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Results for search "Love / Sex / Relationships: Misc.".

15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

28 Apr

Better Sleep May Mean More Sex for Women

On the other hand, researchers say poor quality sleep appears to increase the risk of female sexual problems.

Health News Results - 84

Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for a long time while studying relationship initiation.

"We s...

Marriages can remain stable after something as challenging as a brain injury for one of the spouses, new research indicates.

Though past reports have suggested that divorce rates were high among those who experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI), that was not true for most people in the current study.

"Our data dispel myths about risk of divorce after TBI and suggest a message of ...

Job stress, money problems and other everyday frustrations can undermine relationships, but big challenges like the coronavirus pandemic may actually leave couples happier, a new study reveals.

The reason: They're more likely to be aware that stress is affecting them.

"Because of this awareness, when major stressors occur, romantic partners may be less likely to blame each other for...

Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free -- and they're happy that way.

The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of parents or people who planned to have children.

On one h...

When young adults are seeking a casual dating relationship, drinking is likely to follow, new research suggests.

Meanwhile, those who are already in a serious relationship are likely to drink less.

The study included more than 700 people in the Seattle area, aged 18 to 25, who filled out surveys every month for two years. The study used a community sample that was not limited to col...

More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Although our analyses demonstrated that t...

Adults with autism report a broad range of sexuality -- being much more likely to identify as asexual, bisexual or homosexual than people without autism, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 2,400 adults, researchers found that those with autism were three to nine times more likely to identify as homosexual, asexual or "other."

Among men, those with autism were over three times ...

You might think regret has an upside -- to help you avoid repeating a mistake -- but new research shows it's just not so, especially when it comes to casual sex.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology asked volunteers to fill out a questionnaire about sexual regret -- twice, about 4½ months apart.

"For the most part, people continue with the same sexual...

Valentine's Day is Sunday and even amid a pandemic the search for love continues. When dating, will potential suitors think you're a prince or a frog?

That may depend on how genuinely happy you are with yourself and how well you present yourself, new research shows.

The new study from McGill University says first impressions during a first date can accurately assess another pe...

Could a cancer diagnosis sometimes produce positive life changes? In a new study, many people with colon cancer, even in advanced stages, believed their diagnosis had brought some beneficial effects to their lives.

In surveys of 133 colon cancer patients, researchers found that nearly all -- 95% -- said their lives had benefited in some way since their diagnosis. Often, they felt their f...

Tinder, Grindrand other dating apps have a reputation for encouraging casual hookups, but a new study suggests app users may be looking for -- and finding -- love in all the right places after all.

Unlike more traditional dating sites such as Match.com and EHarmony, these apps are largely based on rating photos. You swipe right if you like what you see, or left if you don't. It's that si...

The holiday season can be difficult for people with cancer, especially with the added stress of the COVID-19 pandemic this year.

As they undergo treatment and cope with symptoms and side effects, they may struggle to get any pleasure from the season, according to the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

Emotional and physical fatigue can make it hard for cancer patients to take p...

Couples going through a divorce may see their mental well-being deteriorate -- especially if they are having angry exchanges and other conflicts, a new study shows.

The findings are no surprise, experts said. But the study appears to be the first to capture how married people fare in the midst of a split, rather than after a period of separation.

And overall, both men and women repo...

Greater reproductive rights for women -- such as access to sex education and birth control -- are associated with lower rates of low birth weight babies, a new study finds.

Reproductive rights refer to a woman's right to plan motherhood. This includes use of birth control or abortion, access to reproductive health services and sex ed in the public schools.

"Our study provi...

It's often thought that older women lose interest in sex, but many women continue to rate sex as important, a new study finds.

"In contrast to prior literature reporting that the importance of sex decreases as women move through midlife, we found that for a quarter of women, sex remains highly important to them throughout midlife," said lead author Dr. Holly Thomas, an assistant prof...

As the coronavirus pandemic wears on, it's clear that not everyone's on the same page when it comes to preventing the risk of infection.

Lots of people wear masks, try to maintain social distancing and avoid large gatherings. But plenty of others forgo a mask or wear it on their chin, go to busy bars and attend social gatherings, like weddings.

Both sides think they're righ...

Cyberbullying is less common among teens who feel loved and supported by their parents, new research shows.

The findings could be especially relevant during the coronavirus pandemic, say a team from New York University.

"With remote learning replacing classroom instruction for many young people, and cellphones and social media standing in for face-to-face interaction with fr...

Researchers say a new test can tell which patients with gonorrhea will benefit from treatment with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

The low-cost drug has been out of use amid concern that the bacterium that causes gonorrhea was becoming resistant to it.

In this study, 106 patients identified as having a gonorrhea strain called wild-type gyrA serine were cured with a single dos...

Nearly half of U.S. teens have been stalked or harassed by a partner or done the deed themselves, a new study finds.

"These victimization and perpetration numbers are unacceptably high," said study author Emily Rothman, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University's School of Public Health.

"Unfortunately, they are in line with estimates of similar problems ...

As many as 40% of LGBTQ youth and more than half of transgender and nonbinary youth contemplated taking their life in the past year, according to a new report.

Also, one in three LGBTQ youth said they had been threatened or harmed because of their sexual identity, researchers from the nonprofit Trevor Project found in their 2020 National Survey on LGBTQ Youth Mental Health.

...

About one-third of people prescribed drugs to prevent HIV stopped taking the medications when they were forced to stay home due to the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey finds. The reason, they said: They weren't having sex.

Many discontinued the drugs without their doctor's say-so, which has experts concerned.

"Reducing the number of new HIV transmissions and ensuring acces...

Happy couples apparently make good bedfellows. New research says that when happy couples sleep together, they tend to have more -- and less disrupted -- rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

The REM phase of sleep is when you dream, and it's been linked to emotion regulation, memory consolidation and creative problem-solving, the researchers said.

"There is -- even in the medica...

Will the stay-at-home orders issued in March and April result in a "coronavirus baby boom," as some have predicted?

Perhaps not, according to a new survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults, conducted by researchers from Indiana University.

Around half of the people questioned reported no change in their sex lives during the early part of the coronavirus quarantine from mid-Mar...

Being lonely may make it harder to quit smoking, a new British study suggests.

Using genetic and survey data from hundreds of thousands of people, researchers found that loneliness makes it more likely that someone will smoke. This type of analysis is called Mendelian randomization.

"This method has never been applied to this question before and so the results are novel, b...

Back off, Mom and Dad: Teens who feel their parents are overly controlling may have more difficulty with romantic relationships as adults, a new study suggests.

The study, which followed 184 teens, found that those with domineering parents had a future that was different from their peers: On average, they did not go as far in their education, and they were less likely to be in a roman...

Sex, and lots of it, has long been the primary preoccupation of young adults, but more of them are now going months and years without any intimate encounters.

New research shows that one of three men between the ages of 18 to 24 have not had any sex during the past year, putting to rest all the talk of the "hookup culture."

Men and women aged 25 to 34 in the United States al...

As U.S. states issued stay-at-home orders in March and April, one of many questions was how couples would fare under lockdown together. Now a new survey offers an initial snapshot: some more arguments, regular declarations of love, and a good dose of same-old, same-old.

The survey included close to 2,300 U.S. adults who were living with their partner when the pandemic hit -- forcing m...

A little romance may go a long way toward helping breast cancer survivors thrive.

New research showed that a strong romantic relationship wasn't the cure-all, but it was linked to lower psychological stress and lower inflammation, which is a key to staying healthy.

"It's important for survivors, when they're going through this uncertain time, to feel comfortable with their ...

People have certain qualities they look for in a mate, and now a new study finds that a woman's eggs may be choosy about sperm, too.

Researchers said the findings offer new insight into human reproduction -- showing that eggs will not accept just any sperm, and actually have more say in the union than previously recognized.

In the moments just before fertilization, there is ...

Love to cuddle up? It might bring a 'mind meld,' too, new research shows.

People in close physical contact appear to have synchronized brain patterns, a revolutionary new MRI technique has revealed.

A functional MRI scan of two people cuddling under a blanket showed that their brains appeared to be falling into similar patterns of action and response, as they took turns gent...

It wouldn't be Mother's Day without flowers and a messy breakfast in bed. But is there more we can do for mom's long-term benefit, and perhaps even for motherhood in general?

There surely is, experts say, and it doesn't have to cost a lot of money. As May 10 approaches, here are a few things to keep in mind.

"My kids are always asking me what they should do for Mother's Day," sa...

With most Americans weeks into sheltering-in-place, couples are in a situation probably none ever planned for: Being in each other's faces all day, every day -- with no clear end in sight.

Experts say the new closeness is likely playing out in many ways: Some couples will find they enjoy the extra time with each other; others will be counting the days until they can be with a human ot...

Sexual health programs appear to help increase condom use and abstinence among black American teens, researchers say.

They analyzed data from 29 studies that examined the effect of school- and community-based programs on nearly 12,000 teens.

"We focused on black adolescents because they face greater health disparities when it comes to the risk of unplanned pregnancy and cont...

Lesbian, gay and bisexual teens are far more likely than their straight peers to suffer physical and/or sexual violence, new research warns.

The warning stems from surveys of nearly 29,000 teens, aged 14 to 18, conducted in 2015 and 2017 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Overall, LGBQ teens (lesbian, gay, bisexual and teens who are questioning their se...

Many U.S. teenagers may be using their smartphones to harass, humiliate or otherwise abuse their dating partners.

That's according to a recent national survey of teens who'd been in a romantic relationship in the past year. Researchers found that 28% had been victims of "digital dating abuse" -- surprisingly, with boys being targets more often than girls.

While teen dati...

You need to work on your relationship with your significant other all year round, not just on Valentine's Day, a relationship expert advises.

There are five key things you can do to keep your relationship healthy, according to Frank Provenzano, an instructor in psychology and a clinical psychologist at Furman University, in Greenville, S.C.

Share one new thing with your p...

Valentine's Day is a great opportunity to shower your loved one with gifts, but some may do more harm than good.

"If you want to impress your beloved this year, take a pass on gifts that cause sneezing and wheezing," said allergist Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"Once you have an understanding of your vale...

Bedtime without your partner on Valentine's Day could make sleep elusive. But a new study suggests one remedy: Cuddling up with a piece of his or her clothing.

Researchers say having a loved one's natural scent nearby could be as effective a sleep aid as melatonin.

"One of the most surprising findings is how a romantic partner's scent can improve sleep quality even outside o...

Suicidal behavior is declining among U.S. teenagers who identify as LGBT, but the problem remains pervasive.

That's the conclusion of two new studies that tracked trends among U.S. teenagers over the past couple of decades. Over the years, more kids have been identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) -- and their likelihood of reporting suicidal thoughts and behavior...

Roses are red, violets are blue, sleep experts have a Valentine's Day gift idea for you.

A box of chocolates and a candlelight dinner might seem romantic, but your partner might also embrace a lifestyle change: no more snoring.

"While snoring is disruptive to bed partners and can cause frustration in a relationship, it can also be an indicator of a serious health problem," ...

Schools may strive to teach kids that sharing is caring, but a new study suggests that altruism begins in infancy and can be influenced by others.

It's been unclear when people start to display altruism, which can include sharing resources such as food with others in need.

"We think altruism is important to study because it is one of the most distinctive aspects of being hum...

Eighties rocker Huey Lewis was right: The power of love is a curious thing, and it might just save your life. Or at least make it longer and healthier.

Studies have shown supportive relationships in general and marriage in particular can be healthy for you.

A 2017 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association found unmarried people with heart disease were 5...

Could you imagine not being able to smell bacon frying, or freshly cut grass, or the presence of smoke?

People who lose their sense of smell face difficulties that can affect their daily lives and put their health and safety at risk, a new British study suggests.

It included 71 patients, ages 31 to 80, who lost their sense of smell. They reported a number of problems -- from...

So-called "locker-room talk" among boys can actually be used to promote respect toward girls, a new study reports.

Teenage boys are less likely to be abusive or sexually violent in a relationship after they've taken part in Coaching Boys Into Men, a prevention program delivered by athletic coaches as part of sports training, according to research results.

They're also more l...

Roughly 40% to 50% of married couples ultimately split up, according to theAmerican Psychological Association. But Northwestern University professor Eli Finkel says the best marriages are actually better than ever.

How do you keep your marriage from going from blissful to bust? The psychologist, who has extensively examined the history of marriage, offers three tips in his boo...

It may come as no surprise to some, but new research shows that taking care of family and keeping a mate are the most important things for folks worldwide.

Researchers surveyed more than 7,000 people in 27 countries about what motivates them. The study included people from a wide range of countries -- Australia and Bulgaria to Thailand and Uganda -- on all continents except Antarctica...

Romance was absolutely the last thing Gloria Duncan and Al Cappiello had on their minds when they became nursing home residents.

"When I got here, I felt almost like my life was over. I was a very active, social person. I was almost devastated," Gloria said.

But then she met Al, who asked Gloria to be his date at the "Seniors' Senior Prom."

Al said he had notice...

"Sexting" may sound salacious, but it isn't always about sex, a new study shows.

In fact, two-thirds of adults who send these sexually oriented text messages don't have sex in mind at all, the Texas Tech University researchers report.

Some sexting is about foreplay for sex later on. Sexting is also used for reassurance about the relationship. And sometimes it's done to scor...

It's not uncommon for a woman's sex life to slow down with age, but hormones aren't the only reason she might not be in the mood, a new study suggests.

Postmenopausal issues, such as vaginal dryness or pain during sex, definitely put a damper on a woman's desire. But just as often, it was issues with her partner that brought sexual activity to a halt.

"Low libido is commo...

There's a new reason to keep the peace this holiday season: Strained relationships with family may be worse for your health than trouble with a spouse or significant other, new research suggests.

Parents, siblings and extended family members appear to affect your well-being, even into middle age and beyond, the study found.

"Family relationships matter for health," said le...

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