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Fetal exposure to fluoride from a mom-to-be's drinking water might raise the odds for physical and mental health issues in toddlers, new research suggests.

The study, which was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect. However, researchers believe the findings are worth investigating further.

“This is the first U.S.-based study ...

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it has finalized a first-ever rule that will drastically lower the amount of PFAS, also known as "forever chemicals," in the nation's drinking water.

“Drinking water contaminated with PFAS has plagued communities across this country for too long,” EPA Administrator

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 10, 2024
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  • As waters warm across the United States and hurricanes and flooding season begins, the odds of being infected by flesh-eating bacteria are also rising, U.S. health officials warn.

    According to a Sept. 1 health alert from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a dozen types of the bacteria called <...

    The Biden administration on Monday awarded $58 million in grants to help schools and daycare centers remove lead from drinking water.

    The announcement came during an event in Boston.

    “I am excited to join local leaders in Boston to announce $58 million in grant funding that can be used to test for lead in drinking water, identify potential sources, and remove those so...

    Under the surface of your favorite swimming pool, beach and lakes, hazards too small to be seen by the naked eye may await.

    And these bacteria, viruses and parasites can turn a refreshing plunge into a nasty infection.

    “There's a variety of microorganisms that can make recreational activities in water less than fun,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 4, 2023
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  • Drowning is the leading cause of death among children aged 1 to 4 years old in the United States, and too many older children continue to die in the water, according to a new report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

    A child can slip underwater in the seconds it takes a parent to send a text message. Or while a caregiver turns away to pick up a smartphone.

    “...

    Summer is here and so, too, is swimming season.

    As fun as a pool can be, it's also a major safety risk if you don't take the appropriate precautions.

    An expert from Huntington Health, an affiliate of Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, offers some tips for a safe pool season.

    “If children or non-experienced swimmers will be in the pool, it's very important to have adult supervis...

    A potentially deadly germ has made its way to the U.S. Gulf Coast, health officials warned this week.

    So far, three cases of infection from the bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bacteria causes melioidosis, which can be fatal if left untreated.

    "It is an environmental organism that lives natural...

    Be cautious when heading to Florida's beaches this summer, an expert warned, as a 5,000-mile floating mass of sargassum seaweed has begun washing up on the state's shores.

    It can be low risk in some instances, but it also has the potential for triggering serious respiratory health issues.

    “The sargassum itself is not dangerous. It can have different jellyfish and sea creatures i...

    Black and Hispanic communities in the United States are more often poor — and also more likely to have harmful levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in their drinking water, a new study reveals.

    Sources of PFAS pollution — including major manufacturers, airports, military bases, wastewater treatment plants and landfills — are disproportionately sited near watersheds t...

    Drowning isn't always accompanied by the stereotypical flailing and cries for help.

    It can happen wherever there's water, including streams, lakes, water parks, bathtubs and even toilets.

    It's also often preventable, according to an expert from Penn State Health, who offered tips for parents as water recreation season begins.

    “A child can drown in less than 2 inches of water...

    Global warming is fostering the spread of a deadly flesh-eating bacteria along the northeastern coast of the United States, researchers report.

    Vibrio vulnificus bacteria grow in warm shallow coastal waters and can infect a person via a cut or insect bite during contact with seawater. The bacteria is found as far north as Philadelphia and is spreading even further north as ocean...

    U.S. water utilities will be required to remove certain “forever chemicals” from drinking water as the Biden administration sets first-ever limits on perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl compounds, better known as known as PFAS.

    Nearly all Americans have PFAS in their bloodstream. The toxic chemicals are found in an enormous range of goods from dental floss to waterproof clothing. The c...

    Researchers studying well water found current monitoring practices often fail to reflect actual groundwater pollution risks.

    The problem: Spikes in harmful bacteria, like those from animal and human waste, vary depending on the season. They may be higher at times when testing is less likely to be done.

    “This is concerning because many residents and homeowners across the country, i...

    It's a little safer to get into the water: Unprovoked shark attacks dropped to a 10-year low worldwide in 2022, shark watchers say.

    A total of 57 unprovoked bites occurred in 2022, tying with 2020 for the fewest number of reported incidents during the last 10 years, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File.

    Of those attacks, five were fatal -- do...

    U.S. communities with higher Hispanic, American Indian or Black populations also have the highest concentrations of metal in public water systems, new research reveals.

    Researchers from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City found significantly higher arsenic and uranium levels in public drinking water in Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native communities...

    Black children and teens drown in swimming pools at rates seven times higher than white children, but a new survey suggests that special swimming programs could make a difference and help save lives.

    The survey, from the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, found that only 25% of Hispanic parents and 28% of Black parents were comfortable with their own swimming ski...

    Splash pads -- those shallow pools of wet, cooling summertime fun for kids -- can also be sources of nasty gastro infections for youngsters who swallow water during their play.

    That's the take-home lesson from a new analysis of outbreaks of two bacterial illnesses, shigellosis and

  • By Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2022
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  • When weather gets hot and people start jumping into a pool, lake or ocean, cases of swimmer's ear are likely to climb, but one expert says there are steps you can take to avoid the painful condition.

    The best prevention is a simple one: avoid getting water in your ears, s...

    Neck floats marketed for babies to use in water can lead to serious injury or death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned this week.

    The inflatable plastic rings are especially dangerous for infants who have developmental delays or special needs, such as those with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy...

    Many children missed out on potentially lifesaving swimming lessons during the pandemic, so parents should enroll them in classes as soon as possible, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends.

    "Drowning is the single leading cause of injury death for children ages 1 to 4, and it's one of the top causes ...

    Hundreds of U.S. children die in pool and hot tub drownings each year, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging parents to redouble safety efforts this summer.

    That's because many children have been away from the water during the past two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    "Child drowning rates and nonfatal drowning injuries among children under 15 years old...

    When you're at a beach or pool, would you be able to identify someone who's drowning and take action to save them?

    "Even the most experienced swimmers can be in danger if the weather is bad, currents are strong or a medical emergency occurs in the water," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). "Most drowning accidents are preventable, b...

    If heading back into the water this summer has you concerned about flesh-eating bacteria, an expert offers some advice.

    "Flesh-eating bacteria refers to an infection that spreads so rapidly that the skin and surrounding soft tissue starts to die," explained Dr. Stacey Rose, an assistan...

    With summer comes warm weather and swimming. But for some people, knowing how to swim may not be enough to ensure their safety.

    That's because certain medical conditions bump up the risk for drowning in a big way, according to a new Canadian study.

    About one in three adults and children over age 10 who drowned in Canada between 2007 and 2016 had a chronic health condition, the stud...

    Fracking has already raised the ire of environmentalists for its effects on the planet, but new research sends up another red flag: The wastewater produced by the complicated oil and gas drilling process is loaded with toxic and cancer-causing contaminants that threaten both people and wildlife.

    In fracking, water tha...

    Enforcement of a rule limiting power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous pollutants will be resumed, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Monday.

    It's the latest move by the Biden administration to reinstate environmental protections lifted by the Trump administration.

    "The science is clear: we must limit mercury and toxic air pollution to protect our kids a...

    In an effort to further lower lead levels in drinking water, the Biden administration on Thursday announced $2.9 billion in infrastructure bill funds for lead pipe removal and tighter lead limits.

    The new, tougher limits to be imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are expected to be finalized by 2024 and would require the replacement of remaining lead drinking water pipes a...

    Health officials say they are trying to track down the source of 10 reported cases of Legionnaires' disease within a one-mile radius in a Long Island, N.Y., neighborhood.

    The patients range in age from 35 to 96. As of Saturday, one had died, two remained hospitalized and seven had been released from the hospital, CBS News reported.

    Legionnaires is a rare form of pneumonia c...

    A drowning child has a much lower risk of severe disability or death if a bystander steps in, even without cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), new research finds.

    "Bystanders play a critical role in preventing poor outcomes in childhood drowning by instituting safe, early and effective rescue and resuscitation of pediatric drowning victims," said author Dr. Rohit Shenoi, an attending phy...

    The rings of stately pines on the coasts of North and South Carolina offer telling long-term evidence of climate change and a chilling forecast for the future.

    The upshot: The last 300 years have gotten wetter and wetter, making hurricanes ever more dangerous.

    "Our findings suggest that the maximum amount of rainfall from these storms is increasing and is likely going to continue to...

    If you're at the beach or pool, applying sunscreen before and after you've been in the water is a must, a cancer specialist says.

    The intensity of exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays "is higher under water than it is above water," said Dr. Arun Mavanur. He is a surgical oncologist at the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute at LifeBridge Health, in Baltimore.

    "UV rays also ar...

    There's some good news as millions of American children head back to the nations' lakes, beaches and pools: Newly released numbers for 1999 through 2019 show steady progress in reducing the number of young lives lost to drowning.

    "Over the past two decades, the rate of unintentional drowning deaths among children aged 0 to 17 years declined 38%, from 1.6 per 100,000 in 1999 to 1.0 in 2019...

    The best way to prevent drowning in children and teens is to guard against the danger on multiple fronts, a leading pediatricians' group says.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released its "Prevention of Drowning" report online this week, which notes that about 70% of drowning deaths for U.S. children aged 15 and younger occur between May and August.

    The report includes the ...

    Cost and lack of time are among the reasons parents don't enroll their kids in swimming lessons, a new survey finds.

    "Swimming is one of the most important life-saving skills that children and adults should master. Whether for fun or for exercise, swimming will serve them well for the rest of their lives, and it's never too early to start learning," said Dr. Matthew Davis, chair of medici...

    As you seek to cool down in a pool or at the beach this summer, always keep water safety for yourself and others in mind, an expert urges.

    "With children, I always recommend starting swim lessons at an early age and having parents put on floaties or life vests on their children when near any water. Parents should also never let their kids swim alone without supervision and ensure they're ...

    It's the first holiday since the pandemic began where Americans can mingle without masks if they are fully vaccinated, so celebrations are in order. But folks still need to avoid alcohol if they're driving or boating over the Memorial Day weekend.

    "This Memorial Day weekend, as we honor our nation's heroes who sacrificed their lives to protect ours, please remember to keep yourselves and ...

    If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

    Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

    Hurricane season in North America runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has ...

    Poor and minority Americans are most likely to lose access to clean tap water as droughts become more common and severe, a new paper says.

    Water service in the United States is delivered by tens of thousands of community systems, most of which are small and funded locally, according to the study.

    More than 80% of the 50,000-plus U.S. community water systems delivering wa...

    The mystery of "stinging water" has been solved, scientists say.

    Stinging water is the seawater near and around upside-down jellyfish (Cassiopea) -- and swimmers can get stinging, itchy skin while submerged in it, even if they have no direct contact with the creatures themselves.

    But it wasn't clear in the past if the jellyfish were to blame for this discomfort, since...

    If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

    Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

    The res...

    Drowning death rates at public beaches, lakes and rivers are three to four times lower in states with tighter rules for swimming in such locations, a new U.S. study finds.

    Researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to focus on the 20 states with the highest rates and the 10 states with the lowest rates of drowning deaths among people over age 5. Open wat...

    Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

    Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

    The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water systems in violation fell from 1.3% in 2008 ...

    With category 3 Hurricane Dorian ravaging the Bahamas as it lumbers toward the east coast of Florida,the National Safety Council offered anyone in its path steps to stay safe.

    First, the council urges residents to monitor Dorian's progress and heed government warnings.

    It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need during any severe weather. Families should have...

    It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.

    Climate change is making this terrifying scenario more common in the northern part of the United States, one infectious disease expert says.

    These infections are caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. There are about 80,000 such infections each year in the United Sta...

    Fluoride exposure from drinking water during pregnancy could be making children less intelligent, a new Canadian study argues.

    Expectant moms with higher levels of fluoride in their urine tended to have kids with lower average IQs, based on a study of 601 mother-child pairs from six cities in Canada.

    On average, a 1 milligram-per-liter increase in maternal urinary fluoride w...

    Your dog bounds heedlessly into a local lake or pond, playfully splashing in the water.

    But within minutes, your canine companion is staggering, drooling or suffering seizures. Left untreated, the dog will likely die.

    This fate has befallen a handful of pooches exposed to toxic algae blooms this year, experts say.

    "Blue-green algae is a bacteria that during certain...

    A flesh-eating bacteria has migrated into the Delaware Bay between Delaware and New Jersey, drawn north by the warmer waters of climate change, doctors say.

    Five cases of infection with Vibrio vulnificus occurred in 2017 and 2018 along the Delaware Bay, compared to one infection with the devastating bacteria in the eight years prior, researchers said.

    The infections r...

    Nicole and Jonathan Hughes, a teacher and a physician with three young children, were acutely aware of the dangers of swimming pools and lakes. From fenced-off pools to life jackets to constant supervision, they did everything right.

    Tragedy struck anyway.

    Last June, as the family was about to head to an Alabama beach for an evening crab hunt, 3-year-old Levi somehow slipp...

    Levels of antibiotics in some of the world's rivers are hundreds of times higher than what's considered safe, British researchers report.

    For the new study, investigators checked rivers in 72 countries on six continents for 14 widely used antibiotics and found them at 65% of monitored sites.

    "The results are quite eye-opening and worrying, demonstrating the widespread co...