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Health News Results - 354

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans will enjoy a hot, nutritious Thanksgiving meal thanks to their local food pantry, often staffed by volunteers. Now, new research spotlights just how important these charities are.

Families who rely on pantries for food assistance come away with $600 to $1,000 in free meals and produce every year, after...

Whether you survive a bout with cancer may depend, in part, on where you live.

Researchers at the American Cancer Society and Clemson University in South Carolina found a 20% higher death rate for all cancer types in the communities with the most racial and economic segregation.

For lung cancer, the death rate was 50% higher in the most segregated counties.

"Many people livin...

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- One in 5 privately insured American adults hospitalized for a traumatic injury end up with medical bills they can't pay, a new study finds.

Among more than 3,100 working-aged insured adults who suffered a traumatic injury, the risk of incurring co-pays and deductibles they couldn't afford was 23% higher than among similar adult...

In a finding that challenges the notion that immigrants are freeloaders in the American health care system, a new study shows they are paying a lot more through health care premiums and related taxes than they actually use in care.

In fact, the amount that immigrants pay in makes up for some of the amount of health care that non-immigrants use in excess of what they pay.

“Some p...

A new analysis illustrates the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade: In numerous states, women now have no choice but to travel long distances to get an abortion.

One-third of American women of reproductive age must now drive excessive distances, the researchers reported. Twice as many women must now travel more than an hour to get abortion care. And some ar...

Child tax credits had a huge impact in U.S. households that struggle to afford food.

And after those credits ended, many...

The pandemic brought about a lot of changes in people's lives. For many, that included a new baby.

The United States saw a “baby bump” in 2021 described in a new study as “the first major reversal in declining U.S. fertility rates since 2007.”

It was the opposite of what early forecasts predicted.

“Ther...

The key to narrowing the gap in how long a person lives if they're poor vs. if they're wealthy could be as simple as adding green space to certain neighborhoods.

Every 10% increase in natural space and private gardens was linked to a 7% drop in early deaths in people younger than 65, according to a new study published Oct. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. <...

As some workplaces have added robots to the crew, workers in the United States and parts of Asia are feeling uneasy.

Concerns about robots also happen even in industries where they're not used yet, according to new research.

“Some economists theorize that robots are more likely to take over blue-collar jobs faster than whit...

Many Americans with heart disease also have limited access to food, and this dangerous combination is growing rapidly, a new study finds.

"Food insecurity is a common problem...

Home ownership may be the culmination of the American Dream, but a new study cautions that many people think they will be happier than they actually become once they are king or queen of their own castle.

“We wanted to investigate whether home buyers correctly predict the long-term impac...

Five years back, “Nugget” the Jack-A-Poo was in serious need of some tender loving veterinary care.

“He needed vaccinations and a few other things,” Seattle native Grace Stroklund recalled of her sidekick, a Jack Russell Terrier/Toy Poodle mix. “But I was just not in the wheelhouse financially to do any of that.”

At 23, Stroklund was struggling with her own challenges. H...

While many older Americans are experiencing sticker shock when they shop for food, lower-income and less-healthy adults are hurting the most, a new poll reveals.

Three-quarters of respondents in the latest University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging said the price of groceries has affected them somewhat or a lot. Ab...

Weeks after a stay in the hospital, your bill arrives and you can barely believe the amount due. How is this even possible if you have good health insurance and, more importantly, how will you pay it?

Unfortunately, you're not alone. More than one in 10 American adults and nearly one in five U.S. households have

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 19, 2022
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  • As Americans age, millions end up struggling with dementia or some level of memory impairment and diminished capacity to think clearly and make decisions.

    Yet a new study says that despite such serious challenges, many seniors continue to manage their own finances, often alone, and despite a...

    Researchers working to better understand the diets of younger women with disabilities found this group was more likely to report a poor diet and food insecurity.

    "Eating a nutritious diet is central to preventing many chronic diseases. For women of reproductive age, a healthy diet can also...

    America's middle-income seniors could face a time of financial reckoning within the next decade, with the rising costs of health care and assisted living overwhelming their meager savings, a new study reports.

    The number of middle-income seniors in the United States is expected to nearly double by 2033, with 16 million people 75 or older making too much to qualify for government assistanc...

    Access to paid sick leave saves lives, new research shows.

    The U.S. study found that when local laws required employers to provide paid sick leave, lower death rates from homicide, suicide and alcohol-related causes resulted.

    The researchers also believe that recent upticks in death rates -- up 6% between 2010 and 2017 -- among U.S. workers likely stem from state preemption laws, wh...

    In yet another example of the financial toll that the new coronavirus has exacted during the pandemic, a new report estimates that up to 4 million Americans are out of work as they struggle with long COVID.

    "This is a shocking number," report auth...

    Vitamin D exposure, or lack of it, has long been thought to influence the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) because the disease is diagnosed more often in people in northern countries.

    However, new research suggests there might be an additional reas...

    Naloxone is a lifesaving antidote to an opioid overdose, but it may be priced too high for those most vulnerable to opioid-related death, a new study finds.

    Between 2014 and 2018, naloxone costs rose 500% for those without insurance, while out-of-pocket costs for the medication dropped 26% for people with i...

    Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

    The study — recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — looked at staffing before the COVID-19 pandemic. It f...

    U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

    The analysis showed that the greatest increases in unpaid absences were among low-income workers who were self-employed,...

    Inflation is putting Americans' health at risk, with nearly 2 in 5 struggling to pay for the care they need, according to a new West Health-Gallup poll.

    About 38% -- which translates to an estimated 98 million Americans -- said rising health care prices had caused them to skip treatments, delay buying prescription drugs or pay for their care by borrowing money or cutting back on driving, ...

    Where you live may affect your fertility, a new study suggests.

    People who live in economically deprived neighborhoods are about 20% less likely to conceive, compared to people from areas with more resources, researchers said.

    Investments in deprived neighbo...

    Financial pressures may have made this a year when some families can't afford pricy extras, such as after-school activities or summer camp.

    It's OK to explain this to your kids, said an expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who offered tips for the conversation, as well as low-cost alternatives for budget-friendly summer fun.

    “It's important to give an optimistic but ...

    They are called "forever chemicals" because they linger in the human body and can contribute to the risk of everything from cancer to childhood obesity.

    Now, new research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) finds they also exact a huge financial toll, costing the U.S. health system billions every year.

    ...

    Nearly all Americans are worried about inflation as economic worries oust COVID-19 as the nation's top source of stress, a new poll reveals.

    Nearly nine out of 10 Americans (87%) said they are anxious or very anxious about inflation, up 8 percentage points from the previous month, according to...

    Overall use of insulin pumps among U.S. youngsters with type 1 diabetes has climbed in recent decades, but those who are poor or from minority groups are less likely to have the devices, a new study finds.

    Insulin pumps, which do away with the need for numerous painful injections, have been shown to ...

    A form of diabetes caused by malnutrition is significantly different from type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be considered a distinct form of the disease, a new study says.

    The findings may prove crucial in developing effective treatme...

    If you're poor and have a severe type of heart attack, the chance you'll live through it is significantly lower than that of someone with more money, new research shows.

    The finding underscores the need to close a divide in health care that hits low-income people hard, said lead researcher Dr. Abdul...

    Long-distance travel will likely prove a nearly insurmountable barrier to some women seeking abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned as expected, a new study concludes.

    Women who need an abortion are more than twice as likely to delay the procedure or decide to continue their pregnancy if they live 50 or more miles from a clinic, compared with women who live within 5 miles of a clinic,

    Young adults who struggle to afford food face an increased risk of diabetes later in life, possibly due to the long-term effects of eating cheaper, less nutritious food.

    That's the conclusion of researchers who analyz...

    If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

    "If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better environment for the treatment to be effective than if you're going to a poor neighborhood with other problems," said stu...

    U.S. cancer survivors under age 65 with medical-related financial struggles have an increased risk of early death, a new study finds.

    "Our findings show the need to address financ...

    In yet another sign that climate change strikes the poorest without mercy, a new study shows that low-income people have a 40% higher exposure to heat than those with higher incomes.

    By the end of the century, heat wave exposure for the poorest 25% people worldwide will equal the rest of the global population combined. That's after ...

    Hospitalizations for dangerously high blood pressure more than doubled in the United States from 2002 to 2014, new research shows.

    This jump in hospitalizations for what's called a "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 1, 2022
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  • U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

    Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the verge of critical staffing shortages, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA). In 12 states, 40% or more of ...

    Homelessness is difficult enough, but when it's compounded by serious mental health issues the result can be an inability to function at even the most basic level.

    Sometimes that leads to round-the-clock involuntary hospitalization, and when that happens a state-appointed psychiatric conservator can take over, making critical health care decisions for a person deemed mentally unstable.

    The chance of someone who is covered by Medicaid surviving cancer may depend in part on where they live, a new analysis finds.

    In states that had lower Medicaid income eligibility limits, cancer survival rates were worse for cancers both in early and late stages compared to states with higher Medicaid income eligibility limits, Amer...

    Many insured cancer patients still experience serious money problems linked to their illness, new research affirms.

    For example, nearly 3 out of 4 insured patients with colon cancer have major financial hardship in the year after their diagnosis, which affects their social functioning and quality of life, according to

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2022
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  • When a sick child spends time in the intensive care unit, the impact lasts even after the hospital stay is over.

    Added to it are days, weeks, sometimes months out of school for the young patient and extended work absences for their primary caregivers.

    "Pediatric critical illness impacts a family's health and well-being not only during the child's treatment but after they leave the ...

    Economic status appears linked to increased risk of being born with a cleft palate or lip, new research suggests, building on past evidence that it can also result in delayed care and poorer outcomes.

    Cleft palate and cleft lip are the terms that describe openings or split...

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...

    Fewer Americans are dying prematurely from heart attack compared with years ago, but progress has stalled out in the past decade, new research shows.

    For the study, the researchers examined 20 years of data on heart attack deaths among Americans under 65 -- deaths that are considered "premature."

    The bigger picture looked good: Between 1999 and 2019, those deaths declined by 52%.

    A new program to boost the supply of cancer medicines for children in low- and middle-income countries has been announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    The hospital is making a six-year, $200 million investment to launch the Global Platform for Access to Childhood C...

    Many parents want to make the holiday season magical for their kids, but for some the stress they feel trying to live up to that ideal may actually be doing the opposite.

    A poll from Michigan Medicine found that about 1 in 5 parents said their ...

    While strokes and related deaths have declined in rich nations, they remain stubbornly high worldwide, a new study says.

    Author Liyuan Han attributed the overall decreases to "better medical services in high-income countries, which may offer earlier detection of stroke risk factors and better control" of them.

    “But even in these countries, the total number of people with

  • Robert Preidt
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  • December 16, 2021
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  • "Medicare For All" gets tossed around a lot by advocates of universal health coverage, but a new study finds that today's Medicare is far from free for seniors and people with disabilities.

    Instead, a large number of beneficiaries are sliding into medical debt and delaying needed health care due to financial holes in the system, according to findings published online Dec. 10 in

    Here's a social distancing strategy that really worked in the early days of the pandemic: New research shows that providing hotel rooms to homeless people at high risk for severe COVID-19 significantly lowered their chance of infection.

    In early April 2020, the city of Chicago made 200 rooms at a hotel available to homeless people in shelters who were considered at high risk because they ...