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Results for search "Pollution, Water".

03 Sep

Microplastic Pollution and Your Health

Are you consuming thousands of tiny plastic particles every year?

Health News Results - 16

Scientists have found one more way Flipper is a lot like people: The sharp rise in antibiotic resistance affecting humans is also happening to dolphins.

The discovery stems from a 13-year study of bottlenose dolphins in Florida's Indian River Lagoon.

"We've been able to provide a large database of information in order to continue learning from these impressive animals," sai...

Is the sunscreen you slather on your body marketed as safe for coral reefs? New research suggests those claims may not be entirely true.

Trace metals and other compounds in many sunscreens have unknown effects on marine ecology, say researchers studying Mediterranean waters.

Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet-screening ingredients in sunscreens can harm coral and o...

Although DDT was banned in the 1970s, the toxic pesticide still lurks in the sediment of lakes in New Brunswick, Canada, researchers report.

To control insects, airplanes sprayed nearly 6,300 tons of DDT onto New Brunswick forests between 1952 and 1968.

Sprayed DDT can enter lakes and rivers, and find its way into the food chain, researchers say.

To see if DDT had ...

Millions of tons of nitrate from industrial farming find their way into America's drinking water each year, causing thousands of cases of cancer and other health problems, an environmental advocacy group says.

In a new report, researchers from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) quantify the risk. They say nitrate is responsible for nearly 12,600 cases of cancer a year.

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Levels of antibiotics in some of the world's rivers are hundreds of times higher than what's considered safe, British researchers report.

For the new study, investigators checked rivers in 72 countries on six continents for 14 widely used antibiotics and found them at 65% of monitored sites.

"The results are quite eye-opening and worrying, demonstrating the widespread co...

Does your home draw its water source from a well? A new study finds that well water may be injurious to heart health in young adults -- if it contains arsenic.

"People drinking water from private wells, which are not regulated, need to be aware that arsenic may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease," said study author Dr. Gernot Pichler. He is an internal medicine specialist at...

A toxic byproduct of Agent Orange is still widespread in Vietnam's soil and water and is getting into food supplies, a new study claims.

Agent Orange was a chemical defoliant widely used by the U.S. military during the Vietnam War from 1962 to 1975. The herbicide contained dangerous dioxins.

"Existing Agent Orange and dioxin research is primarily medical in nature, focusing ...

No plastic is good for seabirds, but new Australian research finds that balloon bits pose the most deadly threat to marine life.

"Balloons, or balloon fragments, were the marine debris most likely to cause mortality, and they killed almost one in five of the seabirds that ingested them," said study author Lauren Roman, a Ph.D. student at the University of Tasmania's Institute for Mari...

In a microcosm of the planet's ocean woes, British researchers report that 50 dolphins, seals and whales examined after washing up on that country's shores all had pieces of discarded plastic trapped in their digestive tracts.

More than 80 percent of the tiny pieces were synthetic fibers from items such as discarded clothes, fishing nets and toothbrushes, according to researchers from...

Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said Kristie Ebi, one of the report's authors.

The first drug to combat farting in livestock has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Yes, you read that right: When fed to beef cattle under specific conditions, Experior results in less ammonia gas released by the animals and their waste.

"Today we're announcing the approval of the first animal drug that reduces ammonia gas emissions from an animal or ...

There's a good chance a dose of tiny plastic particles has taken up residence in your gut, a new, small study argues.

Microplastics, as they are called, were found in stool samples from a handful of volunteers located across Europe and Asia, researchers report.

Every single person out of the group of 8 had microplastics in their stool, on average about 20 particles for every...

Government corruption is Americans' biggest concern, a new survey contends, but worries about the environment are also a dominant fear.

The 5th annual Survey of American Fears from Chapman University in Orange, Calif., was based on a nationally representative sample of 1,190 U.S. adults and conducted in June-July of this year. People were asked about 94 topics. The survey found nearl...

Widely used household and industrial chemicals may harm the kidneys, researchers say.

These manufactured chemicals, called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), are not biodegradable. People are exposed to them through contaminated soil, food, water and air.

"The kidneys are very sensitive organs, particularly when it comes to environmental toxins that can get in our b...

Sunscreen washing off swimmers may pose a threat to fish and other aquatic life, a new study suggests.

Ultraviolet (UV) filters have been added to many personal care products, including sunscreens, moisturizers and makeup. And swimmers, in particular, are advised to reapply sunscreen often or risk a painful and potentially harmful sunburn.

But scientists have now begun to qu...

Can dogs help keep nasty bacteria off the beaches?

A new study suggests it's possible: E. coli spread by seagull droppings prompts beach closings, but dog patrols that chased the birds away did their part in keeping beaches open.

The bacteria can be spread by other birds and other animals, even dogs, but gulls are the primary culprit, the researchers noted.

"It's i...

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