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Results for search "Genetics".

Health News Results - 169

People who vape have potentially cancer-causing changes in their DNA similar to those found in cigarette smokers, according to a new study.

These chemical alterations -- called epigenetic changes -- can cause genes to malfunction. They are found in nearly all types of cancer, as well as other serious diseases, the researchers noted.

"That doesn't mean that these people are g...

A genetic variant associated with Alzheimer's disease increases the risk of dementia in people with Parkinson's disease, researchers say.

The finding could lead to new treatments for dementia in Parkinson's patients, according to the team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder that causes tremors, ...

In a first, scientists have used gene-editing technology to create "designer" immune system cells that can fight tumors and survive for months in cancer patients' bodies.

It's a proof of principle, the researchers say -- and an early step toward bringing the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR into cancer treatment.

CRISPR allows researchers to precisely "snip" bits of DNA wit...

A rare, inherited muscle disorder that occurs in about 1 in 8,000 people, myotonic dystrophy also can affect the heart and other organs. A new set of expert recommendations offers guidance for managing the progressive condition.

"Your average cardiologist doesn't see this all the time, so it can often get overlooked," said lead author, Dr. Elizabeth McNally. "We want to make sure peo...

A breakthrough study has identified a class of natural gene variants that may protect against Alzheimer's disease.

For the study, researchers at University College London analyzed DNA from more than 10,000 people -- half with Alzheimer's and half without. The investigators found that these gene variants reduce the functioning of proteins called tyrosine phosphatases.

These p...

Cancer is a genetically driven disease, and a mother lode of new genetic data on dozens of different cancers is promising to break open fresh avenues of prevention and treatment.

Nineteen out of 20 cancers now can be tracked back to one or more specific genetic mutations, based on data gathered from in-depth sequencing of thousands of whole-cancer genomes, researchers say.

"...

As China races to stem the spread of a new coronavirus that has now infected nearly 10,000 people and killed more than 200, researchers report that a novel approach to gene sequencing could help monitor coronaviruses more effectively.

Coronaviruses in bats have been linked to the outbreak from the virus labeled 2019-nCoV, as well as outbreaks of diseases like SARS and MERS.

...

A gene mutation implicated in the risk for Alzheimer's disease might also impair memory in soccer players who head the ball a lot, a new study suggests.

The finding could have implications for young athletes in contact sports where the head can take hits during play.

Among soccer players who headed the ball the most, those with the gene mutation called the apolipoprotein E ...

More than 100 genes appear to be involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), according to the largest genetic study of the condition to date.

The study, involving over 50 centers around the globe, identified 102 genes associated with ASD -- including a few dozen that had not been recognized before.

Some of the genes are also associated with intellectual disabilities and dev...

A new study suggests that genetics is not destiny when it comes to your odds of becoming obese.

For years, research into "obesity genes" has led many Americans to believe that their DNA makes becoming overweight and obese inevitable.

But the new study shows that daily lifestyle -- not genes -- probably plays the much bigger role.

The study tracked data on more tha...

It may be possible to predict a child's chances of academic success at birth, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that kids' genes and their parents' education and wealth were big predictors of school success.

They analyzed data from 5,000 children born in the U.K. between 1994 and 1996, including test results at key stages of their education and their parents' wealth and ...

Nikki Moreno had spent nearly a year struggling for breath, and nothing seemed to help.

Not the inhalers, not the antibiotics and other drugs. Nothing seemed to help her breathe, and nothing got rid of her constant cough.

It finally got so bad that she landed in the emergency room at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica.

Moreno was not prepared for the series of sho...

"Designer babies" aren't going to be a reality anytime soon, researchers say.

Concerns about genetically altering embryos to have desired traits have been around nearly as long as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and the technology to screen embryos have existed.

But while recent live births resulting from embryonic CRISPR gene editing have re-focused attention on the issue, the...

Parents usually know their child better than anyone, and if a parent suspects something is wrong, it probably is.

That was the case for Dan and Laura Wallenberg from Columbus, Ohio. EV Wallenberg was just 5 months old when they noticed that their daughter wasn't eating normally. They scheduled a visit with her pediatrician.

"I knew something wasn't right. But the doctor ju...

Sudden cardiac death is terrifying because it's exactly that -- one minute you're fine and the next you're facing death, with no warning and no prior symptoms.

Now, new research shows the secret to who's at risk for cardiac arrest and who isn't could lie in people's genes. And a gene test might someday help predict who's most endangered, according to a study presented this weekend at ...

Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

But that was less likely for people who were more active at the study's ...

Could one woman's rare genetic mutation one day have a global impact on dementia risk?

It's possible, say investigators who report on a potentially groundbreaking case of a woman whose genetic mutation staved off dementia for decades, even though her brain had already been damaged by Alzheimer's disease.

While most Alzheimer's cases are not driven by genetic predispo...

Fighting cancer can be a long, hard battle, not to mention expensive. Now, new research shows that a quarter of oncologists don't discuss the cost of expensive tests with their patients.

Genomic tests on cancer cells can help determine which types of treatment might work, and which ones might not. However, such testing can be expensive, and not all tests and related treatments are cov...

A three-drug combo that significantly improves lung function in cystic fibrosis patients could benefit 90% of people with the life-threatening disease, a new study suggests.

It included patients with a single copy of the most common genetic mutation for the disease.

Results of the international phase 3 clinical trial led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve ...

A new drug to treat most cystic fibrosis patients has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Trikafta (elexacaftor/ivacaftor/tezacaftor) is the first triple combination therapy available to treat patients with the most common cystic fibrosis mutation. Its list price is $311,000 a year, same as one of the maker's earlier treatments for the genetic disease.

Tr...

A drug that targets faulty gene repair may buy more time for some men with advanced prostate cancer, a new clinical trial finds.

Experts called the study "landmark," because it zeroed in on men with particular gene mutations that can be targeted with newer drug therapies. It's an approach that is already used in treating breast, ovarian and lung cancers.

Specifically, the tr...

You may have the extinct humans called Denisovans to thank for your adaptable immune system, Australian researchers suggest.

Denisovans were related to Neanderthals and interbred with modern humans about 50,000 years ago as modern humans left Africa for Papua New Guinea and Australia.

Modern humans got a gene variant from Denisovans that boosted immune reactions and inflamm...

New experiments in monkeys suggest that one slight alteration to the DNA of the Ebola virus might render it harmless to humans.

Changing just a single protein appears to activate the body's immune system to fight off the deadly infection, researchers report.

The mutated virus also acts like a vaccine that protects the animals from becoming infected, they added.

For...

Could your genes be keeping you from losing weight?

While you shouldn't use a family tendency toward wide hips or an apple shape as an excuse to stray from a healthy diet, acceptance can help you reassess your personal ideal and make you happier with your body.

Hundreds of genes have been linked to weight. Some affect where fat is distributed on your body while others impac...

Growing up in a poor neighborhood significantly increases kids' odds of becoming obese adults, and the risk is highest among teens, a new study says.

It found that children from poor neighborhoods had 31% higher odds for adult obesity, and the risk was much higher (29%) among 11- to 18-year-olds than for younger children (13%).

"Growing up in a disadvantaged neig...

For the first time, scientists have found four spots on your DNA that might determine whether you wield your pen with your left hand.

Of the four gene regions, three are associated with proteins involved in brain development and structure, according to a genetic analysis of about 400,000 people in the United Kingdom, including more than 38,000 left-handers.

The study also fo...

Small, lasting changes in cholesterol and blood pressure levels can dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes over a lifetime, new research suggests.

The large study found that a combination of a drop in LDL cholesterol (the bad type) of 14 mg/dL and a 5 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) cut the lifetime risk of heart di...

An unhealthy lifestyle is a bigger contributor to heart disease than genetics for many younger adults, according to a new study.

The findings show that good health habits should be a key part of prevention efforts, even in people with a family history of early heart disease, researchers said.

The study included 1,075 people under age 50. Of those,...

There's no such thing as a single "gay gene" that drives a person's sexual behavior, concludes the largest genetic study ever conducted on the issue.

Instead, a person's attraction to those of the same sex is shaped by a complex mix of genetic and environmental influences, similar to what's seen in most other human traits, researchers report.

"This is a natural and normal pa...

An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us further by suggesting that optimistic peo...

Seniors, here's a recipe for preventing dementia: eat well, exercise and don't smoke.

The only catch, according to a new study? If you carry genes that leave you vulnerable to the memory-robbing disease, lifestyle might not be enough.

In the study, researchers found that of over 6,300 adults aged 55 and older, those with healthy habits had a lower risk of being diagnosed wit...

Mutations in two genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- are known to significantly increase the risk of breast cancer, but experts have long debated which women should be tested for them.

New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) may help clarify who can benefit most from a risk assessment test. Now, if a woman has a high risk, the task force is recommending that...

A middle-aged woman had persistent symptoms that doctors couldn't explain. Frustrated, she took an increasingly common route: a search through the internet.

"Dr. Google" led the woman to specialists at Wake Forest University Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. There, she was diagnosed with a rare genetic condition called autosomal dominant tubulointerstit...

The number of genes in bacteria that live in and on people could top 1 billion trillion -- and at least half appear to be unique to their host.

That mindboggling math comes from scientists at Harvard Medical School and Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston who have set out to map all genes of the human microbiome.

The research could reveal links between microbiome genes and human...

In a finding that underscores the major role genetics plays in autism risk, researchers report they have identified 16 new genes linked to the developmental disorder.

The investigators conducted genetic analyses of 2,300 people from nearly 500 families with at least two children with autism. Of the children in the study, 960 had autism and 217 did not.

The researchers pinpoi...

If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link accounted for 4.1% of all blood cancer ...

The sad sight of a receding hairline is not limited to men, a dermatologist says.

Hair loss is just as common in women, and it can occur due to factors such as genetics, and the hairstyles and hair products used by women.

It's important to identify the cause of hair loss in women to treat it, said dermatologist Dr. Paradi Mirmirani.

"Making sure you have the right...

As far as scientists know, humans are the only species that get heart attacks linked to clogged arteries.

Now, new research suggests that just one DNA change occurring 2 to 3 million years ago may be to blame.

The finding might give insight into how to prevent and treat the attacks, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Already, they say...

The largest study of its kind, involving more than 2 million people across five countries, finds that autism spectrum disorders are 80% reliant on inherited genes.

That means that environmental causes are responsible for just 20% of the risk.

The findings could open new doors to research into the genetic causes of autism, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control an...

It's not easy maintaining a healthy weight. Even when you manage to drop a few pounds, they often return.

Why would the body seem to encourage obesity?

New research suggests the answer lies far back in human evolution, with an anti-starvation mechanism that primes the body to store fat.

The key to this mechanism is a protein dubbed "RAGE," according to New York Un...

You might think that stress affects you only emotionally or that a lack of sleep simply leaves you feeling cranky. But these are among the many lifestyle factors that can lead to health problems because of changes that they cause within your body's cells.

Packed inside every cell is your DNA and its strands of chromosomes. Chromosomes are protected, top and bottom, by sections called ...

Every college student misplaces keys or forgets an appointment from time to time. Usually it's no big deal. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer's disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious.

That's the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85.

...

Medication can play a huge role in reducing high blood pressure, a leading cause of stroke, heart attack and other serious health problems. Yet given the wide selection of drugs for doctors to choose from, figuring out which drug works best for someone is difficult.

But researchers may have found a better way to predict the effectiveness and side effects of blood pressure drugs, and ...

Children with birth defects may be at increased risk for childhood cancer, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 10 million children born in Texas, Arkansas, Michigan and North Carolina between 1992 and 2013.

Compared to children without a birth defect, those with genetic defects were almost 12 times more likely to develop cancer by age 18. Those whose ...

In most patients with metastatic colon cancer, the disease may have begun spreading throughout the body very early on -- when the original tumor was no bigger than a poppy seed, a new study suggests.

Metastatic refers to the most advanced stage of cancer, when the original tumor has spread to distant sites in the body.

Traditionally, that's been seen as a "late" event -- the...

For women, predicting when they'll reach menopause is anyone's guess. But if you want to get some foresight, you should ask your mother.

For most women, menopause begins at around 52. But for thousands of women it starts much later, and for some, a lot earlier. Those whose menopause starts later may also be looking at a longer life expectancy, researchers have found.

Smoking...

Can a DNA test predict a person's future heart health? Perhaps, researchers say.

A team of Canadian researchers found that by analyzing a person's entire genome, it might be possible to predict their future heart disease risk.

The so-called "polygenic risk score" analysis looks for key heart disease indicators -- genetic "biomarkers" -- along with an individual's entire g...

Last year, a scientist from China created a storm of controversy when he claimed he'd used gene-editing technology to create "designer" twin babies. Now, a new study is highlighting one of the dangers of that endeavor.

Researchers have found that the gene mutation the scientist used -- affecting a gene called CCR5 -- is associated with a shorter life span: People who carry two copies ...

Ever wonder why a drug that works for someone else doesn't seem to work for you? You might want to check your gut for the answer.

Gut bacteria that process more than 150 medicines have been pinpointed by researchers, who also identified genes that give the bacteria this ability.

The findings underline the role gut bacteria play in how well people respond to medications, acco...

A gene-based blood test can accurately detect breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, gastric or bile duct cancers in patients, researchers report.

The test uses artificial intelligence to identify and interpret "fragments" of DNA in the blood that indicate the presence of cancer, explained researchers led by Dr. Victor Velculescu. He helps direct the Cancer Biology Program at ...