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07 Feb

Calling a Food 'Light' in Calories May Backfire

A new study finds people eat more when a meal is labeled ‘light’ as opposed to ‘filling’.

Health News Results - 150

If you have both asthma and seasonal allergies, there are ways to reduce the impacts of that double whammy, an expert says.

People with asthma, a chronic lung condition, should try to control or prevent allergic outbreaks, said Dr. Miranda Curtiss, an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Schoo...

Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

Planet Earth is growing hotter, forcing different animal species to migrate to new areas and interact with other unfamiliar creatures at an increasing rate.

That phenomenon could have dire consequences to human health, a new study says, raising the odds for new viral illnesses such

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 28, 2022
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  • Warm summer nights may leave you tossing and turning in bed, but that could be the least of your worries. Just a slight rise in summer nighttime temperatures increases the risk of heart-related death for men in their 60s, a new study shows.

    "Considering the growing likelihood of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Climate change is prompting longer pollen seasons and higher pollen counts, which spells trouble for people with seasonal allergies, allergists warn.

    "Allergy seasons have been changing in North America and across the globe, and we see greater changes the further you get from the equator," explained Dr. Kara Wada, an allergis...

    An increase in heat waves driven by climate change is causing hundreds more heart disease deaths in the United States each year, with men and Black people at particular risk, researchers say.

    Each year, the United States now has about three times as many heat waves as in the 1960s. Heat can put increased strain on the heart and trigger heart attacks and other cardiac problems.

    "Thes...

    U.S. wildfires have become larger, more frequent and more widespread in the past two decades, and the situation will become even worse in the future, a new study warns.

    “Projected changes in climate, fuel and ignitions suggest that we’ll see more and larger fires in the future,” ...

    A spike in hospitalizations for a dangerous low-salt condition is the latest in a growing list of health threats linked to climate change.

    An average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit could lead to a 14% increase in hospitalizations for critically low sodium levels in the blood, a condition called hyponatremia, according to a

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  • March 14, 2022
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  • From drowning to being struck by flying debris, the immediate dangers of hurricanes are well known, but these events also boost your risk of dying from a host of hidden diseases and conditions that occur in the storm's aftermath.

    The new research is concerning given the increase in t...

    Never mind what the calendar says -- your plants will tell you when spring is here.

    And even in Northern regions, they're leafing out earlier than ever in recent decades due to climate change. In a new study, researchers attribute the early greening to two key factors: warmer temperatures and fewer rainy days...

    Extreme heat from climate change is making it harder for people with mental illness and drug addiction to cope and adding to pressure on pandemic-stretched U.S. emergency rooms.

    During these severe summer temperature spikes, Americans with depression, anxiety, mood disorders and drug addiction are increasingly flocking to hospital ERs for help, a

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • With winter storms roaring through much of the United States this week, millions of Americans may face power outages that could put them at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires as they try to keep warm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    When the power goes out, many people use portable generators or other devices for heat and power, but improper use of such equipme...

    Tempted to take your workout into the great outdoors?

    Be aware that there are both benefits and risks to exercising outdoors during the winter.

    “There’s actually some advantages to working out in cold weather -- with no heat and humidity to deal with you may ...

    Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

    Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately before.

    The pattern is not surprising, said lead researc...

    Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    If you think frequent changes in weather are triggering your allergy symptoms, you may be right.

    A shift from a cold front to a rainy day then back to warm weather can have an impact on those with allergies, said Dr. David Corry, professor of medicine-immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Medicine, in ...

    While climate change calls to mind extreme weather and melting polar ice caps, government officials' inaction to stop it is also affecting the mental health of young people, new research reveals.

    "This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young peo...

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    Summer can sizzle in the city, but a new report finds urban living is getting hotter than ever before.

    The research shows that city dwellers may be suffering from what scientists call an urban ...

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

    The deadly tornadoes that devastated communities in multiple states this past weekend have destroyed many homes and left others without power.

    But if people turn to generators to manage in the aftermath, they should use caution, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Portable generators can expose users to increased risk of

  • Cara Murez
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  • December 15, 2021
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  • If you're getting together with others outdoors, a windy day might be best, researchers say.

    The investigators found that when people socialize outside, the risk of coronavirus infection is as much as 45% greater when there's hardly any breeze than when there are stronger winds.

    "The issue is really about an increased danger of infection spread in the presence of stale air as oppose...

    Extreme heat brings a jump in emergency room visits by adults of all ages, a new study shows.

    While it's well known that extreme heat puts adults aged 65 and older at increased risk of hospitalization and death, it's been less clear how it affects young and middle-aged adults.

    To find out, the researchers analyzed the associations between heat and ER visits among more than 74 millio...

    While climate change gets a lot of notice for its numerous negative impacts around the globe, children's allergies may not be among them.

    Despite climate change, with the longer growing seasons and larger pollen loads that are attributed to it, more than 5,800 children in the Los Angeles area with asthma did not have an increase in allergic sensitization or allergy diagnosis over a 15-yea...

    Contaminated water is the leading cause of large-scale outbreaks of infectious diseases that can be transmitted from animals to people, researchers say.

    These health threats are called zoonotic infectious diseases, and recent outbreaks include COVID-19 and Ebola.

    "In the age of COVID-19, it is understandable that many people may not realize how many outbreaks of other infectious dis...

    Global warming may pose a threat to your kidneys, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from hospitals in more than 1,800 cities in Brazil between 2000 and 2015, and found that just over 7% of all admissions for kidney disease could be attributed to hotter temperatures.

    That equates to more than 202,000 cases of kidney disease, according to the report publi...

    Climate change is already making Americans sick and researchers warn that the nation must take swift action to protect people's well-being.

    "Climate change effects aren't just an abstraction, something that will happen years from now. They are happening today, and they impact every aspect of your health, from the air you breathe [more smoke, more pollen] to the nutritional quality of the ...

    You're driving down the highway when a tornado warning is issued over your car radio. Is it safe to follow widespread advice and seek shelter under an overpass?

    While the U.S. National Weather Service warns that the wind from a tornado can accelerate as it flows under the overpass, creating a wind tunnel effect, a new study found differently.

    "In our research, there is no one findin...

    You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

    In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

    As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

    Urban dwellers around the globe are sweating through three times as many "extreme heat" days as their counterparts did in the 1980s, a new study suggests.

    The study is the latest to chart humans' growing exposure to dangerously high temperatures. Experts said it looked at what's happening in finer detail than previous research has -- and it suggests that exposure to extreme heat is more w...

    The rings of stately pines on the coasts of North and South Carolina offer telling long-term evidence of climate change and a chilling forecast for the future.

    The upshot: The last 300 years have gotten wetter and wetter, making hurricanes ever more dangerous.

    "Our findings suggest that the maximum amount of rainfall from these storms is increasing and is likely going to continue to...

    Nuclear war would trigger worldwide climate change and take a dire toll on food production and human health, according to scientists who studied different scenarios using a modern climate model.

    "Although we suspected that ozone would be destroyed after nuclear war and that would result in enhanced ultraviolet light at the Earth's surface, if there was too much smoke, it would block out t...

    It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

    "They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

    Along with other dangers, the aftermath of Hurricane Ida could pose significant heart health risks.

    Stress and trauma from the storm that slammed into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and other states could increase heart risk, and the impact may be more significant for heart disease and stroke patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    For example, it may be more difficul...

    This summer has brought dangerous, record-breaking heat to parts of the United States and Canada. The hot weather poses an extra challenge for pregnant women.

    Mothers-to-be need to stay cool to avoid heat exhaustion and its complications, according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston.

    "The summer is tough on pregnant women because the body struggles to cool down w...

    Extreme heat strikes poor and minority neighborhoods in U.S. cities harder than those that are wealthier and mainly white, a new study finds.

    "The distribution of excess urban heat varies within cities, and as a result, communities do not share a city's extreme heat burden equally," said study co-author Jennifer Burney. She's chair of global climate policy and research at the University o...

    Climate change could put billions more people at risk for deadly mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue, researchers said. They see the danger zone expanding within the United States, Europe and Asia.

    If temperatures rise by about 3.7 degrees Celsius by the year 2100 compared to pre-industrial levels, 4.7 billion more people globally may be at risk for the diseases compared to...

    Climate change has already become deadly enough to cause 5 million extra deaths worldwide each year, researchers report.

    "This is the first study to get a global overview of mortality due to non-optimal temperature conditions between 2000 and 2019, the hottest period since the pre-industrial era," said study co-leader Yuming Guo, a professor at Monash University in Australia.

    The fi...

    Sunscreen isn't just for pool gatherings and beach outings: Using sunscreen every day could reduce your risk of skin cancer, experts say.

    Daily use of at least an SPF 15 sunscreen can lower your risk of melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer -- by 50%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

    If you spend most of your day indoors, SPF 15 should provide adequate protection, bu...

    On sizzling hot summer days, it's important to guard against heat exhaustion and heat stroke, an expert says.

    "Heat stroke occurs when the core temperature of the body reaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and changes in our central nervous system take place, such as disorientation, confusion, behavioral or emotional changes or altered mental status," said Isabel Valdez, a physician assistant an...

    Could trees be the key to a cool summer in the city?

    Yes, claims new research that calculated just how much greenery can bring temperatures down.

    "We've long known that the shade of trees and buildings can provide cooling," said study co-author Jean-Michel Guldmann. He is a professor emeritus of city and regional planning at Ohio State University, in Columbus.

    "But now we can...

    In normal times, a sunny day can lift your mood while a stormy one can darken it, but new British research shows that weather had little effect on people's spirits during the pandemic.

    "We know that lockdown restrictions, and the resulting impact on social life and the economy, are linked to at least two major negative public health consequences -- a reduction in physical exercise, both i...

    Human-caused global warming is responsible for more than one-third of heat-related deaths worldwide, but the proportion is much higher in certain countries, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data gathered between 1991 and 2018 from 732 locations in 43 countries. They concluded that 37% of all heat-related deaths in recent summer periods were attributable to the warming of the planet...

    Rising temperatures caused by climate change could trigger a worldwide increase in stillbirths, researchers warn.

    The team at the University of Queensland in Australia analyzed 12 studies on the subject. They found that exposure to extremely high temperatures throughout pregnancy appeared to increase risk of stillbirth, particularly late in pregnancy.

    "Overall, risk of stillbirth ap...

    If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

    Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

    Hurricane season in North America runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has ...

    Increasing numbers of wildfires are making poor air quality more common throughout the Western United States, according to a new study.

    The findings suggest that many cities may soon have trouble meeting air quality standards, said lead author Kai Wilmot, a doctoral student in atmospheric sciences at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

    Wilmot's team examined Western air qualit...

    The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

    "Our results for a business-as-usual pathway indicate that, especially in the second half of this century, unprecedented super- an...

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