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Results for search "Allergies: Nasal".

05 Apr

Climate Change and Seasonal Allergies

Climate change is blasting allergy sufferers with pollen earlier and longer than normal.

Health News Results - 16

Valentine's Day is a great opportunity to shower your loved one with gifts, but some may do more harm than good.

"If you want to impress your beloved this year, take a pass on gifts that cause sneezing and wheezing," said allergist Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"Once you have an understanding of your vale...

Toddlers have an increased risk of allergies if they are exposed to multiple indoor pollutants in their first years of life, a new study finds.

It included 108 mother-child pairs. Researchers assessed exposures to various household pollutants such as pet dander and tobacco smoke while the women were pregnant, then when children were aged 6 months, 1 year and 2 years.

A skin ...

Asthma or allergies can put a damper on holiday gatherings. But there are ways you can stay healthy, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology says.

"Everyone wants this time of year to be picture-perfect. But when there are runny noses, itchy eyes and sneezing involved, the picture is less than ideal. There are steps you can take to make your celebrations more fun and jo...

Many children deal with chronic health issues -- but it doesn't mean they can't enjoy life as much as other kids, a new study finds.

Researchers found that among more than 1,200 5- to 9-year-olds, those with some of the most common childhood ills were no less happy with their lives than other kids.

They said the findings highlight an important point: Kids aren't "defined" by...

Have you started feeling like your allergies are acting up earlier every year, or maybe they're lasting longer?

New research suggests it's not just your imagination -- climate change appears to be disrupting nature's usual calendar.

Areas with an earlier spring had a 14% higher rate of seasonal allergies (hay fever), the researchers found.

"Climate change is...

Under-the-tongue allergy pills have quickly caught on as a way to treat hay fever and dust mite allergies, a new study finds.

Allergy shots have been available for more than 100 years, while sublingual, or under-the-tongue, allergy pills were only approved for use in the United States in 2014.

But of 268 U.S. allergists surveyed last year, 73% reported prescribing under-...

Spring is in the air, and that can mean misery for people with seasonal allergies.

"Allergies affect millions in the U.S., and while is there no way to avoid irritants like pollen entirely, there are simple solutions to mitigate allergic reactions," said Dr. Joseph Cooke, chair of the department of medicine at New York-Presbyterian Queens Hospital.

"If you want to reduce all...

When it's finally time to store away your winter coats and boots, it's also a good time to rid your home of the allergens that accumulated over the winter, an allergist suggests.

"If you aren't someone who regularly undertakes spring cleaning, consider tackling it this year," said Dr. Todd Mahr, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"A ...

Do so-called hypoallergenic dogs really protect you against asthma?

Many dog-lovers believe it, but Swedish researchers found no evidence that "allergy-friendly" breeds -- such as poodles and miniature Schnauzers -- actually lower the risk for the wheezing lung disease.

Previous studies have shown that growing up with dogs can reduce a child's asthma risk, but researchers w...

If you live in Maine and you've never experienced hay fever, new research predicts that climate change has an unwelcome surprise in store for you.

Warmer temperatures in the northern United States will allow ragweed -- the plant that triggers hay fever -- to flourish in areas it's never been before. About 35 years from now, the study predicts, ragweed will be found in New Hampshire, M...

Allergies and asthma can make the start of the new school year a challenge for kids who aren't prepared to deal with flare-ups, an allergist warns.

"Every age group is different in how much they can handle when it comes to protecting themselves from flare-ups due to allergies and asthma while at school, as well as severe allergic reactions from food allergi...

Children with autism are more likely to also have a food, respiratory or skin allergy, new research suggests.

What's not clear from the new study, however, is whether there's a common cause behind these conditions.

"More research is needed to determine whether there is a causal relation between allergies and autism, or something else causes both conditions," said senior stu...

Lots of things grow in the spring, including your risk of severe allergic reactions and asthma attacks. So people need to take preventive measures and know when to seek medical care, an emergency physician says.

"Spring tends to bring more people to the emergency department," Dr. Paul Kivela, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, said in a college news release.

If you suffer from allergies, you already know that pollen is in the air -- even in the parts of the United States with unseasonably cool temperatures. So what kind of allergy season can we expect this year?

Will we see a return of the pollen vortex? Might we have a blooming bombogenesis of pollen?

Don't scoff: There is some evidence that climate change and increasingly wa...

Hay fever sufferers often choose the wrong medication for their seasonal sniffles, new research suggests.

With flowers, trees and grasses springing back to life, folks with allergies will start to complain of sneezing, runny noses, and watery, itchy eyes.

More often than not, though, they'll head to the allergy aisle of their nearest drug store without advice from a doctor o...

Asthma and allergies can put on damper on your Valentine's Day romancing, an expert warns.

"Keeping everyone free of allergy and asthma flare-ups helps keep the focus on romance this Valentine's Day. Red or itchy eyes, runny noses, coughs and fatigue can ruin your celebration," Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a c...

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