Using our mobile app? Be sure to check for any new app updates to receive any enhancements.
Logo

Get Healthy!

415 Results for search "Exercise: Misc.".

Health News Results - 415

TUESDAY, Nov. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

Their new study found that in older adults, cl...

Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

"It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

FRIDAY, Nov. 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life bei...

People suffering from dangerous abnormal heart rhythms can take matters into their own hands and figure out what is triggering their episodes, researchers report.

Folks with atrial fibrillation (a-fib) were able to reduce their episodes of the irregular heartbeat by 40% by identifying and then avoiding the substances or activities that caused their heart to go herky-jerky, according to fi...

Your daily cup of joe might be a quick pick-me-up, but it comes with a mixed bag of good and not-so-good effects on your health, a new study reports.

Drinking coffee helps people stay more active, but it also significantly robs some of sleep, researchers say.

And while java doesn't seem to cause irregular rhythms in the upper chamber of the heart, it can cause the lower chamber...

Long COVID is rare in college athletes, but those who have had COVID-19 should see a doctor if they have chest pain during activity, the authors of new study advise.

The extent and effects of persistent symptoms in athletes after COVID-19 infection have been unclear, so researchers went searching for answers.

"For the vast majority of athletes, this study shows that a return to play...

Arm and shoulder pain are common for women after breast cancer surgery, and beginning a supervised exercise program soon afterwards can go a long way to easing the discomfort, new research suggests.

As the team of British investigators explained, restricted shoulder movement and chronic pain or swelling in the armpit area can really impact a patient's recovery and quality of life.

...

Call it the great pandemic sit-down.

As COVID-19 turned daily commutes into shuffles between rooms at home, and Netflix replaced time spent at the gym or playing sports, Americans have been sitting a lot more. Now a new study suggests it may be putting their mental health at risk.

"We knew COVID was going to affect our behavior and what we could do in lots of weird, funky ways that...

Dr. Kim Huffman, an avid runner, gets a fair amount of guff from friends about the impact that her favorite exercise has on her body.

"People all the time tell me, 'Oh, you wait until you're 60. Your knees are going to hate you for it'," Huffman said. "And I'm like, 'That's ridiculous'."

Next time the topic comes up, Huffman is well-armed: An extensive British analysis of prior stud...

Modern Americans get much less physical activity than their forebearers did 200 years ago, and increasing reliance on technology is a major reason why.

That's the finding from researchers who used data on falling body temperature and changing metabolic rates in the United States to measure de...

As basketball fans crammed into stadiums, U.S. counties with universities that hosted "March Madness" games saw a jump in COVID-19 cases earlier this year, new research shows.

"Counties that are home to universities that participated in NCAA March Madness saw a temporary increase in COVID-19 cases beginning eight days following the tournament and peaking 24 days after the tournament, rela...

Just a few hours a week of moderate exercise may reduce your risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

If Americans got the recommended five hours a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, more than 46,000 cancer cases could be prevented in the United States each year, according to the report.

The study authors said that 3% of all cancer cases in U.S. adults aged 30 and older fr...

A new study may allay concerns that strenuous exercise could up the risk for developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an incurable neurological disease.

No evidence of rising ALS risk was seen among adults who routinely work up a sweat by playing team sports or engaging in heavy gym workouts. Nor was increased ALS risk associated with less intense leisure activities, such as runnin...

Days in the saddle can be risky, with horseback riding a potentially deadly activity, according to a new study.

"Hospital admission risk from horseback riding is higher than football, auto and motorcycle racing, and skiing," the study authors noted. Chest injuries are most common among riders, but head and neck injuries are the deadliest.

The findings show that "equestrian-related i...

Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children a...

Many American arthritis sufferers aren't getting any exercise despite its benefits for reducing pain and improving their quality of life, new research shows.

Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults with arthritis engaged in physical activity in the past month, most often walking, according to a new data analysis ...

You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

If you intend to run, bike or put in a Zumba video after work, plan on doing it sooner rather than later.

A workout that ends a couple of hours before bedtime should help you fall asleep, while one that's closer to bedtime could have you counting a lot of sheep.

"Overall, our analysis showed that when exercise ended two hours before bedtime, there were sleep benefits, including the...

Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

"Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

Strength training can help you lose weight, Australian researchers report.

Their new study reports you can lose a percentage of body fat through strength training alone that is similar to weight loss through cardio or aerobics.

"A lot of people think that if you want to lose weight, you need to go out and run," said researcher Mandy Hagstrom, an exercise physiologist and senior lec...

Exercise may help reduce symptoms of a common sleep disorder and improve brain function, a small study finds.

Exercise training could be a useful supplemental treatment for people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, the research showed. The condition is characterized by loud snoring and disrupted breathing and can raise the risk for heart disease, stroke and cognitive decline...

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

People with high blood pressure that doesn't respond to treatment may have more success by following the DASH diet and joining a supervised diet and exercise program, a new study suggests.

DASH is short for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — a regimen rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and limited salt.

Duke University researchers found it can help people w...

COVID-19 shouldn't keep budding athletes on the sidelines. But it's critical to keep them safe from the coronavirus while playing sports.

The National Athletic Trainers' Association has some timely tips.

COVID vaccines for those 12 and older have been a game changer for many families. Being fully vaccinated can make returning to sports safer, the association said.

But for kid...

Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

Yet, a small, new pilot study suggest...

Insulin resistance can make you more than twice as likely to develop major depression, even if you haven't developed full-blown diabetes, a new study reports.

Initially healthy people who later developed prediabetes were 2.6 times more likely to come down with major depression during a nine-year follow-up period, according to the findings.

"The insulin-resistant folks had two to t...

A year of exercise training helped to preserve or increase the youthful elasticity of the heart muscle among people showing early signs of heart failure, a small study shows.

The new research, published Sept. 20 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, bolsters the idea that "exercise is medicine," an important shift in approach, the researchers wrote.

The stu...

After a stroke, the best time to work on regaining hand and arm use is 60 to 90 days later, according to a new clinical trial.

Starting intensive rehab at less than 30 days can be helpful, too, but waiting until six months can be too late for maximum benefit, said researchers from Georgetown University and MedStar National Rehabilitation Network.

Nearly two-thirds of the 750,000 ind...

Shedding excess weight does much more for the long-term heart health of young people than building muscle, new research suggests.

It's not that gaining muscle while young proved to be a cardiovascular problem. It's just that losing fat offered bigger heart benefits.

"We absolutely still encourage exercise," said study lead author Joshua Bell, a senior research associate in epidemio...

Anxiety prevention may be just a snowy trail away.

New research suggests cross-country skiers -- and perhaps others who also exercise vigorously -- are less prone to develop anxiety disorders than less active folks.

Researchers in Sweden spent roughly two decades tracking anxiety risk among more than 395,000 Swedes. Nearly half the participants were skiers with a history of competin...

Exercising during pregnancy can benefit babies' lungs, Scandinavian researchers report.

"This study offers a fascinating hint that increased physical activity of mothers is associated with better lung function in their babies and, therefore, possibly their health in later life," said Jonathan Grigg, head of the European Respiratory Society Tobacco Control Committee, who was not involved i...

College students often put on weight during their freshman year, and a lack of structured exercise may be largely to blame, a new study suggests.

Weight gain is so common among first-year college students that it has spawned the phrase "the freshman 15" -- though that figure is something of a myth.

More often, studies have found, college freshmen gain about 8 pounds over the academi...

The pause in youth sports caused by the COVID-19 pandemic wound up shaking some budding athletes to their core, a new U.S. survey shows.

More than 1 in 10 youth athletes ended up reconsidering their sports goals or aspirations as the pandemic closed stadiums and gyms. That included one-quarter of athletes in their later teens, researchers found.

Some felt that the pandemic cost them...

Heart attack survivors could gain more than seven healthy years of life if they take the right medications and improve their lifestyle, new research estimates.

Unfortunately, studies have found, heart attack survivors rarely get optimal control over their risk factors.

The new research echoes that evidence: Of more than 3,200 patients, only 2% had their blood pressure, cholesterol a...

Football and other contact sports get a lot of attention for their injury hazards. But for most adults, bike riding is the biggest back-breaker, a new study suggests.

Of more than 12,000 sports-related spinal injuries among U.S. adults, researchers found that a full 81% were due to bicycling mishaps. The injuries mostly included vertebral fractures, often in the neck but also in the middl...

If you're a 60-something with heart disease, it's not too late to give your ticker the benefits of a regular workout.

Swiss researchers found that survival rates among heart patients who became active later in life were nearly the same as those who'd been exercising for years.

"Continuing an active lifestyle over the years is associated with the greatest longevity," said study autho...

For breast cancer patients battling "chemo brain," regular exercise may be a powerful prescription, a new study suggests.

The term "chemo brain" refers to thinking and memory problems often experienced by patients who undergo chemotherapy.

It's "a growing clinical concern," said study first author Elizabeth Salerno, an assistant professor of surgery at Washington University School o...

Millions of Americans live with a common abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (a-fib), but new research suggests that exercise might ease the severity of the condition.

When folks with a-fib participated in a six-month exercise program, they were able to maintain a normal heart rhythm and had less severe symptoms than those who only received information about the benefits of...

You've heard the warnings about kids who are forever glued to their screens, but all that screen time can have devastating health effects for grown-ups.

If you're under 60, too much time using a computer, watching TV or reading could boost your risk for a stroke, Canadian researchers warn.

"Be aware that very high sedentary time with little time spent on physical activity can have a...

Take a work break: A small, new study suggests that getting out of your chair every half hour may help improve your blood sugar levels and your overall health.

Every hour spent sitting or lying down increases the risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, the study authors said. But moving around during those sedentary hours is an easy way to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce t...

Want to see a temperamental tween or teen act happier?

The formula is simple, a large international study suggests.

"Screen time should be replaced by 'green time' for optimizing the well-being of our kids," said study author Asad Khan, an associate professor in biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

That advice stems from survey...

The benefits of regular outdoor exercise in areas with air pollution outweigh the risks, a new, long-term study claims.

"Habitual exercise reduces the risk of death regardless of exposure to air pollution, and air pollution generally increases the risk of death regardless of habitual exercise," said researcher Dr. Xiang Qian Lao, from the Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Ca...

Achilles tendon injuries have skyrocketed in the United States this year, researchers report.

Physicians at Michigan Medicine-University of Michigan diagnosed more Achilles ruptures during June 2021 than in all of 2020.

Injuries to the body's strongest, thickest tendon account for about 30% of all sports-related injuries, and are most common among active, middle-aged men, they added...

After a stroke, survivors can greatly increase their odds for many more years of life through activities as easy as a half-hour's stroll each day, new research shows.

The nearly five-year-long Canadian study found that stroke survivors who walked or gardened at least three to four hours a week (about 30 minutes a day), cycled at least two to three hours per week, or got an equivalent amou...

If you're like many people, your waistline has expanded during the pandemic.

"The world shut down," said Heather Tressler, a registered dietitian at the Penn State Celiac Clinic at Penn State Health's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. "Maybe you didn't change what you ate, but you became less active."

Lately, Tressler says she's seeing patients -- adults and children -- who have ga...

Seniors, it may be easier than you think to undo the damage of decades of bad eating and precious little exercise.

New research shows that cutting just 250 calories a day and exercising moderately could lead to not only weight loss but improved vascular health in older obese adults.

These lifestyle changes may help offset age-related increases in aortic stiffness, which is a measure...

Having a genetic heart condition often means the end of sports for young athletes, but new research could be a game changer.

A 20-year study by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that for kids with most genetic heart conditions, the risks of playing sports can be managed through a shared decision-making process.

The study is a continuation of research on return to play ...

This summer has brought dangerous, record-breaking heat to parts of the United States and Canada. The hot weather poses an extra challenge for pregnant women.

Mothers-to-be need to stay cool to avoid heat exhaustion and its complications, according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston.

"The summer is tough on pregnant women because the body struggles to cool down w...

To do their best, Olympic athletes need to be both physically and mentally fit, but the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics has made that a real challenge, experts say.

"This Olympics is unprecedented," said Dr. Michael Lardon, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

The Tokyo Olympics itself, which officiall...

Here's yet another reason to limit screen time and get moving: Boosting your activity levels could reduce your risk of sleep apnea, according to a new study.

Compared to the most active people in the study, those who spent more than four hours a day sitting watching TV had a 78% higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and those with sedentary jobs had a 49% higher risk.

And th...