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Health News Results - 431

Given a choice, seagulls prefer food that's been handled by humans, a new British study finds.

This suggests that the birds may watch you when deciding what to scavenge, according to the researchers.

"We wanted to find out if gulls are simply attracted by the sight of food, or if people's actions can draw gulls' attention towards an item," said study lead author Madeleine Go...

Most folks know that being a couch potato is bad for their health, but new research suggests that women who spend hours in their chairs and sofas might face greater risks than believed.

Sitting for long periods of time can increase risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, particularly if those bouts of sitting aren't broken up by occasionally getting up and stretching, the study f...

You need to work on your relationship with your significant other all year round, not just on Valentine's Day, a relationship expert advises.

There are five key things you can do to keep your relationship healthy, according to Frank Provenzano, an instructor in psychology and a clinical psychologist at Furman University, in Greenville, S.C.

Share one new thing with your p...

Ketamine use among electronic dance music party-goers is much higher than previously thought. And unintentional use appears to play a role, a new study finds.

Ketamine is known as Special K on the party scene. The operating room anesthetic was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2019 as a treatment for depression. But it has long been used as a club drug.

"I...

Having fewer liquor stores in cities may lead to lower murder rates, a new study suggests.

The implication of alcohol zoning regulations can have life-or-death consequences -- at least in Baltimore, according to study author Pamela Trangenstein, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"There is an ongoing violence epidemic in Baltimore, with recen...

Zoos that have large, well-known types of animals attract more visitors, which means more money for conservation, a new study finds.

Zoos and aquariums are among the leading sources of conservation funding and refuges for species with dwindling numbers in the wild.

"Our findings show that charismatic animals in the care of accredited zoos, and the visitors that come to see t...

Schools may strive to teach kids that sharing is caring, but a new study suggests that altruism begins in infancy and can be influenced by others.

It's been unclear when people start to display altruism, which can include sharing resources such as food with others in need.

"We think altruism is important to study because it is one of the most distinctive aspects of being hum...

Some people let healthy habits fall by the wayside after they start medications for high cholesterol or high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Of more than 41,000 middle-aged Finnish adults researchers followed, those who started on cholesterol or blood pressure drugs were more likely to stop exercising or gain weight in the years afterward.

The pattern does not prove that ...

Whether you're stopping at a casual fast-food place or sitting down to eat in a full-service restaurant, eating out is an easy way to fill up when you're hungry. But those meals may not deliver much nutritional value, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that 70% of fast-food meals consumed in the United States were of poor nutritional value. For full-service restaurants, ...

Students have better focus in class if teachers praise them for being good rather than scolding them for being bad, according to a new study.

Researchers spent three years observing more than 2,500 students in 19 elementary schools across Missouri, Tennessee and Utah. The children came from 151 classes from kindergarten through grade 6.

The students exhibited 20%-30% g...

Before you throw any leftovers away, heed new research that suggests the choice could hit you right in your pocketbook.

It turns out that almost one-third of food in American households goes to waste, costing each household thousands of dollars a year, researchers report.

"Our findings are consistent with previous studies, which have shown that 30% to 40% of the tot...

Young school-aged children with behavior problems may have different bacteria in their guts than their well-behaved peers, new research suggests.

The study also noted that parents may play a key role in development of the particular bacteria in their child's gut (collectively known as the microbiome). That role even extends beyond the type of foods parents give their children, resear...

There's more evidence that the canine-human bond is a tight one: New research finds that stray dogs pick up on human commands, even though they haven't been trained.

Of the untrained dogs in the study, 80% went to the place a person pointed to. This suggests dogs understand complex gestures by watching humans, which might be a clue to reducing conflict between stray dogs and peop...

If you can't quite bring yourself to declutter your home and toss out unneeded possessions, one reason why might surprise you.

Researchers say the emotional tug you feel might be loneliness.

"When consumers make decisions about how to get rid of multiple possessions, perhaps when they are moving, it is a time when they are likely to feel lonely," said Catherine Cole. She's a...

U.S. cancer survivors have surprisingly high rates of alcohol use, researchers say.

"This study highlights the prevalence of current alcohol use among cancer survivors, including an increase in alcohol intake over time and higher rates among younger cancer survivors," said Dr. Crystal Denlinger, chief of GI Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

"As al...

Learning how to control the urge to urinate may be all the therapy men need to treat an overactive bladder, a new study suggests.

A combination of drugs and behavioral therapy seems to work better than drugs alone, but behavioral therapy alone also worked better than drugs, the researchers found.

The trial of 204 men with overactive bladder suggests behavioral therapy may b...

The convenience and lower cost of processed foods is hard to resist. But ready-to-eat meals and snacks are making Americans obese and unhealthy, a new study suggests.

As more people eat cheaper processed foods, they are getting fatter, said researcher Leigh Frame, from George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Washington, D.C.

Frame and a colleague anal...

People who love their green tea may also enjoy longer, healthier lives, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that of more than 100,000 Chinese adults they tracked, those who drank green tea at least three times a week were less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke over the next seven years.

Tea lovers also had a slightly longer life expectancy. At age 50, they ...

Teenagers who've experimented with opioid painkillers are likely to be taking other health risks, a new study finds.

In a national survey of U.S. high school students, 14% said they had ever "misused" a prescription opioid such as Vicodin, OxyContin or Percocet. And those teenagers were much more likely than their peers to admit to taking a range of risks -- from abusing other dru...

You made your resolution -- this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn't even last a day. Maybe next year?

But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you concentrated on making healthy changes every Monday? That way, if you slip up and dive ...

Millions of Americans have filled movie theaters over the holidays to watch the latest in the Star Wars saga, but a new study suggests that enjoyment of the film may be governed by prior expectations.

To see how expectations affect viewing pleasure, researchers surveyed 441 people before and after they saw "Star Wars: Episode VIII -- The Last Jedi" in 2017.

Based on the resu...

Lose weight. Eat healthier. Quit smoking. These are all popular New Year's resolutions that are often only kept for a short time, if at all.

About 40% of Americans make a New Year's resolution, most of which are abandoned by February, according to researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

But Bernadette Melnyk, vice president for health promotion and c...

Electronic cigarettes are marketed as an aid to quitting smoking, but most young people who vape say that's not why they indulge.

Instead, six out of 10 said they vape to relax and they'd miss the stress relief of vaping if they quit, a new survey sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) shows.

"We're hearing this narrative that people are vaping to qui...

As electronic-cigarette use has soared among America's teens, so too has the number vaping marijuana, two new reports indicate.

A team from the University of Nebraska found youth use of pot in e-cigarettes rose from 11% in 2017 to 15% one year later. And University of Michigan researchers found that in 2019, 14% of 12th graders reported marijuana vaping in the prior month...

Children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to lag behind their peers long after they leave school, earning less as adults and living with their parents longer, a new study finds.

This is often true even if the hallmark symptoms of the disorder -- including inability to focus, hyperactivity, fidgetiness and impulsivity -- appear to have abated.

...

Would you change your grocery list if a food label said "Walk an hour to burn off the calories in this product"?

That's the idea behind a new push to include food labeling that describes the amount of exercise needed to burn off calories consumed, the researchers behind a new study said.

This labeling approach "is a simple strategy that could be easily included on food/bever...

Do you feel like you know why you're here?

The answer to that question could determine how you feel day-to-day.

If you've found meaning in your life, you're more likely to be both physically and mentally healthy, a new study reports.

On the other hand, people restlessly searching for meaning in their life are more likely to have worse mental well-being, with their ...

Know any folks who are just too full of themselves? Rest assured: They'll probably get over it eventually.

That's because narcissism tends to decline with age, according to what researchers described as the longest study ever of the personality disorder.

For the study, a Michigan State University team looked at nearly 750 people to assess how narcissism changed between ages...

Only a few people seem able to decipher what most people consider unreadable expressions on cats' faces, researchers find.

These "cat whisperers" can discern subtle differences on feline faces that reveal their mood. Women and people in the veterinary field, but not necessarily cat lovers, are most likely to have this ability.

"The ability to read animals' facial expressions...

Skyrocketing prices and insurance limits are driving many people with diabetes to seek medications and supplies from an underground supply chain, a new study found.

"The cost of insulin, which is required in type 1 diabetes and a subset of type 2 diabetes, has increased substantially over the last decade. As the price of insulin rises and insurance premiums and deductibles go up, too...

Fifteen million kids attend high school in the United States, and around 1 in 18 goes armed with a gun, a new study finds.

That's nearly 1 million teens taking a potentially deadly weapon to school. But researchers say universal background checks can put a dent in those numbers.

While gun-toting teens were found in every state, 83% were in states that did not have unive...

"Sexting" may sound salacious, but it isn't always about sex, a new study shows.

In fact, two-thirds of adults who send these sexually oriented text messages don't have sex in mind at all, the Texas Tech University researchers report.

Some sexting is about foreplay for sex later on. Sexting is also used for reassurance about the relationship. And sometimes it's done to scor...

Even years after a gunshot wound heals, shooting survivors may be at greater risk of alcohol abuse, drug abuse and unemployment, new research finds.

The study of more than 180 gunshot victims also found that nearly half appeared to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) years after the incident.

"The effects of gunshot injuries go beyond mortality statistics and function...

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and low blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids might benefit from supplements, new research suggests.

Fish oil supplements appeared to boost attention in these kids, British researchers report.

The effect seemed limited to youngsters who weren't already getting enough omega-3 in their diets, however.

Prior ...

Even though older adults may have smaller social networks than younger adults, they have similar numbers of close friends and levels of well-being, a new study finds.

"Stereotypes of aging tend to paint older adults in many cultures as sad and lonely," said study lead author Wandi Bruine de Bruin, of the University of Leeds in England.

"But the research shows that older adul...

More Americans are having trouble falling and staying asleep, and smartphones and technology are probably to blame, researchers report.

Their analysis of data from nearly 165,000 adults nationwide showed that the number who reported difficulty falling asleep at least once a week was up 1.4% between 2013 and 2017, and those who had trouble staying asleep rose 2.7%.

Th...

Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for people who were more active at the study's ...

Making the decision to live healthier often involves important steps such as losing weight and exercising more. These are significant goals and everyday lifestyle habits that you should commit to. But there's another type of "makeover" that can benefit you in equally important ways.

That's changing your general outlook on life by boosting positivity. This mental tweak will put you in ...

"I'd love to exercise more, but I just can't find the time."

It's a common refrain from many Americans but, for most, it might also be untrue, a new survey finds.

Researchers at the nonprofit RAND Corporation polled more than 32,000 Americans over the age of 14.

The survey found that, generally, people have an average of more than five hours of leisure time per day...

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Children with an autism spectrum disorder may be twice as likely to experience pain as kids without autism, a new study suggests.

"Pain is a common but under-recognized experience for children with autism," said researcher Danielle Shapiro. She is an assistant professor of clinical psychology at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

Children with autism may experienc...

Research has long shown how psychological disorders lead to poor physical health. Now scientists are learning more about the flip side of emotions, how living a purposeful life may have as many physical benefits as inspirational ones.

Having purpose in life is simply believing that your life has meaning and that you live according to goals you set for yourself.

One study fo...

Dealing with the agitation, anxiety and aggression that often come with dementia is one of the most challenging aspects of caring for someone with this brain disorder. But new research suggests that massage and other non-drug treatments may be more effective than medications.

Even just taking people with dementia outdoors can help, said study author Dr. Jennifer Watt, a geriatrician ...

Historically, black teenagers in the United States have had lower suicide rates than whites. But a new study finds that more black teens have been attempting suicide in recent years -- and experts are not sure why.

Researchers at New York University found that between 1991 and 2017, there was an increase in the number of black teenagers who said they'd att...

How do you make healthy food more popular? Start by giving it a yummy-sounding name, researchers say.

People are much more likely to choose good-for-you foods like broccoli or carrots if labeled with names that emphasize taste over nutritional value, according to Alia Crum, an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University, and her colleagues.

In previous research...

Parents want the best for their children. Eat well. Get enough sleep. Exercise. But sometimes pressuring your teen to diet or lose weight may end up harming them, a new study suggests.

It found that parents who urge their kids to diet might actually be boosting their odds for obesity later in life. It's also tied to an increased risk for eating disorders.

The phenomenon can ...

College kids who get good shuteye may stand a better chance of making the Dean's list, a new study finds.

"The fact that there was a correlation between sleep and performance wasn't surprising, but the extent of it was," said researcher Jeffrey Grossman. He's a professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

It...

If your teenager won't cooperate, Mom, it might just be your tone of voice.

Speaking in a controlling tone unleashes a range of negative emotions in your son or daughter and pushes him or her away, researchers warn.

For the study of more than 1,000 14- and 15-year-olds, British researchers asked mothers to give their teens instructions using the same words, but different to...

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is in the news a lot, and now newer research has prompted a leading pediatricians' group to update its guidelines for diagnosing and treating the disorder for the first time since 2011.

Dr. Mark Wolraich, lead author of the guidelines, noted that there weren't any dramatic differences between these and previous guidelines. But, he said,...

Your cat may often act indifferent, but deep down, Fluffy is as attached to you as your child or your dog, new research shows.

The finding suggests bonding goes beyond species, the researchers said.

"In both dogs and cats, attachment to humans may represent an adaptation of the offspring-caretaker bond," said Kristyn Vitale. She's a researcher in the Human-Animal Interaction...

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