Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Discrimination".

Health News Results - 12

Having a large social network of other people with the same sexual identity benefits the health of LGBT people, a new study finds.

Previous studies have found that discrimination and related stress can be harmful to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, so researchers decided to look at social factors that may reduce that harm.

The investigators...

Race, gender and sexual orientation are tied to mistreatment of medical school students by faculty, physicians and fellow students, according to a new report.

For the study, Yale University researchers analyzed more than 27,500 surveys of students at 140 accredited medical schools in the United States.

The researchers found that women, Asians, under-represented minorities, a...

Discrimination based on age -- ageism -- is widespread throughout the world, and it takes a toll, new research reveals.

The study of more than 7 million people aged 50 and older in 45 countries found that age affected whether or not they got medical treatment and, whether the treatment, its length and frequency were appropriate.

The investigators reviewed 422 published st...

Mass shootings, health care and the 2020 presidential election are significant causes of stress for American adults, a new survey finds.

The poll of more than 3,600 U.S. adults found that 71% of them said mass shootings are a major source of stress, an increase from 62% in 2018. Hispanics were most likely to say mass shootings are a significant source of stress (84%), foll...

It's not only women who agonize over their excess pounds. Stigma about being overweight can cause physical and emotional harm to men, too.

"It's often assumed that conversations about weight loss, poor body image, and dieting are more salient for women. Men are frequently overlooked, but that does not necessarily mean that men are less affected by weight stigma or less likely to inter...

The number of preterm births to Hispanic women in the United States inched up shortly after the 2016 election -- raising the question of whether the political climate played a role, researchers say.

The study, of births between 2009 and 2017, found an uptick in preterm deliveries among Hispanic women that occurred in the nine months after President Trump was elected.

During ...

Ageism is pervasive throughout society, and harmful to young and old alike. But a new study finds some simple steps can help erase it.

Mixing younger and older people in various settings, combined with educating younger people about the aging process and its misconceptions, works quickly to reduce ageism, the new research indicates.

"The findings really suggest that these in...

Many people -- including those who are overweight themselves -- view people with obesity as less human or less evolved, new research reveals.

In four online studies questioning more than 1,500 participants from the United States, the United Kingdom and India, researchers also found that dehumanization of those with obesity predicted support for policies that discriminate against this...

Women scientists get less early-career research funding from the U.S. government than men, which can put them at a disadvantage for the rest of their careers, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed grants given by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to 53,000 first-time principal investigators (57 percent men and 43 percent women) between 2006 and 2017.

The average ...

Women juggling a medical career and motherhood often face significant workplace discrimination, a new study finds.

Researchers conducted an online survey of U.S. doctors who were mothers. The age range was 24 to 62, and most worked more than 40 hours a week.

Common complaints included less chance of career development; financial penalties; lack of support before and after bi...

Prejudice directed at older people results in $63 billion in excess health costs each year in the United States, a new study claims.

Ageism, which is the marginalization of the elderly in society, accounts for one of every seven dollars spent on the eight most expensive health conditions for Americans older than 60. Those conditions include heart disease, chronic respiratory disease ...

Hiring people with criminal records may offer a short-term pay off, at least in customer service jobs, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., collected data on nearly 59,000 people hired for sales or customer service jobs in U.S. call centers from May 2008 to January 2014.

They found employees with a criminal record stayed an avera...