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Results for search "Education".

07 Feb

Education Level and Dementia

Does having a higher level of education help prevent dementia?

Health News Results - 101

Young Americans who live in urban areas or live with low income or low education levels are more likely to die if they get colon cancer, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of disparities in health care," said lead investigator Dr. Ashley Matusz-Fisher, an internist at the Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, N.C. "It is important to look at the sociodemographic disparities so that w...

Some groups of American teens are more likely than others to view e-cigarettes as a health threat, a new study suggests.

That list includes girls, whites, LGBTQ teens, teens living in the suburbs, and those from more affluent and better-educated families.

Vaping rates among U.S. teens are high. More than 1 in 4 high school students regularly use e-cigarettes, and the number...

How teens see their family's social status may play a part in their mental health and success at school, a new study suggests.

Social status appears to be more important than what their parents do for a living, how much money they have or how educated they are, the researchers said.

"The amount of financial resources children have access to is one of the most reliable pred...

It may be possible to predict a child's chances of academic success at birth, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that kids' genes and their parents' education and wealth were big predictors of school success.

They analyzed data from 5,000 children born in the U.K. between 1994 and 1996, including test results at key stages of their education and their parents' wealth and ...

Smartphones, tablets and laptops are everywhere, and young children are fascinated by them. Now, new research suggests that parents might be able to harness that curiosity and use apps on the devices to boost early learning.

The review found that apps could be particularly useful for teaching early math and language skills.

"Screen time is here,...

Girls and boys have no differences in brain function or math ability, according to researchers who used imaging to analyze kids' brain development.

The study is the latest to debunk the common myth that women are less suited to work in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields due to biological shortfalls in math aptitude, the researchers said.

"Science ...

Could illiteracy up your odds for dementia?

That's the suggestion of a study that found seniors who couldn't read or write were two to three times more likely to develop dementia than those who could.

The finding "provides strong evidence for a link between illiteracy and dementia risk," said study author Jennifer Manly, a professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University'...

Higher levels of education may counter the genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease among older black adults, a new study indicates.

"This suggests that education can buffer the effects of the APOE e4 gene on episodic memory retention and working memory, which are usually the first types of memory to be affected in people with Alzheimer's," said study first author Jet Vonk. She is a postdo...

THURSDAY, Oct. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek is turning his battle with pancreatic cancer into advocacy, partnering with the World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition to issue a public service announcement (PSA) aimed at heightening awareness of the killer disease.

The aim of the video PSA is to "help raise global awareness of the risks and symptoms of pancreatic ...

Here's a finding that should prompt parents to crack down on their kids' screen time at night: New research shows that close to one-third of American children don't get sufficient sleep.

That lack of sleep makes it harder for kids to learn and to behave well when challenged.

"It's important for parents to recognize the widespread impact of not getting enough sleep, and...

There's a healthy new twist in the farm-to-table movement: Getting farm-fresh food to school lunchrooms and even having students grow their own crops as part of learning.

Colorado was a pioneer in passing the "Farm-to-School Healthy Kids Act" in 2010. The move was designed to increase the use of local farm and ranch products in school food service programs to both improve childhood nu...

College kids who get good shuteye may stand a better chance of making the Dean's list, a new study finds.

"The fact that there was a correlation between sleep and performance wasn't surprising, but the extent of it was," said researcher Jeffrey Grossman. He's a professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

It...

Offering more vegetarian choices in school cafeterias significantly cuts meat consumption without hurting overall sales, British researchers report.

In more than 94,000 college cafeteria choices studied, doubling vegetarian options (from 1 in 4 choices to 2 in 4) reduced purchases of meaty meals by 40-80%.

"Replacing some meat or fish with more vegetarian options might ...

Parents can relax a little about how much time their kids spend in front of screens, new research suggests.

A large review of the scientific evidence on the topic concluded that media time overall is not associated with the academic performance of children or teens.

But the more time kids spend watching TV or playing video games, the more likely their grades will suffer, the...

If a child can't sit still or blurts out random thoughts in kindergarten or first grade, does the child have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Or is the youngster just not mature enough to sit still yet?

Both are possibilities, and whichever might be true, new research suggests that the youngest kids in class are being diagnosed with ADHD, intellectual disability and ev...

Make it fun, and they will learn.

That's the conclusion of a new Canadian study that analyzed a kindergarten teaching program that favors playful activities and socializing over sit-down lectures. In the end, the innovative program appeared to give kids a leg up on reading, writing and arithmetic.

At the same time, the approach appears to cut back on bullying, while helping...

Now that children are back in school, it's important to make sure they get enough shut-eye, sleep experts say.

"No matter the age, children report improved alertness, energy, mood and physical well-being when enjoying healthy, consistent sleep," said Dr. Ilene Rosen, past president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

"Back-to-school time provides families with ...

Taking courses online has made it easier for thousands of college students to meet their degree requirements, but this type of learning may hold the most benefit for people who are interested in continuing education throughout their lives.

Courses that let you explore a topic of interest or gain a new skill for work keep your mind sharp and could even pay off with a promotion. Being a...

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (Healthday News) -- Heading back to school can be especially stressful for children with autism and their parents, but preparation and establishing a routine can make it easier.

The Children's Hospital of Los Angeles has tips to help parents get a new school year off to a good start.

If time permits, ask to tour the school before classes resume. With pe...

Suicide continues to become more common in the United States, with rural areas hit hardest by this ongoing crisis of despair, a new study reports.

Deprivation, isolation and lack of access to mental health care all appear to be driving the crisis in rural America, said lead researcher Danielle Steelesmith. She's a postdoctoral fellow at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center in...

How long people stay in school may play a significant role in predicting how well those with coronary heart disease will fare, according to new research that linked lower levels of school completion with a higher risk of heart attack and death.

Education level has been known to influence people's risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The new study examines just how much of a fac...

Charter schools have been around for more than 25 years, yet many people know little about them or whether they're a smart option for their children. Created as a way to increase student achievement, the concept has its share of both critics and supporters.

By definition, a charter school is an independently managed public school that operates under a charter, or contract, approved by...

A wellness checklist to help the 20 million new students starting at U.S. colleges this fall is available from Ohio State University experts.

Checklist topics include exercise, healthy eating, stress management, organization, and mental and physical health. The checklist also outlines resources students should pinpoint when they arrive on campus, such as fitness facilities and health ...

The start of school is just around the corner, but a leading pediatricians' group warns that many kids entering kindergarten lack the skills they need to succeed in class.

To help parents get their young ones ready to start school, the American Academy of Pediatrics has just released a report on what helps boost success as well as what factors may hinder kids' school experience.

...

When a high school senior becomes a university freshman, change is the name of the game. A new school. New friendships. Even new ways of eating.

As healthy, home-cooked meals give way to a campus diet of beer and pizza, student waistlines tend to expand. But new research shows it is the waistlines of boys that expand the most.

"Males and females display different patterns of...

California's crackdown on childhood vaccination exemptions cut in half the percentage of kindergartners who didn't have their required immunizations, a new study shows.

The rate of kindergartners without up-to-date vaccinations decreased from around 10% in 2013 to about 5% in 2017, after California implemented a three-pronged strategy to improve immunization rates.

...

If you struggle with infertility, chances are you will be twice as likely to get treatment for the heartbreaking condition if you are white, college-educated or affluent.

So claims a new study that analyzed data from more than 2,500 women aged 20 to 44 who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2013 and 2016.

Nearly 12.5% of the wo...

New research offers a compelling case for staying in school: American adults who spent more time in the classroom as kids have a lower risk of heart disease.

"As a society, we should be thinking about investing in social policies to improve overall health and reduce health care costs," said study author Dr. Rita Hamad. She's an assistant professor of family and community medicine at ...

One-third of U.S. cancer survivors have chronic pain, and 1 in 6 have levels that restrict their daily activities, a new study finds.

"The prevalence of chronic pain and high impact chronic pain among cancer survivors in our study was almost double that in the general population, suggesting there are important unmet needs in the large and growing community of people with a history of ...

Many children have difficulty with learning at some point, but those with learning disabilities often have several specific and persistent signs, which can start in preschool years. Recognizing them as soon as possible allows a child to get needed help and make better progress.

General signs include difficulty with reading, writing, math skills, understanding or following directions, ...

Being smart and highly educated may not prevent Alzheimer's disease, but it appears to delay the disease's impact on everyday life, a new study suggests.

Researchers can't prove that that's the case, but their data suggests it might be.

"Our study was designed to look for trends, not prove cause and effect, but the major implication of our study is that exposure to educatio...

It's a no-brainer -- not getting enough sleep makes it harder for kids to learn. And a new study finds that starting school later in the morning can help teens be more alert during the day.

In 2017, the Cherry Creek School District in Greenwood Village, Colo., changed start times from 8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. for its middle school students and from 7:10 a.m. to 8:20 a.m. for high school ...

Exercise is important for all kids, because it boosts their overall health and wards off excess weight. But it holds added benefit for teens: According to a study in The Journal of Pediatrics, it improves their attention, which can help them do better in school.

The greatest payoff came from about an hour a day of moderate-to-vigorous activity, the study found. It seems that ...

Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

That meets the U.S. Department of ...

If you're taking a test, you might want to check the thermostat first.

Room temperature -- a frequent front in the battle of the sexes -- makes a difference in how men and women score on math and verbal tests, new research says.

Specifically, women scored higher when the temperature was warmer. Men did better when the room was cooler.

Many surveys have found women...

Up all night, stressing out, feeling pressured. Cramming for college finals can bring all that, plus have students reaching for fatty, sugary foods, a new study suggests.

"Stress has long been implicated in poor diet. People tend to report overeating and comfort eating foods high in fat, sugar and calories in times of stress," said study leader Nathalie Michels, from Ghent University,...

There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

For example, the difference between neighbor...

After-school activities help develop social skills and talent, but a new report finds that many kids are priced out of participating.

In fact, for 1 in 6 middle and high school students, costs are the prime reason for not taking part in these activities. And the poorest students are two times less likely to participate, compared with their better-off peers, researchers reported in a n...

Kids with poorly controlled asthma struggle in school, especially those who are ethnic minorities, a new study reports.

Researchers evaluated asthma and allergy status, lung function and school performance of 216 black, Hispanic (Latino) and white children in a U.S. city.

Those with a greater number of daily asthma symptoms had more absences, less school work completed and p...

Studies show that the earlier a child's school struggles are addressed, the better the outcome will be. So it's important for parents to tackle problems early on rather than ignore them or hope children will grow out of them.

It's often easy to spot a child who's having difficulty with addition or subtraction, but other learning issues can be harder to identify. Surprisingly, both wri...

Some schools offer breakfast in the classroom to ensure that hungry children start the day with a full stomach so they're ready to learn. But this may have an unintended consequence -- it may raise the risk of childhood obesity.

New research found that when kids in fourth through sixth grade were offered breakfast in the classroom at the start of the school day, the incidence of obes...

There are plenty of good reasons to seek a higher education, but avoiding Alzheimer's disease probably isn't one of them, new research suggests.

The study found that a person's level of education wasn't related to the onset of memory and thinking ("cognitive") troubles, or the rate at which dementia progressed.

"Education is related to cognitive growth in early life, but i...

While one in five kids may have a learning disability that requires one-on-one intervention, others may simply need to develop good study habits to improve their grades.

But good study habits don't always come easily or naturally. You can help your 'tween or teen develop them with a few easy steps, and save both of you hours of stress and arguments.

Organization is key. Usi...

Moving from one community to another can be difficult for everyone in the family, especially if leaving friends and relatives behind. But the problems can be magnified for kids who have to switch middle or high schools.

Studies show that, for high school students, moving just once in a 12-month period can cut in half the likelihood of their getting a high school diploma by age 25. And...

Sending report cards home from school on Fridays is linked to a surge in child abuse, a new study finds.

"It's a pretty astonishing finding," said lead study author Melissa Bright, a research scientist with the University of Florida's Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies.

"It's sad, but the good news is there's a simple intervention -- don't give rep...

Would delaying the start of school help sleep-deprived teens get more of the shut-eye they need?

Yes, suggests a Seattle experiment that assessed how adolescent sleep habits changed after the opening school bell shifted from 7:50 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

The result: high school students ended up clocking an extra 34 minutes of sleep per night, on average. Better yet, that was accom...

It's a college tradition to pull "all-nighters" during final exams. But students may get better grades if they simply go to bed early, two new studies suggest.

Researchers found that students who met an "8-hour sleep challenge" during finals week did better on their exams than those who slept less.

The results prove that the college ritual of "cramming" is not necessary for ...

Does being the youngest in the class up your child's odds of being erroneously diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

It might. New research suggests these kids appear to be about 30 percent more likely to receive a diagnosis of ADHD. However, it probably doesn't change a child's actual risk of developing ADHD.

So if your child was an August ...

The fastest way to get a sedentary person moving is to tell them the specific health dangers of inactivity, a new report suggests.

For the study, researchers surveyed 615 Australian adults, aged 18 to 77, about their levels of physical activity, as well as their knowledge about the benefits of exercise and the dangers of being a couch potato.

Even though 99.6 percent of the ...

The type of high school teens attend may determine whether they'll try marijuana and other illegal drugs, a new study suggests.

"We concluded that schools play an important role in influencing adolescent behavior," said study first author Dr. Rebecca Dudovitz, an assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine.

"Investing in schools offers...

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