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Results for search "Environment".

16 May

Long-term Exposure to Wildfires Increases Cancer Risk, Study Finds

People who live near wildfires face higher risk for lung cancer and brain tumors, researchers say.

14 Apr

Are People Making Red Tide Worse on the US Coastline?

Researchers say human activity close to our waterways is intensifying algae blooms that pose health and environmental risks.

30 Dec

Climate Anxiety Is Affecting Young People Worldwide, New Study Finds

Teens and young adults say government inaction on climate change is leaving them anxious, sad and angry, researchers say.

Health News Results - 468

If you need a body image boost, go outdoors.

Whether you’re in green space, a blue space near a river or the ocean or even a snowy environment, it can make a difference.

“A body of evidence now exists showing that nature exposure — living close to, frequenting or engaging with environments such as forests and parks — is associated with a range of physical and psychological...

Fungal lung infections are spreading to parts of the United States where they were once never seen — likely a result of climate change, experts say.

To the average person, the term fungal infection may conjure up thoughts of athlete's foot or toenail problems. But some fungus species cause potentially severe respiratory infections, when a person inhales microscopic spores from fung...

Research in wild bats is reinforcing a notion crucial to stopping future pandemics: When wildlife populations stay healthy, the odds of "crossover" viruses infecting humans subsides.

In Australia, deforestation has caused a deadly respiratory virus to pass from fruit bats to humans, by forcing the two species into closer contact, a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 22, 2022
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  • Fungi found in the soil are causing lung infections nationwide, even in places that doctors aren't aware are at risk.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not revised maps for environmental fungi since 1969, according to a

    It’s sort of like the Goldilocks principle — a room that’s either too dry or too humid can influence transmission of COVID-19 and cause more illness or death, Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers say.

    Maintaining an indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% is associated with lower rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths, they reported Nov. 16 in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 18, 2022
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  • Plant-based diets can be better for the environment, but they’re not all created equally, new research shows.

    The best type of plant-based diet for health and environmental benefits are those higher in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, vegetable oils and tea/coffee.

    Meanwhile plant-based diets high in fruit juices, sugar-sweetened beverages, refined grains...

    A good workout can boost mood, making it an ideal routine as the days get shorter and darker.

    If you're one of the millions affected by seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and you feel tired, unmotivated, down on life and crave carbs and sweets, staying active can help. An expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston offers some tips for maintaining an exercise routine.

    “With ...

    The state of California is suing several companies for their role in manufacturing "forever chemicals."

    The lawsuit filed Thursday also claims that the companies, including 3M and DuPont, covered up the harm their products, commonly known as PFAS, were causing to the...

    THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to pollen allergies, there are not only bad days and bad seasons, experts with the right technology can now break down pollen counts by the hour.

    Specifically, pollen counts are lower between 4 a.m. and noon, a new study

    Equipping offices with "healthier" furnishings could reduce human exposure to risky PFAS chemicals, new research suggests.

    To look at indoor PFAS levels, a team led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston, analyzed building dust in classrooms and common campus spaces.

    “Our findings provide desperately needed scientific evidence for the success of healthier material...

    As the daylight hours shrink, people's moods can wind up in the tank.

    Rest assured, you're not alone. It’s the SAD season for those affected by seasonal affective disorder. That's the depression, fatigue and withdrawal that shorter days and longer nights often bring.

    “The seasonal mood change can come in different shapes and forms,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 7, 2022
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  • A tool used to restore forest ecosystems could also be key to the battle against tick-borne disease, researchers say.

    Forest managers and land owners use prescribed fire to combat invasive species, improve wildlife habitat and restore ecosystem health.

    A recent study suggests it could ...

    Despite the presence of gorilla trekkers in their habitat, endangered gorillas in the region surrounding East Africa's Virunga Volcanoes do not have human herpesvirus, researchers say.

    The Gorilla Doctors team was able to assess the region's mountain gorillas in a noninvasive way, simply watching the animals as they walked through the forest.

    As the gorillas chomped on vegetation s...

    The key to narrowing the gap in how long a person lives if they're poor vs. if they're wealthy could be as simple as adding green space to certain neighborhoods.

    Every 10% increase in natural space and private gardens was linked to a 7% drop in early deaths in people younger than 65, according to a new study published Oct. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. <...

    The Atlantic seaboard could be in for faster-forming and wetter hurricanes, new research warns.

    Climate change is the overarching cause, experts say.

    As parts of the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico recover from powerful hurricanes

  • Cara Murez
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  • October 18, 2022
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  • Aggressive measures are needed in the world's tropical regions to prevent the inevitable next global pandemic, an international coalition of researchers has concluded.

    Epidemics around the world have largely been driven by viruses that spill over from wild animals into humans, mainly in tropical hot ...

    School-age children are increasingly dying after being injured with guns, with firearms now the United States' second-leading cause of death in 5- to 18-year-olds.

    After 19 children and two teachers were killed and 17 others were wounded in May at a school in Uvalde, Texas, researchers set out to investigate ...

    Do the majority of Americans want government to make sure the products they buy are free of harmful chemicals?

    Yes, a new survey shows, and they are even willing to pay more to get that assurance of safety.

    “At a time when most issues are politically polarized, the issue of keeping people ...

    While the United States has recently ordered a $290 million supply of a drug meant to treat radiation sickness, federal health officials say that's not cause for alarm.

    It's coincidental that the order of

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • October 10, 2022
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  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken a major step to curb the largest remaining source of airborne lead pollution.

    The agency has proposed a so-called endangerment finding that aircraft that use leaded fuel cause or contribute to

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 7, 2022
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  • As Florida and nearby states brace for the potential impact of Hurricane Ian, residents in the storm's path should also think about the hazards they may face in its aftermath.

    If high winds take out your electricity, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) offers tips for staying safe.

    First, be cautious about using a generator. The carbon monoxide (CO) from a porta...

    Climate change could spell trouble for those with heart failure, a new study suggests.

    When the temperatures soared in France during the summer of 2019, the heat wave appears to have worsened the conditions of heart failure patients, researchers report.

    "The finding is timely, given the heat waves again this year," said study a...

    Your children's school clothes may look neat, but are they safe to wear?

    Maybe not.

    Researchers found high levels of dangerous chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in school uniforms sold across North America. These chemicals — which can build up in people and the envir...

    Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

    Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

    The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

    A new report reveals a hidden secret about the nation's beautiful rural roads: They're too often fatal for motorists.

    Nearly half of all U.S. crashes happen on rural roads, despite only 19% of Americans living in those areas. The report, conducted by the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), details why and what can be done to prevent these fatal crashes.

    “Roads are the b...

    In Washington state, 22 wildlife bridges and underpasses provide animals with a safe way through to search for food or escape predators and wildfires.

    It turns out the crossings have been benefiting humans, too.

    In a 10-mile radius around wildlife crossings, there are between one and three fewer collisions a year between vehicles and animals, a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 31, 2022
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  • Life-threatening heat waves will become more common by the end of this century, according to a new study.

    A “dangerous” heat index — what the temperature feels like when humidity and air temperature are combined — is defined by the National Weather Service (NWS) as 103 degrees Fahrenheit. NWS defines “extremely dangerous” as 124 degrees F -- unsafe to humans for any amount of ...

    This year's hurricane season has been quiet so far, but if and when it cranks up many American cities won't be prepared to execute mass evacuations, a new study finds.

    After Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans in 2005, the country bore witness to the pitfalls of not having an effective evacuation plan. Since then on...

    Differences in lifestyles and other factors are linked to big gaps in life expectancy between residents of various U.S. states, 2020 data shows.

    That could mean almost a decade more or less of life, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

    “Among the 50 states a...

    PFAS compounds are known as “forever chemicals” because they degrade slowly in the environment and accumulate in the body, potentially harming human and animal health.

    Bacteria can't eat them. Fire can't incinerate them. Water can't dilute them.

    Instead, these per- and polyfluoroalkyl subs...

    Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

    The study — recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — looked at staffing before the COVID-19 pandemic. It f...

    While most people know that breathing in wildfire smoke isn't good for respiratory health, they may not know that unclean air is also problematic for the heart.

    Individuals with underlying

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 15, 2022
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  • President Biden was poised on Wednesday to sign a bill that expands health care benefits for U.S. veterans exposed to toxic burn pits.

    Known as the PACT Act, the legislation is the biggest expansion of veterans' health care and benefits in more than 30 years, the White House said in a

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 10, 2022
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  • Even a "small" nuclear war, far short of a global conflict, could kill much of the world's population due to starvation, a new study projects.

    Any nuclear war would have obviously devastating effects in the places where it was waged — obliterating cities, instantly killing huge numbers of people, and contaminating local soil and water.

    But the destruction would be expected to stre...

    Flooding, heat waves and drought have made 58% of infectious diseases worse, a new analysis claims.

    For the review of previous studies, published Aug. 8 in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers found that 218 of the known 375 infectious diseases have been made worse by climate change, including

    Children are not as physically fit as their parents were when they were kids, and this will likely harm them as the Earth warms, new research claims.

    The findings are based on a comprehensive review of more than 150 studies that looked at how children maintain physical activity, exercise and cope with heat, as well as how thi...

    They are called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the human body and can contribute to the risk of everything from cancer to childhood obesity.

    Now, new research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) finds they also exact a huge financial toll, costing the U.S. health system billions every year.

    ...

    Living in a region where tropical storms, hurricanes or other weather emergencies are likely means being ready for a quick evacuation.

    "Part of preparedness is having a plan," said Dr. James McDeavitt, executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "You don't want to make that plan as the hurricane is barreling down the coast. You need to <...

    Every town wants low crime rates. But a new finding may offer a whole new reason to advocate for the change: Falling crime rates may lower heart disease fatalities.

    An analysis of 2000-2014 data from Chicago illustrated a significant decline in violent crime. Across the city, the drop in total crime was 16%, while simultaneously there was a 13% decrease in

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2022
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  • Want to get fit and stay fit? Arlington, Va., may be the city for you: For the fifth year in a row, it has been named the fittest city in America.

    Meanwhile, the title of the least fit city goes to Oklahoma City, according to the annual fitnes...

    Heat coupled with smog can be a particularly lethal mix, especially for older adults, a new study finds.

    Unfortunately, both hot temperatures and air pollution are going to increase as the planet warms, and so will deaths, researchers report.

    "We are experiencing more and more frequent wildfires, which cause pollution, and

    The natural gas being piped into your home contains a wide array of toxic chemicals, including nearly two dozen so harmful they're classified as hazardous air pollutants, a new study says.

    Natural gas samples taken from 69 Boston-area cooking stoves were found to contain at least 21 different hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and hexane, according ...

    The sharp political divide in the United States may also be creating a widening gap in death rates between those on opposing sides, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston analyzed death rates and federal and state election data for all U.S. counties from 2001 to 2019.

    During that time, deaths rates in Democratic counties fel...

    Creating more parks and other green spaces could have prevented tens of thousands of deaths in dozens of large U.S. cities over the past two decades, a new study says.

    "We've known that living in greener areas can have a

    If you have both asthma and seasonal allergies, there are ways to reduce the impacts of that double whammy, an expert says.

    People with asthma, a chronic lung condition, should try to control or prevent allergic outbreaks, said Dr. Miranda Curtiss, an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School...

    It's a good idea to get children outside every day, but especially on Kids to Parks Day, a national day of outdoor play on May 21.

    "Even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, outdoor time and nature exploration are safe for most kids," pediatrician Dr. Danette Glassy said in an ...

    Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

    So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

    By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    Pollution from varied sources caused 9 million deaths worldwide in 2019, accounting for 1 in 6 of all deaths, a new study says.

    Of those pollution-related deaths, three-quarters -- close to 7 million -- were caused by outdoor or indoor air pollution. Toxic chemical pollution (including lead) caused 1.8...

    More than 50,000 premature deaths would be prevented in the United States each year if fine particle air pollution from the burning of fossil fuels were eliminated, researchers say.

    Curbing this source of pollution would also save more than $600 billion a year in health care costs due to related illness and death, their

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 17, 2022
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