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Results for search "Health Care Access / Disparities".

23 Mar

Animal Study of Male Birth Control Pill Shows Promise

A new, non-hormonal male birth control pill is highly effective in mice and could begin human trials in 2022, researchers say.

03 Mar

HealthDay Now: Are Apps the Future of Chronic Condition Care?

  • HealthDay’s Mabel Jong is joined by Dr. David W. Bates, an internationally renowned expert in patient safety and health care technology, to discuss the current landscape of health apps and how these tools can be used to improve the management and treatment of chronic conditions.

23 Feb

Exercising After COVID or Flu Shot May Boost Immune Response

90 minutes of light-to-moderate exercise after COVID or flu vaccination may help you produce more antibodies, researchers say.

Health News Results - 291

Even though Black people may be more likely to live near a hospital with a certified stroke center, those who need the specialty care are still more likely to receive it at a hospital with fewer resources.

And this can hurt the...

TUESDAY, June 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black...

MONDAY, June 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Medically supervised exercise programs can do heart patients a lot of good, but few people of color take part in them -- regardless of income, new research finds.

The study, of more than 100,000 U.S. patients, found that while all were eligible for

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 27, 2022
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  • The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn a woman's right to have an abortion marks a "very dark day in health care" that will leave patients at risk and doctors afraid to act, leaders of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said Friday.

    "It is a dark day indeed for t...

    Despite improvements in treatment for heart attacks, care lags behind for women.

    Women are still less likely to receive timely care, according to a new study that reviewed 450,000 patient records for two types of heart attacks.

    "Heart attack treatments have come a long way but timely acc...

    Suicide rates are rising more slowly in states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

    “Suicide is a public health problem, and our findings indicate that increasing access to health care -- including mental health care -- by expanding Medicaid eligibility can play an i...

    In yet another sign that the pandemic has exacerbated disparities in health care, researchers report that the life expectancy of Native Americans plummeted by nearly five years as the new coronavirus raged across the country.

    The loss in longevity was far greater than any other ethnic group and about three times h...

    WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- There is a "staggering" gap between the number of Americans who need care for anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions and those who can actually get it, a new survey shows.

    In all, 42% of U.S. adults who needed care in the previous 12 months did not get it because of costs and other barriers, according to the on...

    High-tech devices and communication helped ease the impact of COVID-19 lockdowns on children with type 1 diabetes, researchers said in a new study.

    Pandemic shutdowns caused significant disruptions in health care, and previous studies have shown that diabetes patients had worse blood sugar (glucose) control and more difficulty accessing care during the early days of the pandemic.

    Bu...

    Even with Roe v. Wade still the law of the land, primary care doctors in the United States have difficulty prescribing U.S. federally approved abortion pills, a new study finds.

    Getting in the way is a complex combination of state and federal regulations, insufficient training and institutional hurdles, researchers found when they surveyed dozens of doctors.

    "As family physicians pr...

    Race and ethnicity matter when battling colon cancer, with young white patients facing notably better odds than Black, Hispanic or Asian patients, new research warns.

    A look at colon cancer survival among Americans younger than 50 turned up a glaring discrepancy: Survival five years after diagnosis improved to nearly 70% among white patients over two decades, but was less than 58% among ...

    With Roe v. Wade hanging in the balance and nearly half of all American states ready to practically ban abortion if the leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court stands, the realities of giving birth in this country are being put under a microscope, and for good reason.

    "Today, [America] is considered the most dangerous developed nation in the world in which to give birth," said St...

    Americans with sickle cell disease who have private insurance face average out-of-pocket costs of $1,300 a year and a lifetime total of $44,000, new research reveals.

    That means that their out-of-pocket expenses are nearly four times higher compared to people without the inherited blood disorder, the

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 23, 2022
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  • A new report on how Black Americans are faring against cancer offers up a decidedly mixed picture.

    The risk that a Black man or woman in America will die from cancer has steadily declined over the last two decades, the newly published research found.

    Unfortunately, that risk...

    Tens of millions of American women will have to journey much farther for abortion care if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade as expected, researchers say.

    Dozens of states would make abortion illegal in the wake of such a ruling, which would force about 24 million women to travel at least 150 miles more than they do now to obtain abortion care.

    "There are already huge disp...

    When Hispanic Americans arrive in the emergency room with chest pain, they have to wait longer for care than other people with the same symptoms, a preliminary study finds.

    Chest pain, a potential sign of heart attack, is one of the leading reasons people end up in an ER. But the new findings suggest that Hispanic patients may face unnecessary delays in either receiving care, being admitt...

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

    "

    Uterine cancer deaths have been increasing in the United States, particularly among Black women. Now, research appears to pinpoint a cause.

    A rare but aggressive type of cancer known as Type 2 endometrial cancer is more difficult to treat and was responsible for 20% of cases and 45% of deaths identified in the study.

    Deaths from this type of cancer increased by 2.7% per year during...

    Women and people of color with chest pain — the most common symptom signaling a heart attack — face longer waits in U.S. emergency departments than men and white people do, new research reveals.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 4,000 patients, aged 18 to 55, seen for chest pain at emer...

    Patients with atrial fibrillation usually receive blood thinners to reduce their stroke risk, but these drugs are under-prescribed to Black Americans, a new study reveals.

    When they leave the hospital, Black patients are 25% less likely than whites to be prescribed

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 3, 2022
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  • Use of a high-tech radiation cancer treatment called proton beam therapy (PBT) has increased overall in the United States, but Black patients are getting it less often than white patients, two ne...

    After childbirth, some women who received an epidural for pain will develop a debilitating headache. But minority women are less likely than white moms to receive the treatment that can provide relief, according to a new study.

    Researchers also found that even when women from minority groups received this care, it was more likely to be delayed.

    "There's a gap in the quality of care ...

    Insufficient vitamin D may play a role in breast cancer, especially among minority women, new research indicates.

    Black and Hispanic American women with low vitamin D levels have a higher risk of breast cancer than those with sufficient vitamin D levels, researchers found.

    The findings sugge...

    Black, Hispanic and Asian Americans have an increased risk of being diagnosed with dementia as they age -- for reasons that are not entirely understood, a large new study finds.

    The study, of nearly 1.9 million older U.S. veterans, found that compared with their white counterparts, Black vets were 54% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over a decade. That risk was nearly doubled am...

    Black Americans are far less likely to be included in clinical trials of pancreatic cancer drugs than white Americans, and eligibility criteria are a significant factor in that gap, according to a new study.

    "The standard of care in cancer treatment is informed by studies conducted with predominantly non-Hispanic white patients," said study author Dr. Jose Trevino, chairman of surgical on...

    THURSDAY, April 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) --The nursing home industry is awash in ineffective care and staffing shortages, claims a new report that calls for sweeping changes in an industry whose failures have only been exacerbated by the pandemic.

    Experts from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine minced no words in in their 605-page

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 7, 2022
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  • More than 10,000 American lives have been saved since lung cancer screening was introduced for high-risk people who are over 55 and have a history of smoking, a new study shows.

    But many poor people and those in ethnic/racial minority groups are still missing out on the benefits of screening for the world's leading cause of cancer death, researchers noted.

    To assess the impacts of t...

    Special needs children often require out-of-network care from specialists, which means more out-of-pocket costs and extra stress for families, a new study finds.

    "In the U.S., the reality is that the more health care needs you have, especially from specialists, the greater chance you will find your needs won't be met, even if you have private insurance coverage," said lead author Wendy Xu...

    Nearly 60 million Americans live in "dental deserts," while many more can't afford basic dental care even if it is available.

    Enter dental therapists.

    New research suggests these newly minted health care professionals could help more people get the oral hea...

    Severe COVID can inflict heavy physical damage on patients, but many recovering from their infection also take a financial hit, a new study finds.

    Up to 10% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 are billed $2,000 or more six months after leaving the hospital, even when insurance providers waive their charges, researchers report.

    "Bills for post-discharge care can be large for some...

    Here's a compelling reason to shed those extra pounds: A new study finds that middle-aged people who are obese, or even simply overweight, may face more health problems down the road.

    The study, of nearly 30,000 men and women, found that the more people weighed around age 40, the greater their odds of chronic health conditions after age 65. And

  • Amy Norton
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  • March 21, 2022
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  • Most medical debt will be dropped from Americans' credit reports as of this summer, the top three credit reporting agencies said Friday.

    The announcement by Equifax, Experian and TransUnion comes as medical bills have become the largest source of personal debt in the United States, ...

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine has become a humanitarian crisis.

    More than 3 million people have fled as refugees into neighboring countries, while thousands of civilians who remain in Ukraine have been injured by Russian shelling and missile attacks.

    In response, relief organizations have flooded the area to provide health care and aid to the suffering.

    Want to contribute?

    Bringing home a baby should be an exciting and blissful time, but for many new parents, colossal out-of-pocket costs for pregnancy and delivery take the joy out of this milestone.

    Some low-income families spend close to 20% of their annual income on medical costs during the year of pregnancy and birth, a new study found.

    "Being pregnant and delivering a baby puts many families at fi...

    Katherine Stewart, 16, must take six to 10 insulin shots a day to properly manage her type 1 diabetes.

    Her Highland, Utah, family pays $500 a month out of pocket for her insulin. Before they meet their insurance's deductible, they shell out the cash price of nearly $2,000 a month.

    Now Stewart is preparing to leave the nest, and she doesn't know how she'll be able to afford it.

    A healthy bank account pays dividends after a heart attack, with new research indicating severe financial strain increases survivors' risk of death.

    Researchers analyzed data from nearly 3,000 people, 75 and older, whose health was tracked after they suffered a heart attack.

    "Our research indicates the i...

    Palliative care can be a godsend in the final days of one's life, but new research shows that Black and Hispanic nursing home residents are far less likely to receive it than their white peers are.

    Overall, nursing homes in the Northeast provided the most palliative care, while those in ...

    Health and fitness apps are growing in popularity, but not among the people who might benefit most from them seniors and people with chronic health conditions.

    Nearly two out of three American adults are living with a chronic health problem like heart disease, diabetes or asthma, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll survey found.

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  • March 7, 2022
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  • Are you managing a chronic health problem, be it obesity or diabetes or heart disease or asthma?

    There's likely an app for that.

    Health apps are becoming more and more sophisticated, offering smartphone users help in dealing with chronic ailments, said Dr. David Bates, chief of internal med...

    Navigating the health care system can be challenging, but an expert urges older people not to try to go it alone.

    "It's common for someone who hasn't had any health problems suddenly to be faced with their own issues and the need to navigate the health care system," said Maria Radwanski, manager of care transitions and outpatient adult care management at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershe...

    In a sign that the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on routine health care, many of the nearly one-third of older Americans who had a medical procedure, primary care visit or dental appointment canceled or postponed due to COVID still haven't received that care, a new poll finds.

    "Whether they chose to postpone or their provider did, these patients missed opportunities for preventive car...

    Proposed changes to voluntary federal guidelines for prescribing opioid painkillers emphasize that doctors should first try other treatments for acute and chronic pain.

    The non-opioid treatment options suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention include prescription medications like gabapenti...

    To live healthier and longer in the United States, it helps to have money and education -- and if you live in Hawaii or California, your odds are even better, according to a new government report.

    Life expectancy varies dramatically from state to state, health officials say, because of factors like chronic disease and drug overdoses; rates of obesity, smoking and health insurance, an...

    You have almost certainly seen the pleas while scrolling through social media: Called crowdfunding, folks try to raise money to pay for their sick loved one's mounting medical bills.

    But new research shows these grassroots campaigns rarely raise enough money to make a difference.

    According to GoFundMe, which corner...

    Hospitalizations for dangerously high blood pressure more than doubled in the United States from 2002 to 2014, new research shows.

    This jump in hospitalizations for what's called a "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 1, 2022
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  • While it appears that Black Americans were more hesitant than white Americans to roll up their sleeves when the COVID-19 vaccines launched last year, that unwillingness has lessened.

    Following 1,200 U.S. adults through much of the pandemic, researchers found Black people were more likely to change their negative thinking about COVID-19 vaccination compared to white people.

    Yet, aft...

    Even in a setting where white and Black people have equal access to medical care, Black Americans fare worse than whites in terms of prostate cancer, new research shows.

    A review of nearly 8 million men seen at America's Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals found that Black veterans had nearly twice the incidence of localized and advanced

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 19, 2022
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  • Homelessness is difficult enough, but when it's compounded by serious mental health issues the result can be an inability to function at even the most basic level.

    Sometimes that leads to round-the-clock involuntary hospitalization, and when that happens a state-appointed psychiatric conservator can take over, making critical health care decisions for a person deemed mentally unstable.

    If COVID-19 vaccines and medicines are shared equally worldwide, the pandemic could ease this year, a top World Health Organization official said Tuesday.

    However, if wealthier countries don't share their resources with poorer countries, there will continue to be high rates of deaths and hospitalizations, warned Dr. Michael Ryan, head of emergencies at WHO.

    “What we need to do is ...

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