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Results for search "Birth Control".

06 Dec

Once-A-Month Birth Control Pill Now Being Developed

Researchers in Boston are working on an ingestible alternative to daily oral contraceptive pills.

04 Dec

Birth Control Pills And Brain Health

Women taking birth control pills may experience changes in a key region of the brain.

Health News Results - 31

Genetics may explain why some women gain weight when using a popular method of birth control, researchers say.

"For years, women have said that birth control causes them to gain weight but many doctors failed to take them seriously," said lead study author Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz. He's assistant professor of obstetrics/gynecology and family planning at the University of Colorado School of...

Sexual health programs appear to help increase condom use and abstinence among black American teens, researchers say.

They analyzed data from 29 studies that examined the effect of school- and community-based programs on nearly 12,000 teens.

"We focused on black adolescents because they face greater health disparities when it comes to the risk of unplanned pregnancy and cont...

Many women use birth control pills or other hormone-based contraceptives to enjoy sex without fear of an unplanned pregnancy. But could they kill your mojo?

There has been some concern that a woman's sex drive can drop after starting a new form of hormone-based birth control. Sex drive studies involving the pill, the patch and hormone-releasing intrauterine devices (IUDs) have been m...

Scientists have developed a method that might eventually allow women to take birth control pills just once a month.

In lab experiments, the researchers found that their tiny drug-delivery device -- contained within a gelatin-coated capsule -- worked as hoped: In pigs, it remained in the stomach, slowly releasing the birth control hormone levonorgestrel for up to one month.

M...

A small, preliminary study suggests that a brain area called the hypothalamus appears to be about 6% smaller in women who use birth control pills.

But exactly what that means isn't yet clear. In this study, women on the pill had statistically significant increases in anger. Researchers also found a possible link with depression symptoms.

The good news: They didn't see ...

Babies born with serious heart defects are surviving to adulthood in greater numbers, but new research shows they face another hurdle when they get there: heart failure.

The study found children born with the most critical heart problems were 30 times more likely to develop or die from heart failure or need a transplant in young adulthood than those born with less severe heart proble...

Researchers have developed a skin patch that might one day give women the ability to self-administer long-acting birth control.

The patch, which contains "micro-needles" absorbed into the skin, is seen as a possible alternative to current long-acting contraceptives. Those methods -- intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants -- are highly effective at preventing pregnancy....

As soon as Paul Cardall was born, doctors knew something was terribly wrong. He was a blue baby. Oxygenated blood wasn't pumping properly through his body.

At only 22 hours old, Cardall underwent a difficult operation to save his life. The doctors discovered what amounted to only half a functioning heart and they warned his parents it was only a temporary fix for his complex congenit...

Despite the fact that intrauterine devices, or IUDs, are extremely effective forms of birth control, one expert thinks many women don't have all the facts when considering the option.

Ob-gyn Dr. M. Kathleen Borchardt, from Houston Methodist Health System, is hoping to set the record straight with five basic facts about IUDs.

First off, when your doctor puts an IUD in place i...

In recent years, a growing number of companies have been offering prescriptions for birth control through web-based services and smartphone apps. Now a "secret shopper" study suggests it's a safe and reliable source for women.

So-called "telecontraception" services have emerged as an alternative to trips to the doctor or local family planning clinic. They allow women to get prescripti...

A leading group of U.S. doctors has broadened its guidelines on birth control, recommending that all forms of hormonal contraceptives, including vaginal rings and contraceptive patches, be sold over the counter.

In addition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said DMPA (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) injections should also be available over the counter,...

Parents who worry about discussing sex with their kids can relax: New research shows it leads teens to adopt safer practices and doesn't make them more likely to become sexually active.

That's the upshot of an analysis of 31 studies on the effectiveness of parent-based sexual health interventions. The research included nearly 12,500 9- to 18-year-olds.

These interventions wo...

Jennifer Michele always has had a knack for sprucing up spaces. That talent prompted her to start an interior design firm in 2007. She then quickly landed the sort of high-profile design job that can make a career.

Less than a year later, at age 29, she had a stroke.

It happened on a late November morning in Vail, Colorado, where Michele lived with her then-husband Brent W...

As soon as he could walk, Easton Fryer bolted into his backyard whenever he heard an airplane flying over his home in Hamilton, Montana.

His second birthday party was held at the Ravalli County Airport. His first flight came months later. He's since flown in a two-seater and a helicopter. After his first commercial trip, the crew let him announce over the loudspeaker, "This is your c...

Giving U.S. female military veterans a year's supply of birth control pills would reduce their risk of unwanted pregnancies and lower health care costs, a new study finds.

The researchers also found that the health care cost savings would more than outweigh the expense of providing birth control pills in larger quantities.

Specifically, among the approximately 24,000 women r...

A severe and potentially disabling form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5% of women of childbearing age, an expert says.

Like PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) may cause bloating, breast tenderness, fatigue and changes in sleep and eating habits. In PMDD, at least one of these symptoms also occurs: sadness or hopelessness; anxiety or tension; extreme moodine...

A drug touted as a "female Viagra" can cause severe low blood pressure and fainting when used with alcohol, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

As a result, the agency has ordered the drug's maker Sprout Pharmaceuticals to make a safety labeling change to Addyi (flibanserin).

The boxed warning, contraindication, warnings and precautions, and adverse reactions sectio...

Talking to your children about sex can be awkward, but new research suggests that parents need to have those conversations much earlier than they do.

In two national surveys, investigators found that between 4% and 8% of boys reported having sex before they were 13. That number varied greatly depending on where the boys lived. In San Francisco, just 5% of boys said they h...

The protection that birth control pills offer against ovarian cancer is strongest with the most aggressive forms of the disease, a new study says.

For several years, researchers have noted that women who have used oral contraceptives are less likely to develop ovarian cancer. This study took a closer look at that link.

Researchers at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center ...

A male contraceptive pill, long a goal of men -- and women -- everywhere, may be one step closer to reality, U.S. researchers report.

They say their experimental pill appears to be safe while reducing levels of hormones key to sperm production.

"Our results suggest that this pill, which combines two hormonal activities in one, will decrease sperm production while preserving ...

Women who get pregnant when using certain contraceptives might have their genes to blame, a new study suggests.

A gene variant that breaks down hormones in birth control could be the culprit, researchers reported.

"When a woman says she got pregnant while on birth control, the assumption was always that it was somehow her fault," said lead study author Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz. "...

Interpret the data whatever way you will, but a new study shows a jump in women getting long-term contraception in the month following the election of President Donald Trump.

The researchers' theory?

Study author Dr. Lydia Pace acknowledged that "there is limited concrete evidence about why this may have happened," but she stressed that the findings "strongly suggest that th...

The research is in its early days, but Chinese scientists say they're using bartenders' tricks to stir up a new, reversible male contraceptive.

In experiments with rats, the method successfully kept sexually active males from impregnating females for more than two months.

"The two most widely used male contraceptives are condom and vasectomy," noted a team led by Xiaolei Wan...

Today's teens are better at using birth control when they first become sexually active, but many unexpected pregnancies still occur, new research finds.

Teens who didn't use birth control during their first month of sexual activity faced nearly a fourfold increase in the risk of an unwanted pregnancy within three months, the study found.

"Our findings suggest that early in...

An experimental vaginal ring meant to prevent pregnancy and HIV looks safe, according to an early stage study.

The dual-purpose ring releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine and the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel, said researchers led by Dr. Sharon Achilles, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

"We are very encouraged by our findings in this first-in...

American women are having fewer children, and they're having them later in life, a new government report shows.

"Overall, we saw continuing decreasing trends in total fertility," said report author Danielle Ely, a health statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which is part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Jennifer Wu, an...

During the last few months of her pregnancy, Lisa Livesay closed the door to the nursery she and her husband, Chris, had created for their third child. She couldn't bear to look inside, not knowing if the cozy space would ever be home to their baby.

The couple had anticipated their usual complications -- Lisa's first two pregnancies were rough and those children (another son and a da...

Moms who breastfeed their first child for at least five months are likely to have more kids than women who stop sooner or bottle-feed, a new study suggests.

The finding comes from an analysis of data on nearly 3,700 mothers collected between 1979 and 2012. Cornell University researchers compared how many children each woman hoped to have before getting pregnant to their actual outcome...

Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, may close a big gap in women's access to reproductive health care, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 1,200 women of childbearing age enrolled in Michigan's expansion of Medicaid for low-income adults, one in three said the expanded coverage improved her access to birth control and family planning serv...

Amid lawsuits and plummeting sales for its Essure birth control device, drug giant Bayer announced Friday that it would cease U.S. sales of the product by the end of 2018.

"This decision is based on a decline in U.S. sales of Essure in recent years and the conclusion that the Essure business is no longer sustainable," Bayer said in a statement. The United States was the last country ...

Drugs taken by more than one-third of U.S. adults have depression as a possible side effect, a new study reveals.

These medications include blood pressure drugs called beta-blockers, hormonal contraceptives and pain medications, researchers said.

And they're used by 37 percent of Americans, according to the study of 26,000 adults.

"The use of multiple medications a...

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