluids and electrolytes are consumed," said sports dietitian Kristen Chang, assistant director of the master's program in nutrition and dietetics at Virginia Tech University.

"You need...

It's a good idea to get children outside every day, but especially on Kids to Parks Day, a national day of outdoor play on May 21.

"Even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, outdoor time and nature exploration are safe for most kids," pediatrician Dr. Danette Glassy said in an ...

It's never too late to start exercising -- and the right activities might help you stay independent in your home.

While building healthy habits at an earlier age can have some long-term benefits, adding physical activity can help at all ages, new research suggests.

A new study found that physically frail elderly people with low muscle mass (sarcopenia) were able to reduce their leve...

Rates of childhood obesity in the United States are soaring, and new research suggests child care programs may be part of the problem.

Most tots in these programs aren't getting nearly enough exercise.

National guidance for child care programs calls for providing at least two opportunities a day for physical activity, totaling 60 to 90 minutes. While the new study found that 74% of ...

People who've had a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be at increased risk for dementia, according to a new study.

"Approximately 1 in 10 people in our study who had major TBI did develop dementia," said study co-author Dr. Rahul Raj, ...

As youth spring sports kick into high gear, it's important to know about injury prevention and treatment, an expert says.

Injury risks and preventive measures can vary by sport, according to Dr. Marcus Knox, a physical therapist in the department of orthopedic surgery at B...

Exercise may help safeguard your brain as you age, and a new study suggests how this might happen.

Previous research has shown that physical activity helps protect brain cells. This paper indicates it may do that through lower levels of insulin and body fat.

"These results may help us to understand how physical activity affects brain health, which may guide us in developing strategi...

Staving off Alzheimer's disease might just take a healthy diet, exercise and an active mind, a new study suggests.

Women and men who follow a healthy lifestyle live longer — and longer without Alzheimer's or other dementias, researchers say.

"Eating a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2022
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  • By now, most people have heard that exercise is good for their health.

    A new review suggests it can it also make a difference in major depressive disorder.

    Researchers analyzed 15 existing studies with data on exercise and depression, finding an association between physical activity and...

    Sitting tai chi provides stroke survivors with recovery benefits similar to those achieved with standard rehabilitation, a new study finds.

    Tai chi involves a series of slow movements of the han...

    Taking a stroll through a city park can give your mood a significant boost, but parks in some cities provide a bigger benefit than those in others, researchers say.

    In a new study, investigators measured the

    Most people who have had major foot surgery are able to return to the activities they enjoy, but it may take a long time, new research suggests.

    The study included 82 adult patients who had surgery to correct a form of "

  • Consumer news
  • Robert Preidt
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  • March 25, 2022
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  • A healthy diet and regular exercise are crucial for the long-term health of cancer survivors, a new American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline emphasizes.

    "The link to a healthy diet and regular exercise in long-term cancer survival has become even more clear during the last several years," said Dr...

    A fresh review of recent government surveys suggests the well-being of 73 million American kids is under strain and seems to be getting worse.

    The upshot: anxiety,

    Just a bit of exercise can help keep your brain in shape as you age, according to the latest study that shows how physical activity can benefit older minds.

    "This finding isn't saying, 'If you're older, you need to go out there and start running marathons,'" said lead author Marissa Gogniat, a recent doctoral graduate in psychology from the University of Georgia.

    "This is saying if ...

    About one-quarter of Americans say they made positive changes to their daily habits during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll shows.

    As U.S. states ended masking mandates and infection numbers dropped this year, most (64%) respondents said their mood had been stable since January and that the ...

    People tend to have a specific image when they think of eating disorders -- a disturbingly skinny white girl with reed-thin arms, her ribs and shoulder blades prominent.

    You don't think of a ripped, beefy muscle man chugging a protein shake and fretting about carbs between weightlifting sessions. But maybe you should.

    Men and some minority groups have been drastically underrepresent...

    Want to preserve all those precious memories, including your first kiss and how you felt the first time you got behind the wheel of a car?

    If you do, start moving: New research shows that when sedentary older adults started to exercise, they showed improvements in episodic memory, or the ability to vividly recall meaningful moments and events.

    These benefits were most pronounced amo...

    Here are some numbers that could add up strongly in your favor.

    If you're in your 70s and get 20 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous exercise, you may ward off heart disease in your 80s, new Italian research suggests.

    In the study ...

    Worried that a COVID-19 vaccine might hamper your workout? New research suggests you can hit the gym with minimal effects.

    In a study of 18 healthy people who received a COVID-19 vaccine, the participants were monitored while they did cycling workouts before and two to three weeks after being fully vaccinated.

    The researchers also conducted exercise tests in a cont...

    Got dry, itchy eyes?

    Working out might help, a new study suggests.

    "Instead of having to use eye drops or other alternative treatments, our study aimed to determine if remaining physically active can be an effective preventative measure against dryness," said study co-author Heinz ...

    Alan Holman didn't stop exercising when told he had cancer, and he's glad of it, now that U.K. researchers say moderate exercise may improve chemotherapy outcomes in esophageal cancer patients.

    Holman, 70, was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in December 2016, shortly after retiring from his job as a facilities manager at a shopping mall in Britain. Like many patients, he underwent

    Worried about losing your mental faculties as you age? Get out there and exercise, new research suggests.

    Physical activity helps keep the aging brain sharp, according to the latest of many studies showing a link between exercise and brain health.

    This study included 90 adults, ages 50-74, who wore devices to measure their levels of

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 3, 2022
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  • With America's best skiers, skaters and snowboarders now heading to the Winter Olympics, a team of mental health professionals will be in Beijing to help them perform under the double strain of intense competition and a pandemic.

    One of those professionals is Dr. David Baron, provost of Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif. He'll enter the Olympic Village in Beijing as t...

    A return to non-contact physical activity three days after a concussion is safe and possibly even beneficial for kids, a Canadian clinical trial finds.

    "Gone are the days of resting in a dark room," said study co-author Andrée-Anne Ledoux, a scientist at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada.

    The

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 2, 2022
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  • Tempted to take your workout into the great outdoors?

    Be aware that there are both benefits and risks to exercising outdoors during the winter.

    “There’s actually some advantages to working out in cold weather -- with no heat and humidity to deal with you may ...

    Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

    If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

    "Our projections are based on an additional 10 minutes of moderate to vi...

    Support from family and friends, along with exercise and sufficient sleep, have helped protect teens' mental health during the pandemic, new research shows.

    The study also found that teen girls have been more likely than boys to suffer mental distress during the pandemic.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data gathered from more than 3,000 participants, aged 11 to 14, in the

    When older people cut back on physical activity, their risk of type 2 diabetes rises. But walking regularly can help, a new study suggests.

    The more steps you take -- and the more intensely you walk -- the lower your odds for type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

    To assess the link between walking and diabetes risk...

    Worrying can take a toll on your psyche, but new research suggests that when middle-aged men fret too much, they face a higher risk for developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke down the road.

    And this increase in risk is on par with the health risks linked to heavy drinking, the findings showed.

    <...

    When American kids do downhill skiing or snowboarding, they almost always wear a helmet, their parents say, but they're far less likely to do so when cruising down a neighborhood hill on a sled.

    That puts them at risk for serious head injuries, experts warn.

    “Because sledding is so common, parents may overloo...

    Your heart is in an incredibly vulnerable state if you've suffered a heart attack or are fighting heart failure, and cardiac rehabilitation could be an important part of your recovery.

    Unfortunately, not enough older folks appear to be taking advantage of this life-saving therapy.

    Fewer than one in 10 eligible Medicare beneficiaries get recommended heart failure rehab treatments, th...

    Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

    Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

    "Prolonged TV viewing, which involves immobilization, may increase the risk of venous thromboembolism,...

    Folks who've had a tough case of COVID-19 shouldn't hit the gym for basketball or an aerobics class without getting checked out by their doctor first, according to the American College for Sports Medicine.

    The disease wracks the body in ways that can be tough on athletes, especially if they develop

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • January 20, 2022
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  • Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    It's a familiar trope of TV and movies -- a couple is engaged in passionate sex when the guy's heart suddenly gives out.

    "Usually it's a middle-aged man. Usually he's cheating with somebody else. It's funny, there's this myth in our mind that this can happen," said cardiologist Dr. Martha Gulati, who refers to the concept as the "Hollywood heart attack."

    But ardor simply isn't that ...

    A few hours of exercise a week may help slow Parkinson's disease, even if it's just moderate activity such as walking or gardening, a new study suggests.

    The key is to be consistent, the researchers found.

    "Although medications can provide people with Parkinson's some symptom relief, they haven't been shown to slow the progression of the disease," said study author Dr. Kazuto Tsukit...

    Beating cancer is a huge feat, but how survivors live their lives afterwards also influences their longevity. A new study shows those who sit too much and are not physically active are much more likely to die early from cancer or any other cause than those who are more active.

    Data on c...

    Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

    Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

    "Synapses are...

    Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

    Now, new...

    It's clear that these last couple of years have been tough for a lot of people.

    So now that it’s the week when people make New Year’s resolutions, go easy on yourself.

    If you’d like to make a resolution, start small, the American Psychological Association (APA) suggests. By small, the goal should be one you think you can keep.

    For example, if you want to eat healthier...

    While some plastic surgeons recommend no exercise for weeks after breast augmentation, new research suggests the ban may not be necessary.

    A new clinical trial found that women who resumed exercise after one week off did not have more complicati...

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    This time of year can be hard on the heart.

    The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

    "The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

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  • December 12, 2021
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  • Regular physical activity has all sorts of benefits, and now researchers say it may help ward off serious pneumonia.

    Until now, it wasn't clear how exercise affected the risk of pneumonia, an infection of the lung tissue usually caused by bacteria or viruses. To find out, researchers ana...

    Dirty air could cancel out some of the brain benefits of exercise, a new study suggests.

    "Physical activity is associated with improved markers of brain health in areas with lower air pollution," said study author Melissa Furlong. "However, some beneficial effects essentially disappeared for vigorous physical activity in areas with the highest levels of air pollution." Furlong is an envi...

    College students are not bouncing back from the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, a troubling new study finds.

    Researchers were surprised to find that one year after the start of the pandemic, college students were still less active and more at risk for depression even as social restrictions were lifted and many were vaccinated.

    While the new study focused on the experien...

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