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740 Results for search "Brain".

Health News Results - 740

Older adults who avoid surgery because they fear general anesthesia will cause thinking declines need not worry, researchers report.

A study of more than 1,000 patients who had heart surgery at four hospitals in Canada found that the amount of anesthesia used did not affect the risk of delirium after surgery. Post-surgery delirium may contribute to cognitive decline.

How much anesth...

When there's pain, pressure and pounding in your head, you might think the worst: Is it a brain tumor?

Probably not, a Penn State physician assures. 

Headache in and of itself is not a common sign of a tumor, because the brain itself doesn't feel pain, said Dr. John Messmer, medical director at Penn State H...

New research shows that a set of healthy lifestyle habits can help preserve brain function in folks with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia.

About 71% of patients who ate healthy, exercised regularly and engaged in stress management had their dementia symptoms either remain stable or improve without the use of any

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 7, 2024
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  • Vigorous exercise more than once a week can lower the risk of dementia for people with high blood pressure, a new clinical trial shows.

    People who engaged each week in vigorous physical activity had lower rates of mild cognitive impairment and dementia despite their h...

    Severe forms of autism could be linked to overgrowth of the brain's outer layer that starts while a baby is in the womb, a new study finds.

    Toddlers with autism have cerebral cortexes -- often referred to as “gray matter” -- that are roughly 40% larger than those of children without the developmental disorder, researchers reported recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 7, 2024
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  • One of the biggest obstacles to treating brain cancer is getting tumor-killing drugs past the blood-brain barrier that normally protects the brain from foreign invaders.

    Now, new research shows that ultrasound waves emitted from a device implanted in a cancer patient's skull could be the key to getting chemotherapy and immunotherapy drugs into the brain.

    This ultrasound technology a...

    Cerebral aneurysms: For most people, the word signals a sudden, fatal brain bleed that seemingly comes out of nowhere.

    However, an expert at Penn State Health says that in many cases these brain blood vessel ruptures are spotted early, before they rupture. And even when they do occur, they are not uniformly fatal.

    What is a cerebral aneurysm?

    “An aneurysm is...

    California skateboarder Jared Hager has become the first person to receive a transparent skull replacement, which allows doctors to better view the function of his brain.

    The window has allowed doctors to both monitor his progress and test new and better scanning methods for assessing brain health.

    Hager, 39, of Downey, Calif., sustained a traumatic brain injury from a skateboarding...

    Stuttering is a neurological condition, not a psychological one, and scientists in Finland now believe they've found the disrupted network in the brain that may cause it.

    "These findings explain well-known features of stuttering, such as the motor difficulties in speech production and the significant variability in stuttering severity across emotional states," said senior study author

    A bilingual brain implant has allowed a stroke survivor to communicate in both Spanish and English, scientists report.

    Turning to an AI method known as a neural network, researchers trained the patient's implant to decode words based on the brain activity produced when he tried to articulate those words, and then display those words and sentences on a screen.

    This method allows t...

    One of the toughest decisions seniors face is when to give up their keys and stop driving.

    Even slight changes to the ability to remember, think and reason can lead a senior to decide to stop driving, a new study finds.

    Impaired cognitive function foreshadows the decision of many seniors ...

    Specific nutrients could play a pivotal role in the healthy aging of your brain, a new study finds.

    What's more, those nutrients correlate closely with those found in the Mediterranean diet, an eating pattern already associated with healthy brain aging, researchers report.

    The identified nutrients “...

    The smell of food is appetizing when you're hungry. At the same time, it can be a turnoff if you're full.

    That's due to the interaction between two different parts of the brain involving sense of smell and behavior motivation, a new study finds.

    And it could be why some people can't easily stop eating wh...

    Higher rates of blood vessel-damaging conditions like hypertension or diabetes may be driving up rates of cognitive decline and dementia among older American Indians, new research shows.

    The study found that 54% of American Indians ages 72 to 95 had some form of impairment in their thinking and/or memory skills, while 10% had dementia.

    The underlying causes: Vascular (blood vessel)...

    People who carry two copies of the gene mutation most strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease are almost certain to develop brain changes related to the degenerative disorder, a new study says.

    A single mutated APOE4 gene has been found to pose the strongest genetics-driven risk factor for late-onset

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2024
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  • Researchers say they've identified a human “neural compass” -- a pattern of brain activity that helps prevent humans from becoming lost.

    For the first time, the internal compass humans use to orient themselves and navigate through the environment has been pinpointed in the human brain, researchers reported May 6 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 7, 2024
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  • A middle-aged Seattle man collapsed in his Portland, Ore.-area hotel room, where he was staying during a business trip.

    He'd just tried fentanyl for the first time, and it very nearly killed him by literally destroying his brain.

    Inhaling fentanyl caused terrible inflammation throughout la...

    • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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    • April 30, 2024
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    Researchers have conclusively identified the genetic cause of a rare, progressive movement disorder.

    A rare extra-long version of a gene appears to cause nerve cells to become poisoned by toxic proteins in people with spinocerebellar ataxia 4 (SCA4), researchers report.

    SCA4 causes muscle weakness and difficulty coordinating body movement, most notably resulting in a jerky and unste...

    Advanced scanning techniques can find hidden inflammation in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, a new study shows.

    This “smoldering” inflammation detected by positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans could help explain why patients continue to decline even though imaging shows no brain changes, researchers reported recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2024
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  • It's long been known that exposure to agricultural pesticides can greatly raise a person's odds for Parkinson's disease.

    New genetics research now reveals those who might be most vulnerable.

    A team at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), pored over genetic data from 800 Par...

    Soldiers can suffer brain injury if they are repeatedly exposed to explosive blasts, a new study shows.

    Further, the more frequently a soldier is exposed to explosions, the greater their risk for brain injury, researchers reported April 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Based on this, researchers intend to develop a diagnostic test to detect blast b...

    An early marker of multiple sclerosis could help doctors figure out who will eventually fall prey to the degenerative nerve disease, a new study says.

    In one in 10 cases of MS, the body begins producing a distinctive set of antibodies in the blood years before symptoms start appearing, researchers reported April 19 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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  • Jobs that challenge your mind could help your brain age more gracefully, a new study suggests.

    The harder your brain works on the job, the less likely you are to have memory and thinking problems later in life, researchers reported April 17 in the journal Neurology.

    “We examined the demands of various jobs and found that cognitive stimulation at work during different sta...

    Antipsychotics can substantially increase dementia patients' risk of many serious health problems, a new study warns.

    Dementia patients prescribed antipsychotics have increased risk of stroke, blood clots, heart attack, heart failure, bone fractures, pneumonia and kidney damage, researchers re...

    Want to feel happier?

    Live in or near a place with a rich diversity of nature, a new study says.

    Environments with plentiful natural features -- trees, birds, plants and rivers -- are associated with better mental well-being than the more spartan landscapes of suburbia, researchers found.

    Further, spending time in areas like this can provide benefits that last up to eight hour...

    Most folks think of blinking as the eyes' version of windshield wipers, clearing the eye of debris and maybe lubricating it, too.

    But blinking is much more than that, researchers report: It also helps the brain process what it's seeing.

    That's perhaps counterintuitive: Wouldn't it make sense to not blink, so eyes are receiving an uninterrupted stream of information?

    Tapping the power of the small brain region called the cerebellum could improve patients' ability to move cutting-edge robotic limbs, a new study suggests.

    The cerebellum is an ancient structure located under the brain, just above where the spinal cord connects to the brain.

    This structure has largely been overlooked by prosthetics researchers in favor of the cerebral cortex, which ...

    Lucid episodes are an unexpected occurrence among people with late-stage Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    But these spontaneous events -- in which a person temporarily regains an ability to communicate that appeared to be permanently lost -- are not always a sign of impending death, a recent study argues.

    Half the time, people live more than six months following their luci...

    You know exercise is great for your cardiovascular health, but new research suggests that your brain has a lot to do with it.

    It's all about physical activity's ability to lower stress levels within the brain, explained a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston.

    Bolstering that finding, their study found that exercise brought the greatest heart benefits to peop...

    The discovery of a gene variant that rids the brain of toxic plaques linked to Alzheimer's might lead to new treatments for the disease, researchers report.

    The variant arises naturally in people who don't seem to get Alzheimer's disease despite having another gene, called APOEe4, that strongly prom...

    Desks that require folks to stand or move as they work also might help them produce better results on the job, a new study suggests.

    People's brains became sharper when working at a desk that made them stand, step or walk rather than sit, results show.

    Reasoning scores in particular improved when at an active workstation, researchers said.

    “It is feasible to blend movement w...

    As their aging brains shrink, older dogs can suffer the same memory and thinking problems as many older humans do.

    But dogs are just like humans in another way -- playtime and social activities can help preserve their brain function, a new study finds.

    Exercising, socializing, playing with toys and playing with other dogs helped a small group of beagles maintain their brains, resear...

    For folks who have battled alcohol dependency for years, any treatment that could curb or block alcohol cravings would be a huge advance.

    Now, research in mice is giving a glimmer of hope that just such a therapy might be possible.

    A compound -- so far dubbed LY2444296 -- appears to block a key brain cell receptor called the kappa opioid receptor (KOP), a team at the Scripps Researc...

    Out of a host of possible risk factors for dementia, three really stood out in a new analysis: Diabetes, air pollution and alcohol.

    British and American researchers used brain scans to focus on a neurological network they labeled a "weak spot" in the brain. This network is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, as well as

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 28, 2024
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  • Fried foods not only wreck the waistline, but they could also be harming the brain, a new study of lab rats suggests.

    Fed chow that was fried in sesame or sunflower oil, the rodents developed liver and colon problems that wound up affecting their brain health, researchers found.

    These brain health effects not only were found in the lab rats that munched down the fried food, but also...

    Youngsters might have good cause to think they're brainier than their parents or grandparents, a new study finds.

    It turns out that human brains are getting larger with each generation, potentially adding more brain reserve and reducing the overall risk of dementia, researchers report March 25 in the journa...

    Chemicals found in common household products might damage the brain's wiring, a new study warns.

    These chemicals -- found in disinfectants, cleaners, hair products, furniture and textiles -- could be linked to degenerative brain diseases like multiple sclerosis and autism, researchers report.

    The chemicals specifically affect the brain's oligodendrocytes, a specialized type of cell ...

    “Havana Syndrome” appears to cause real and severe symptoms among federal employees suffering from the mystery illness, but there's no evidence of brain injury or biological abnormalities among them, a new report shows.

    Researchers evaluated 81 U.S. diplomats and other federal employees, mostly stationed abroad, who had complained of hearing noise and feeling head pressure just before...

    In people with type 1 diabetes, fluctuations in blood sugar levels can affect thinking skills in various ways, new research shows.

    Researchers looked specifically at what's known as cognitive processing speed (how fast people process incoming information) and attention.

    <...

    After a car crash, women are more likely to go into shock than men, even when their injuries are less severe, new research shows.

    "Women are arriving to the trauma bay with signs of shock more often than men, regardless of injury severity," said study leader Susan Cronn, a researcher at the Medical College of W...

    Specialized brain scans may accurately predict whether a psychotic patient will go on to develop treatment-resistant schizophrenia, Dutch researchers report.

    The scan -- called a neuromelanin-sensitive MRI, or NM-MRI for short -- zeroes in on a brain pigment called neuromelanin. This pigment c...

    Combat veterans who suffered traumatic brain injuries due to explosive blasts may have markers in their spinal fluid similar to those of Alzheimer's disease, new research finds.

    "Previous research has shown that moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries may increase a person's risk of Alzheimer's disease," said senior study author

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 14, 2024
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  • Kids struggling with mental health problems have a tougher time recovering from a concussion, a new study finds.

    These troubled kids tend to have more emotional symptoms after concussion and take longer to fully recover, results show.

    In ...

    New technology might soon allow men in same-sex relationships to have a child genetically related to both dads, researchers say.

    The technology uses skin cells from one person to alter the genetics of a donated egg, researchers reported March 8 in the journal Science Advances.

    That egg can then be fertilized b...

    Instead of approving the new Alzheimer's drug donanemab this month, as was expected, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will now require the experimental medication be scrutinized more closely by an expert panel, the drug's maker said Friday.

    “The FDA has informed Lilly it wants to further understand topics related to evaluating the safety and efficacy of donanemab, including the saf...

    Folks who've suffered a concussion and then develop headaches show iron accumulation in their brains, new research discovers.

    Excess brain iron stores are a hallmark of damage, noted a team led by Simona Nikolova, of the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. The team is slated to present the results in April at the an...

    Sleep apnea could have detrimental effects on the brain, causing memory or thinking problems, a new study suggests.

    People suffering from sleep apnea are about 50% more likely to also report having memory or thinking problems, compared to those without sleep apnea, researchers say.

    “These findings highlight the importance of early screening for sleep apnea,” said researcher

    In a finding that unearths yet another way Long COVID can harm health, new research finds the condition may trigger thinking declines.

    Published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study involved cognitive testing on nearly 113,000 people in England. It found that thos...

    Middle-aged folks who have difficulties navigating their way through space could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease years later, a new study finds.

    “Very early symptoms of dementia can be subtle and difficult to detect, but problems with navigation are thought to be some of the first changes in Alzheimer's disease," noted

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 29, 2024
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  • Live musical performances speak to the soul, stimulating the brain in ways more powerful than listening to a recorded tune does, new research finds.

    “Our study showed that pleasant and unpleasant emotions performed as live music elicited much higher and more consistent activity in the amygdala [the emotional center of the brain] than recorded music,” said lead researcher

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 28, 2024
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