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Results for search "Exercise: Misc.".

Health News Results - 422

Pilates exercises can do more than help strengthen your abs -- the moves may also lower high blood pressure and reduce artery stiffness, new research suggests.

Pilates is a workout program that focuses on core strength, flexibility, body posture and controlled breathing.

The new study included 28 obese women, aged 19 to 27, with high blood pressure ("hypertension"). The part...

Even as government officials warn us to "stay home, stay safe" during the coronavirus pandemic, people are flocking to parks, trails and sidewalks to walk and bike away their cabin fever.

That might seem like a total contradiction. But according to health experts, it can be a healthy choice – as long as you exercise caution while exercising outdoors.

"Since most peop...

If you have high blood pressure, you can take steps to lower it by walking more every day, new research suggests.

In the study, researchers analyzed data from about 640 adults who participated in the Framingham Heart Study, which focuses on heart disease risk factors and has been ongoing for more than 70 years.

Participants were asked to wear smart watches that tracked the n...

For years, health experts have urged us to get off the couch and get moving. Now a new U.S. government study shows how much we stand to gain.

The study, of more 4,800 Americans age 40 and up, found a clear pattern: The more steps people took each day, the less likely they were to die over the next 10 years.

Those who managed at least 8,000 steps a day -- roughly equivalent t...

Exercise benefits prostate cancer patients who undergo hormone-reducing therapy, a small study suggests.

The treatment -- called androgen suppression therapy or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) -- uses drugs or surgery to reduce the level of androgen hormones, which prostate cancer cells typically require to multiply.

"The problem is ADT has several side effects, including...

Some people love to run no matter the season, even cold weather, and that is OK as long as you take proper precautions, a physical therapist says.

"It's up to the runner. As long as he or she is healthy, wearing appropriate attire and highly visible, the cold doesn't have to deter you from being outside," said Grace "Annie" Neurohr. She's a therapist and running specialist at Sinai Ho...

From weight loss to physical activity, lifestyle changes are effective, yet underused strategies to manage atrial fibrillation, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

Atrial fibrillation -- also known as a-fib or AF -- is an abnormal heart rhythm affecting more than 2.7 million Americans.

In a-fib, the heart's upper chambers beat ...

You've probably heard the phrase, "Sitting is the new smoking," but what is it about sitting that's so harmful?

New research suggests it's because sitting doesn't require much use of your body's muscles.

The study compared the daily activities of a modern-day African hunter-gatherer community called the Hadza, in Tanzania. It found that while the Hadza spent similar amount...

Kids get more calories from the snacks they eat after sports than they burn while playing, which could add up to thousands of extra calories a year, a new study warns.

"So many kids are at games just to get their treat afterwards, which really isn't helping to develop healthy habits long term," said senior study author Lori Spruance, an assistant professor of public health at Brigham ...

Take a walk, weed your garden, go for a swim or dance -- it could keep your brain from shrinking as you age, a new study suggests.

Being physically active may keep your brain four years younger than the rest of you, which might help prevent or slow the progression of dementias like Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

"We recently published a paper using information of bo...

Physical activity may help seniors live longer and healthier -- and exercise doesn't have to be intense, two new studies say.

"Finding a way to physically move more in an activity that suits your capabilities and is pleasurable is extremely important for all people, and especially for older people who may have risk factors for cardiovascular diseases," said Barry Franklin, past chair ...

For most people, aerobic exercise is great. However, high-intensity exercise like running in marathons and triathlons can pose heart risks for those who have inadequate training.

Sudden cardiac arrest, atrial fibrillation and heart attacks are among these risks, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

"Exercise is medicine, and ther...

Regular exercise can benefit black cancer survivors' physical and mental health, but most don't get the recommended amount of activity, a new study says.

Cancer survivors should get at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).

For most cancers, black patients have a higher risk of dying from their diseas...

Triathlons, rowing, mountaineering, cross-country skiing: Tough exercise like this done over decades appears to reshape the heart, new research shows.

In older adults, long-term endurance exercise seems tied to an enlargement of the aorta -- the large artery that carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body. But whether that change is beneficial or harmful remains u...

A spirited game of ping pong may be more than just fun: New research suggests it could quell symptoms in Parkinson's patients.

The small study found that patients with the movement disorder had significant improvements in a wide range of symptoms after taking part in a six-month ping pong exercise program.

"Ping pong, which is also called table tennis, is a form of aerobic e...

Do you ride your bike to work? If you don't, maybe you should.

Why? People who commute by bicycle are at lower risk of dying early, a new study from New Zealand finds.

Researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, the University of Melbourne and the University of Auckland found that those who cycled to work had a 13% reduction in death during the study period.

Very fit American adults enjoy a wider range of physical activities than those who are less active, a new study finds.

The findings could help point to ways to boost physical activity in adults, according to the researchers.

Data gathered from more than 9,800 adults nationwide between 2003 and 2006 showed that those who were active had done at least two different activities...

Smartphones appear to be more effective than wearable fitness devices in helping doctors track patients' physical activity, researchers say.

Their new study included 500 patients who joined activity tracking programs at two Philadelphia hospitals. Half used a smartphone app to track their daily steps after leaving the hospital. The other half used a wearable device.

Patient...

Hitting the slopes or the skating rink as the winter of 2020 winds down? Don't let an accident or injury spoil your fun.

"Winter sports and recreational activities have great health and cardiovascular benefits," said Dr. Joseph Bosco, vice president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). "However, it's important not to underestimate the risks that cold weather can br...

Love to cross-country ski? Well, all those days spent striding across the snow-covered wilderness may do more than keep you in great physical shape.

Swedish researchers report that very fit long-distance skiers were about 30% less likely to develop Parkinson's disease during their 20-year study.

The research suggests that any activity that keeps you fit might buffer the...

Changing up the amount of weight they lift could help weightlifters get stronger with less effort, a new study suggests.

In traditional weight training -- called one rep max -- the maximum weight an athlete can lift dictates the weight load for all sessions.

This study compared one rep max with an approach called load velocity profile, in which athletes lift varying weights ...

Most folks know that being a couch potato is bad for their health, but new research suggests that women who spend hours in their chairs and sofas might face greater risks than believed.

Sitting for long periods of time can increase risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, particularly if those bouts of sitting aren't broken up by occasionally getting up and stretching, the study f...

Gyms are bustling with regulars and resolutioners, all working up a sweat. But what's the secret to an easy, effective workout? It may be in the music.

A new study found that listening to music at a higher tempo reduces the perceived effort of exercise. For endurance exercises, such as walking on a treadmill, the effects were greatest.

"We found that listening to high-tempo mu...

Grab your golf clubs. Spending a day on the green at least once a month may lower the risk of early death among older adults, a new study finds.

About 25 million Americans play golf, which is a sport that can reduce stress and yield exercise benefits. Social in nature and played at a controlled pace, people often continue enjoying the sport into old age.

"Our study is perha...

Getting your surly teens off the couch might trigger a long-term turnaround in their moods, new research suggests.

"Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of depression by age 18," said study author Aaron Kandola, a psychiatry Ph.D. student at University College London (UCL).

"We found ...

Some people let healthy habits fall by the wayside after they start medications for high cholesterol or high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Of more than 41,000 middle-aged Finnish adults researchers followed, those who started on cholesterol or blood pressure drugs were more likely to stop exercising or gain weight in the years afterward.

The pattern does not prove that ...

Most people take the ability to move for granted, but not Kathy Miska.

Miska has had multiple sclerosis for two decades now, and her ability to get around has deteriorated steadily.

Now, a new robotic exoskeleton is giving her an opportunity to regain some of the mobility she's lost to the degenerative nerve disease.

"You can definitely tell when you get out of the suit....

People with an eating disorder are much more likely to have exercise addiction than those with normal eating habits, British researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 2,100 people who took part in nine studies in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and Italy.

People with an eating disorder were 3.7 times more likely to have an exercise addiction than those ...

This flu season arrived early and hit children hard, but experts say you can dodge the flu by boosting your immune system.

How? By living a healthy lifestyle and getting sufficient sleep, according to experts from Purdue University's School of Nursing, in West Lafayette, Ind.

So far, nearly 13 million flu cases have been diagnosed this season in the United States, while 39 c...

It might be the last thing you want to do when you are battling a cold, but exercise might actually make you feel better, suggests one health expert.

Here's why: Physical activity boosts your heart rate and promotes healthy blood flow, and it also opens up your lungs and releases endorphins, said Dr. Jayson Loeffert, a sports medicine physician at Penn State Health in Hershey, Pa.

Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

"Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much...

The benefits of exercise are well-known, but what if you're not able to take a brisk walk or endure a punishing workout?

Luckily for you, scientists have identified a protein they think might one day help prevent muscle decline in seniors and people who are immobile.

Sestrin, the protein, accumulates naturally in muscle after exercise. The researchers decided to find out mor...

Women who exercise throughout life may keep their muscle power as they age, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., examined muscle strength, power and the size and type of muscle fibers in the thighs of three groups of women.

Seven women in one group were over 70 and had exercised regularly for nearly 50 years. The seco...

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

A new study suggests that genetics is not destiny when it comes to your odds of becoming obese.

For years, research into "obesity genes" has led many Americans to believe that their DNA makes becoming overweight and obese inevitable.

But the new study shows that daily lifestyle -- not genes -- probably plays the much bigger role.

The study tracked data on more tha...

Gymgoers who've accidentally left their headphones at home might be all too familiar with this frustrating feeling: Exercising without music is a much harder go.

And now a broad new review of nearly 140 studies -- the first of its kind -- suggests there's real science to back that up, with clear evidence that music not only makes exercise seem easier and more enjoyable but actually re...

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

You made your resolution -- this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn't even last a day. Maybe next year?

But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you concentrated on making healthy changes every Monday? That way, if you slip up and dive ...

Pilates is an excellent exercise discipline that develops strength and agility, and you don't need to take formal classes or use Pilates machines to get its benefits. Using a stability ball with floor exercises is tailor made to target your core -- the muscles of your abdomen.

Here are three to try from the American Council on Exercise. Note: Choose a ball between 7 inches and 10 inc...

If you plan to make a New Year's resolution about improving your health, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some good suggestions.

"With too many holiday sweets and not enough exercise likely in the rearview mirror, now is the perfect time to consider your personal goals and how you can make positive health choices in the coming year," AMA President Dr. Patrice Harris said in ...

Leave your car in the garage if you can: A new study suggests that walking or biking to work could cut your risk of a heart attack.

The researchers analyzed 2011 data from 43 million working adults in England and found that 11.4% were active commuters, with 8.6% walking to work and 2.8% cycling to work.

In areas where walking or cyclin...

Exercise may reduce the odds you'll develop any of seven types of cancer -- and a new study suggests the more you exercise, the lower your risk.

That's the conclusion of researchers who pooled data from nine published studies that included more than 750,000 men and women.

"We found that the recommended amount of physical activity was in fact associated with significantly r...

Bad balance is a common cause of dangerous falls, especially among older adults. Falls send more than 2 million adults to the emergency room every year and often result in lengthy rehab stays.

Preventing falls is a priority for staying healthy and preventing painful broken bones as you age. Easy strength and balance exercises that you can do anytime, anywhere, such as tai chi and yoga...

It's hard to escape all the fanfare surrounding HIIT, or high-intensity interval training, which prevents plateaus by keeping your body at your max heart rate for very short intervals.

But another training approach called steady-state training, or SST, may be just as important, if not more so, depending on what you're trying to accomplish.

Steady-state training is the oppos...

If you travel a lot for business or pleasure, you may think that the most exercise possible is lugging your bags in and out of a car or through an airport. But it's important to get in real exercise even when you're away from home.

If you're a business road-tripper, look for snippets of time to move those muscles, like when you stop for gas. Any bodyweight calisthenics will do. Think:...

Regular exercise reduces heart risk factors in overweight and obese kids, researchers report.

Their study included 175 inactive boys and girls, aged 8 to 11, who took part in afterschool programs.

All of them did homework for about a half-hour and had a healthy snack. Some were randomly selected to do instructor-led physical activity such as jumping rope and playing tag for ...

Would you change your grocery list if a food label said "Walk an hour to burn off the calories in this product"?

That's the idea behind a new push to include food labeling that describes the amount of exercise needed to burn off calories consumed, the researchers behind a new study said.

This labeling approach "is a simple strategy that could be easily included on food/bever...

Playing sports may improve the brain's ability to process sounds, a finding that could lead to new therapies for people who struggle with hearing, researchers report.

"No one would argue against the fact that sports lead to better physical fitness, but we don't always think of brain fitness and sports," said study senior author Nina Kraus. She's a professor of communication sciences a...

If you can tackle a tough workout, that may bode well for your longevity, new research suggests.

A woman's risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other causes is much lower if she can engage in vigorous exercise, scientists report.

The new study included more than 4,700 middle-aged and older women, average age 64, who were referred for treadmill exercise echocardiograph...

A healthy lifestyle might be your best defense against cancer, an expert says.

About 42% of cancer cases and 45% of cancer deaths are attributable to modifiable risk factors, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Modifiable risk factors are behaviors within one's control, such as eating right, not smoking, and being physically active," said Dr. Michael Hall, cha...

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